Science
Health dictionary
Untitled Document
Search :      

Art dictionary
Financial dictionary
Hollywood dictionary
Insurance dictionary
Literature dictionary
Real Estate dictionary
Tourism dictionary

 
  Science



Science

   1. A continuous process whose basic purposes are to make phenomena recognizable and to predict outcomes, and whose fundamental activities comprise|(a) observing and describing phenomena and developing general conclusions about them; (b) integrating new data with organized observations that have been confirmed; (c) formulating testable hypotheses based on the results of such integration; (d) testing such hypotheses under controlled, repeatable conditions; (e) observing the results of such testing, recording them unambiguously, and interpreting them clearly; and (f) actively seeking criticism from participants in science. 2. Knowledge from science. 3. A scientific domain (e.g., genetics). 4. Knowledge from a particular scientific domain. 5. Any system or method characterized by the application of scientific principles to practical ends (e.g., culinary science). 6. Any disciplined, systematized area of study. 7. Methodological activity, training, or study. 8. Any activity that ostensibly requires study and method. 9. Knowledge from experience. 10. A developed ability. 11. The state of knowing.

RELATED TERMS
--------------------------------------

Integration
The useful organization and incorporation of both new and old data, experience, and emotional capacities into the personality. Also refers to the organization and amalgamation of functions at various levels of psychosexual development.

Science
1. A continuous process whose basic purposes are to make phenomena recognizable and to predict outcomes, and whose fundamental activities comprise|(a) observing and describing phenomena and developing general conclusions about them; (b) integrating new data with organized observations that have been confirmed; (c) formulating testable hypotheses based on the results of such integration; (d) testing such hypotheses under controlled, repeatable conditions; (e) observing the results of such testing, recording them unambiguously, and interpreting them clearly; and (f) actively seeking criticism from participants in science. 2. Knowledge from science. 3. A scientific domain (e.g., genetics). 4. Knowledge from a particular scientific domain. 5. Any system or method characterized by the application of scientific principles to practical ends (e.g., culinary science). 6. Any disciplined, systematized area of study. 7. Methodological activity, training, or study. 8. Any activity that ostensibly requires study and method. 9. Knowledge from experience. 10. A developed ability. 11. The state of knowing.

Domain
compact segment of an immunoglobulin molecule, made up of about 110 amino acids around an S-S bond, and encoded by a unique segment of DNA, surrounded by nontranslated sequences.

Ability
The ability to acquire general or special types of knowledge or skill.



SIMILAR TERMS
--------------------------------------



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
--------------------------------------

Stroke unit
A section of an acute hospital dedicated to assessment and comprehensive rehabilitation programmes for, people with a recent stroke.

Study coordinator
See research coordinator.

Subject/trial subject
An individual who participates in a clinical trial, either as recipient of the investigational product(s) or as a control. See also healthy volunteer, human subject.

Superiority trial
A trial with the primary objective of showing that the response to the product is superior to a comparative agent (active or placebo control).

Surrogate variable
A variable that provides an indirect measurement effect in situations where direct measurement of clinical effect is not feasible or practical.

Science

Spirit
Among other things, wind; breath; life; the alleged vital force within living beings; an alleged soul inside or outside a living being; any alleged supernatural being; the nature of a person or of a group of persons; genius; and liveliness.

Stroke (apoplexy, cerebral accident, cerebrovascular accident, CVA, cerebral apoplexy)
A neural deficit that results from an undersupply of oxygen to the brain (e.g., due to thrombosis or a cerebral aneurysm, embolism, or hemorrhage), develops within minutes or hours, and persists for more than 24 hours.

Strong holism
An aspect of supernaturalistic pantheism, or Spinozism, which holds that nature is divine. According to strong holism, the universe is uninterrupted in substance--an unbroken whole--and all things have instantaneous interconnections.

Subtle energy
See "vital force."

Swedish massage
The most common form of bodywork in Western countries. Its originator, Peter Hendrik (Per Henrick) Ling (1776-1839), of Sweden, was a fencing master, physiologist, and poet. His method was called the "Ling system" or the "Swedish movement treatment." Dr. S.W. Mitchell introduced Swedish massage in the United States. It is based on scientific anatomy and often vigorous. The purported aim of Swedish massage is to improve circulation of blood and lymph.

   We thank you for using the Health Dictionary to search for Science. If you have a better definition for Science than the one presented here, please let us know by making use of the suggest a term option. This definition of Science may be disputed by other professionals. Our attempt is to provide easy definitions on Science and any other medical topic for the public at large.
 
This dictionary contains 59020 terms.      









  
                    © Health Dictionary 2005 - All rights reserved -

   cience / sience / scence / scince / sciece / sciene / scienc / sscience / sccience / sciience / scieence / sciennce / sciencce / sciencee / wcience / ecience / dcience / xcience / zcience / acience / qcience / sxience / ssience / sdience / sfience / svience / s ience / scence / sci3nce / sci4nce / scirnce / scifnce / scidnce / scisnce / sciwnce / sciebce / sciehce / sciejce / sciemce / scie ce / scienxe / sciense / sciende / scienfe / scienve / scien e / scienc3 / scienc4 / sciencr / sciencf / sciencd / sciencs / sciencw /