Infantilisms, Sexual
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  Infantilisms, Sexual



Infantilisms, Sexual

   Condition resulting from or characterized by abnormally decreased functional activity of the gonads, with retardation of growth and sexual development.

RELATED TERMS
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Condition
The term "condition" has a number of biomedical meanings including the following: 1.An unhealthy state, such as in "this is a progressive condition." 2.A state of fitness, such as "getting into condition." 3.Something that is essential to the occurrence of something else; essentially a "precondition." 4.As a verb: to cause a change in something so that a response that was previously associated with a certain stimulus becomes associated with another stimulus; to condition a person, as in behavioral conditioning.

Gonads
Ovaries and testes.

Retardation
Delay or halt of any process such as mental or physical development.

Sexual
Pertaining to sex or, more particularly, the stimulation, responsiveness, and functions of the sex organs either alone or with one or more partners.

Development
The process of growth and differentiation.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Infancy
Babyhood; the period of development between birth and the beginning of early childhood between the ages of two and three years.

Infanrix
Combined vaccines consisting of DIPHTHERIA TOXOID; TETANUS TOXOID; and an acellular form of PERTUSSIS VACCINE. At least five different purifed antigens of B. pertussis have been used in various combinations in these vaccines.

Infant
A child under a year of age.

Infant Behavior
Any observable response or action of a neonate or infant up through the age of 23 months.

Infant Care
Care of infants in the home or institution.

Infant Death, Sudden
The abrupt and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant under one year of age, remaining unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history. (Pediatr Pathol 1991 Sep-Oct;11(5):677-84)

Infant Development
The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of the child from birth up to but not including adolescence. It includes healthy responses to situations, but does not include growth in stature or size (= GROWTH).

Infant Diaper
Care of infants in the home or institution.

Infant Diapers
Care of infants in the home or institution.

Infant Equipment
Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.

Infant Food
Food processed and manufactured for the nutritional health of children in their first year of life.

Infant Foods
Food processed and manufactured for the nutritional health of children in their first year of life.

Infant Furniture
Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.

Infant Health
Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the infant.

Infant Health Service
Organized services to provide health care for children.

Infant Health Services
Organized services to provide health care for children.

Infant Incubator
Electrically powered devices that are intended to assist in the maintenance of the thermal balance of infants, principally by controlling the air temperature and humidity in an enclosure. (from UMDNS, 1999)

Infant Incubators
Electrically powered devices that are intended to assist in the maintenance of the thermal balance of infants, principally by controlling the air temperature and humidity in an enclosure. (from UMDNS, 1999)

Infant Mortalities
Perinatal, neonatal, and infant deaths in a given population.

Infant mortality
The death of an infant during the first year of life.

Infant Mortality
Perinatal, neonatal, and infant deaths in a given population.

Infant Nutrition
Nutrition of children from birth to 2 years of age.

Infant Nutrition Disorder
Malnutrition, occurring in infants ages 1 month to 24 months, which is due to insufficient intake of food, dietary nutrients, or a pathophysiologic condition which prevents the absorption and utilization of food. Growth and development are markedly affected.

Infant Nutrition Disorders
Malnutrition, occurring in infants ages 1 month to 24 months, which is due to insufficient intake of food, dietary nutrients, or a pathophysiologic condition which prevents the absorption and utilization of food. Growth and development are markedly affected.

Infant Psychology
The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.

Infant Radiant Warmer
Electrically powered devices that are intended to assist in the maintenance of the thermal balance of infants, principally by controlling the air temperature and humidity in an enclosure. (from UMDNS, 1999)

Infant Radiant Warmers
Electrically powered devices that are intended to assist in the maintenance of the thermal balance of infants, principally by controlling the air temperature and humidity in an enclosure. (from UMDNS, 1999)

Infant Service, Health
Organized services to provide health care for children.

Infant Services, Health
Organized services to provide health care for children.

Infant Stroller
Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.

Infant Strollers
Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.

Infant Swing
Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.

Infant Swings
Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.

Infant Walker
Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.

Infant Walkers
Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.

Infant Welfare
Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the infant.

Infant, Low Birth Weight
An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.

Infant, Low-Birth-Weight
An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.

Infant, Newborn
An infant during the first month after birth.

Infant, Newborn, Diseases
Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.

Infant, Newborn, Intensive Care
Continuous care and monitoring of newborn infants with life-threatening conditions, in any setting.

Infant, Newborn, Screening
The identification of selected parameters in newborn infants by various tests, examinations, or other procedures. Screening may be performed by clinical or laboratory measures. A screening test is designed to sort out healthy neonates (INFANT, NEWBORN) from those not well, but the screening test is not intended as a diagnostic device, rather instead as epidemiologic.

Infant, Postmature
An infant born at or after 42 weeks of gestation.

Infant, Premature
An infant born before 38 weeks of gestation.

Infant, Small for Gestational Age
An infant having a birth weight lower than expected for its gestational age.

Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1500 grams (3.3 lbs), regardless of gestational age.

Infant, Very-Low-Birth-Weight
An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1500 grams (3.3 lbs), regardless of gestational age.

Infanticide
The killing of infants at birth or soon after.

Infanticides
The killing of infants at birth or soon after.

Infantile Autism
A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-IV)

Infantile Autism, Early
A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-IV)

Infantile Botulism
A disease caused by potent protein NEUROTOXINS produced by CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM which interfere with the presynaptic release of ACETYLCHOLINE at the NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION. Clinical features include abdominal pain, vomiting, acute PARALYSIS (including respiratory paralysis), blurred vision, and DIPLOPIA. Botulism may be classified into several subtypes (e.g., food-borne, infant, wound, and others). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1208)

Infantile Canavan Disease
A rare neurodegenerative condition of infancy or childhood characterized by white matter vacuolization and demeylination that gives rise to a spongy appearance. Aspartoacylase deficiency leads to an accumulation of N-acetylaspartate in astrocytes. Inheritance may be autosomal recessive or the illness may occur sporadically. This illness occurs more frequently in individuals of Ashkenazic Jewish descent. The neonatal form features the onset of hypotonia and lethargy at birth, rapidly progressing to coma and death. The infantile form features developmental delay, DYSKINESIAS, hypotonia, spasticity, blindness, and megalencephaly. The juvenile form is characterized by ATAXIA; OPTIC ATROPHY; and DEMENTIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p944; Am J Med Genet 1988 Feb;29(2):463-71)

Infantile Cerebral Palsy, Diplegic
A heterogeneous group of nonprogressive motor disorders caused by chronic brain injuries that originate in the prenatal period, perinatal period, or first few years of life. The four major subtypes are spastic, athetoid, ataxic, and mixed cerebral palsy, with spastic forms being the most common. The motor disorder may range from difficulties with fine motor control to severe spasticity (see MUSCLE SPASTICITY) in all limbs. Spastic diplegia (Little disease) is the most common subtype, and is characterized by spasticity that is more prominent in the legs than in the arms. Pathologically, this condition may be associated with LEUKOMALACIA, PERIVENTRICULAR. (From Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Aug;40(8):520-7)

Infantile Cerebral Palsy, Monoplegic
A heterogeneous group of nonprogressive motor disorders caused by chronic brain injuries that originate in the prenatal period, perinatal period, or first few years of life. The four major subtypes are spastic, athetoid, ataxic, and mixed cerebral palsy, with spastic forms being the most common. The motor disorder may range from difficulties with fine motor control to severe spasticity (see MUSCLE SPASTICITY) in all limbs. Spastic diplegia (Little disease) is the most common subtype, and is characterized by spasticity that is more prominent in the legs than in the arms. Pathologically, this condition may be associated with LEUKOMALACIA, PERIVENTRICULAR. (From Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Aug;40(8):520-7)

Infantile Cerebral Palsy, Quadriplegic
A heterogeneous group of nonprogressive motor disorders caused by chronic brain injuries that originate in the prenatal period, perinatal period, or first few years of life. The four major subtypes are spastic, athetoid, ataxic, and mixed cerebral palsy, with spastic forms being the most common. The motor disorder may range from difficulties with fine motor control to severe spasticity (see MUSCLE SPASTICITY) in all limbs. Spastic diplegia (Little disease) is the most common subtype, and is characterized by spasticity that is more prominent in the legs than in the arms. Pathologically, this condition may be associated with LEUKOMALACIA, PERIVENTRICULAR. (From Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Aug;40(8):520-7)

Infantile Cortical Hyperostoses
A disease of young infants characterized by soft tissue swellings over the affected bones, fever, and irritability, and marked by periods of remission and exacerbation. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Infantile Cortical Hyperostosis
A disease of young infants characterized by soft tissue swellings over the affected bones, fever, and irritability, and marked by periods of remission and exacerbation. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Infantile Eczema
A chronic inflammatory genetically determined disease of the skin marked by increased ability to form reagin (IgE), with increased susceptibility to allergic rhinitis and asthma, and hereditary disposition to a lowered threshold for pruritus. It is manifested by lichenification, excoriation, and crusting, mainly on the flexural surfaces of the elbow and knee. In infants it is known as infantile eczema.

Infantile Form Sialuria
Autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorders caused by lysosomal membrane transport defects that result in accumulation of free sialic acid (N-ACETYLNEURAMINIC ACID) within the lysosomes. The two main clinical phenotypes, which are allelic variants of the SLC17A5 gene, are ISSD, a severe infantile form, or Salla disease, a slowly progressive adult form, named for the geographic area in Finland where the kindred first studied resided.

Infantile Form Sialurias
Autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorders caused by lysosomal membrane transport defects that result in accumulation of free sialic acid (N-ACETYLNEURAMINIC ACID) within the lysosomes. The two main clinical phenotypes, which are allelic variants of the SLC17A5 gene, are ISSD, a severe infantile form, or Salla disease, a slowly progressive adult form, named for the geographic area in Finland where the kindred first studied resided.

Infantile Fucosidosis
An autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of ALPHA-L-FUCOSIDASE activity resulting in an accumulation of fucose containing SPHINGOLIPIDS, GLYCOPROTEINS, and mucopolysaccharides (GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS) in lysosomes. The infantile form (type I) features psychomotor deterioration, MUSCLE SPASTICITY, coarse facial features, growth retardation, skeletal abnormalities, visceromegaly, SEIZURES, recurrent infections, and MACROGLOSSIA, with death occurring in the first decade of life. Juvenile fucosidosis (type II) is the more common variant and features a slowly progressive decline in neurologic function and angiokeratoma corporis diffusum. Type II survival may be through the fourth decade of life. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p87; Am J Med Genet 1991 Jan;38(1):111-31)

Infantile Gangliosidosis GM1
A form of gangliosidosis characterized by accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides in lysosomes caused by an absence or severe deficiency of the enzyme BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (type A1). The three phenotypes of this disorder are infantile (generalized), juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, hypotonia, poor psychomotor development, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features hyperacusis, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive intellectual deterioration, involuntary movements, ataxia, and spasticity. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)

Infantile Gaucher Disease
An autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase (see GLUCOSYLCERAMIDASE) featuring the pathological storage of glycosylceramide in mononuclear PHAGOCYTES (Gaucher Cells). The most common subtype is the non-neuronopathic form, a slowly progressive condition characterized by hepatosplenomegaly and skeletal deformities. The neuronopathic forms are divided into infantile and juvenile forms. The infantile form presents at 4-5 months of age with anemia, loss of cognitive gains, neck retraction, dysphagia, and hepatosplenomegaly. The juvenile form features a slowly progressive loss of intellect, hepatosplenomegaly, ATAXIA, myoclonic SEIZURES, and spasticity. The neuronopathic forms are characterized by neuronal loss with neuronophagia, and accumulation of glucocerebroside in neurons. (From Baillieres Clin Haematol 1997 Dec;10(4):711-23; Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p97)

Infantile Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy
An autosomal recessive inherited sphingolipidosis caused by a deficiency of GALACTOSYLCERAMIDASE leading to an accumulation of PSYCHOSINE in LYSOSOMES of the BRAIN; PERIPHERAL NERVES; LIVER; KIDNEY; and LEUKOCYTES. In the nervous sytem there is prominent central and peripheral demyelination. The infantile form presents at age 4-6 months with psychomotor retardation, MUSCLE SPASTICITY, and tonic spasms induced by minor stimuli. Death occurs within two years. Later onset forms of this disease are characterized by a less fulminant course. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp195-7)

Infantile Glycogen Storage Disease Type II
An autosomal recessively inherited glycogen storage disease caused by GLUCAN 1,4-ALPHA-GLUCOSIDASE DEFICIENCY. Large amounts of GLYCOGEN accumulate in the LYSOSOMES of skeletal muscle (MUSCLE, SKELETAL); HEART; LIVER; SPINAL CORD; and BRAIN. Three forms have been described: infantile, childhood, and adult. The infantile form is fatal in infancy and presents with hypotonia and a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CARDIOMYOPATHY, HYPERTROPHIC). The childhood form usually presents in the second year of life with proximal weakness and respiratory symptoms. The adult form consists of a slowly progressive proximal myopathy. (From Muscle Nerve 1995;3:S61-9; Menkes,Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp73-4)

Infantile Hemiplegia
Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body.

Infantile Hemiplegias
Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body.

Infantile Hypertonia
Abnormal increase in skeletal or smooth muscle tone. Skeletal muscle hypertonicity may be associated with PYRAMIDAL TRACT lesions or BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES.

Infantile Hypertonias
Abnormal increase in skeletal or smooth muscle tone. Skeletal muscle hypertonicity may be associated with PYRAMIDAL TRACT lesions or BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES.

Infantile Leigh Disease
A group of metabolic disorders primarily of infancy characterized by the subacute onset of psychomotor retardation, hypotonia, ataxia, weakness, vision loss, eye movement abnormalities, seizures, dysphagia, and lactic acidosis. Pathological features include spongy degeneration of the neuropile of the basal ganglia, thalamus, brain stem, and spinal cord. Patterns of inheritance include X-linked recessive, autosomal recessive, and mitochondrial. Leigh disease has been associated with mutations in genes for the PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX; CYTOCHROME-C OXIDASE; ATP synthase subunit 6; and subunits of mitochondrial complex I. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p850).

Infantile Neuroaxonal Dystrophies
A nonspecific term referring both to the pathologic finding of swelling of distal portions of axons in the brain and to disorders which feature this finding. Neuroaxonal dystrophy is seen in various genetic diseases, vitamin deficiencies, and aging. Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by arrested psychomotor development at 6 months to 2 years of age, ataxia, brain stem dysfunction, and quadriparesis. Juvenile and adult forms also occur. Pathologic findings include brain atrophy and widespread accumulation of axonal spheroids throughout the neuroaxis, peripheral nerves, and dental pulp. (From Davis & Robertson, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p927)

Infantile Neuroaxonal Dystrophy
A nonspecific term referring both to the pathologic finding of swelling of distal portions of axons in the brain and to disorders which feature this finding. Neuroaxonal dystrophy is seen in various genetic diseases, vitamin deficiencies, and aging. Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by arrested psychomotor development at 6 months to 2 years of age, ataxia, brain stem dysfunction, and quadriparesis. Juvenile and adult forms also occur. Pathologic findings include brain atrophy and widespread accumulation of axonal spheroids throughout the neuroaxis, peripheral nerves, and dental pulp. (From Davis & Robertson, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p927)

Infantile Papular Acrodermatitides
Inflammation involving the skin of the extremities, especially the hands and feet. Several forms are known, some idiopathic and some hereditary. The infantile form is called Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.

Infantile Papular Acrodermatitis
Inflammation involving the skin of the extremities, especially the hands and feet. Several forms are known, some idiopathic and some hereditary. The infantile form is called Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.

Infantile Paralysis
An acute infectious disease of humans, particularly children, caused by any of three serotypes of human poliovirus (POLIOVIRUS). Usually the infection is limited to the gastrointestinal tract and nasopharynx, and is often asymptomatic. The central nervous system, primarily the spinal cord, may be affected, leading to rapidly progressive paralysis, coarse FASCICULATION and hyporeflexia. Motor neurons are primarily affected. Encephalitis may also occur. The virus replicates in the nervous system, and may cause significant neuronal loss, most notably in the spinal cord. A rare related condition, nonpoliovirus poliomyelitis, may result from infections with nonpoliovirus enteroviruses. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp764-5)

Infantile Refsum Disease
A heterogeneous group of inherited metabolic disorders marked by absent or dysfunctional PEROXISOMES. Peroxisomal enzymatic abnormalities may be single or multiple. Biosynthetic peroxisomal pathways are compromised, including the ability to synthesize ether lipids and to oxidize long-chain fatty acid precursors. Diseases in this category include ZELLWEGER SYNDROME; infantile Refsum disease; rhizomelic chondrodysplasia (CHONDRODYSPLASIA PUNCTATA, RHIZOMELIC); hyperpipecolic acidemia; neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy; and ADRENOLEUKODYSTROPHY (X-linked). Neurologic dysfunction is a prominent feature of most peroxisomal disorders.

Infantile Refsums Disease
A heterogeneous group of inherited metabolic disorders marked by absent or dysfunctional PEROXISOMES. Peroxisomal enzymatic abnormalities may be single or multiple. Biosynthetic peroxisomal pathways are compromised, including the ability to synthesize ether lipids and to oxidize long-chain fatty acid precursors. Diseases in this category include ZELLWEGER SYNDROME; infantile Refsum disease; rhizomelic chondrodysplasia (CHONDRODYSPLASIA PUNCTATA, RHIZOMELIC); hyperpipecolic acidemia; neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy; and ADRENOLEUKODYSTROPHY (X-linked). Neurologic dysfunction is a prominent feature of most peroxisomal disorders.

Infantile Sandhoff Disease
An autosomal inherited disease caused by deficiency of the enzymes hexosaminidase A & B (see BETA-N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE) which leads to an accumulation of GM2 ganglioside and the sphingolipid globoside in neurons and other organs. Clinical manifestations resemble TAY-SACHS DISEASE, but the disease is not limited to Askenazi Jews and may feature hepatosplenomegaly. The infantile form presents in the first 4 months of life with psychomotor delay, hypotonia followed by spasticity, and cherry red spots in the macula. Rare juvenile and adult forms have been reported. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p92)

Infantile Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy
A clinically diverse group of epilepsy syndromes characterized either by myoclonic seizures or by myoclonus in association with other seizure types. Myoclonic epilepsy syndromes are divided into three subtypes based on etiology: familial, cryptogenic, and symptomatic (i.e., occurring secondary to known disease processes such as infections, hypoxic-ischemic injuries, trauma, etc.).

Infantile Sialic Acid Storage Disease
Autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorders caused by lysosomal membrane transport defects that result in accumulation of free sialic acid (N-ACETYLNEURAMINIC ACID) within the lysosomes. The two main clinical phenotypes, which are allelic variants of the SLC17A5 gene, are ISSD, a severe infantile form, or Salla disease, a slowly progressive adult form, named for the geographic area in Finland where the kindred first studied resided.

Infantile Spasm
An epileptic syndrome characterized by the triad of infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia, and arrest of psychomotor development at seizure onset. The majority present between 3-12 months of age, with spasms consisting of combinations of brief flexor or extensor movements of the head, trunk, and limbs. The condition is divided into two forms: cryptogenic (idiopathic) and symptomatic (secondary to a known disease process such as intrauterine infections; nervous system abnormalities; BRAIN DISEASES, METABOLIC, INBORN; prematurity; perinatal asphyxia; TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS; etc.). (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp744-8)

Infantile Spasm, Cryptogenic
An epileptic syndrome characterized by the triad of infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia, and arrest of psychomotor development at seizure onset. The majority present between 3-12 months of age, with spasms consisting of combinations of brief flexor or extensor movements of the head, trunk, and limbs. The condition is divided into two forms: cryptogenic (idiopathic) and symptomatic (secondary to a known disease process such as intrauterine infections; nervous system abnormalities; BRAIN DISEASES, METABOLIC, INBORN; prematurity; perinatal asphyxia; TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS; etc.). (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp744-8)

Infantile Spasm, Symptomatic
An epileptic syndrome characterized by the triad of infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia, and arrest of psychomotor development at seizure onset. The majority present between 3-12 months of age, with spasms consisting of combinations of brief flexor or extensor movements of the head, trunk, and limbs. The condition is divided into two forms: cryptogenic (idiopathic) and symptomatic (secondary to a known disease process such as intrauterine infections; nervous system abnormalities; BRAIN DISEASES, METABOLIC, INBORN; prematurity; perinatal asphyxia; TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS; etc.). (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp744-8)

Infantile Spasms
An epileptic syndrome characterized by the triad of infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia, and arrest of psychomotor development at seizure onset. The majority present between 3-12 months of age, with spasms consisting of combinations of brief flexor or extensor movements of the head, trunk, and limbs. The condition is divided into two forms: cryptogenic (idiopathic) and symptomatic (secondary to a known disease process such as intrauterine infections; nervous system abnormalities; BRAIN DISEASES, METABOLIC, INBORN; prematurity; perinatal asphyxia; TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS; etc.). (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp744-8)

Infantile Spasms, Cryptogenic
An epileptic syndrome characterized by the triad of infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia, and arrest of psychomotor development at seizure onset. The majority present between 3-12 months of age, with spasms consisting of combinations of brief flexor or extensor movements of the head, trunk, and limbs. The condition is divided into two forms: cryptogenic (idiopathic) and symptomatic (secondary to a known disease process such as intrauterine infections; nervous system abnormalities; BRAIN DISEASES, METABOLIC, INBORN; prematurity; perinatal asphyxia; TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS; etc.). (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp744-8)

Infantile Spasms, Symptomatic
An epileptic syndrome characterized by the triad of infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia, and arrest of psychomotor development at seizure onset. The majority present between 3-12 months of age, with spasms consisting of combinations of brief flexor or extensor movements of the head, trunk, and limbs. The condition is divided into two forms: cryptogenic (idiopathic) and symptomatic (secondary to a known disease process such as intrauterine infections; nervous system abnormalities; BRAIN DISEASES, METABOLIC, INBORN; prematurity; perinatal asphyxia; TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS; etc.). (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp744-8)

Infantile Spinal Muscular Atrophy
A group of recessively inherited diseases that feature progressive muscular atrophy and hypotonia. They are classified as type I (Werdnig-Hoffman disease), type II (intermediate form), and type III (Kugelberg-Welander disease). Type I is fatal in infancy, type II has a late infantile onset and is associated with survival into the second or third decade. Type III has its onset in childhood, and is slowly progressive. (J Med Genet 1996 Apr:33(4):281-3)

Infantile Subacute Necrotizing Encephalopathy
A group of metabolic disorders primarily of infancy characterized by the subacute onset of psychomotor retardation, hypotonia, ataxia, weakness, vision loss, eye movement abnormalities, seizures, dysphagia, and lactic acidosis. Pathological features include spongy degeneration of the neuropile of the basal ganglia, thalamus, brain stem, and spinal cord. Patterns of inheritance include X-linked recessive, autosomal recessive, and mitochondrial. Leigh disease has been associated with mutations in genes for the PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX; CYTOCHROME-C OXIDASE; ATP synthase subunit 6; and subunits of mitochondrial complex I. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p850).

Infantilism
The paraphilia of impersonating an infant and being treated as one by the partner; one of the stigmatic/eligibilic paraphilias. Synonym, autonepiophilia.

Infantilism, Genital
Condition resulting from or characterized by abnormally decreased functional activity of the gonads, with retardation of growth and sexual development.

Infantilism, Sexual
Condition resulting from or characterized by abnormally decreased functional activity of the gonads, with retardation of growth and sexual development.

Infantilisms, Genital
Condition resulting from or characterized by abnormally decreased functional activity of the gonads, with retardation of growth and sexual development.

Infants
A child between 1 and 23 months of age.

Infants feverall
Infants feverall is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): acetaminophen.

Infants, Low-Birth-Weight
An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.

Infants, Newborn
An infant during the first month after birth.

Infants, Postmature
An infant born at or after 42 weeks of gestation.

Infants, Premature
An infant born before 38 weeks of gestation.

Infants, Very-Low-Birth-Weight
An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1500 grams (3.3 lbs), regardless of gestational age.

Infarct
A localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by the occlusion of the blood vessels - either arterial supply or venous drainage.

Infarct, Myocardial
Gross necrosis of the myocardium, as a result of interruption of the blood supply to the area. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Infarction
Tissue death due to lack of oxygen-rich blood.

Infarction, Anterior Cerebral Circulation
The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (see CEREBRAL INFARCTION), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.

Infarction, Anterior Circulation, Brain
The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (see CEREBRAL INFARCTION), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.

Infarction, Brain
The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (see CEREBRAL INFARCTION), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.

Infarction, Brain Stem
Infarctions that occur in the brain stem which is comprised of the midbrain, pons, and medulla. There are several named syndromes characterized by their distinctive clinical manifestations and specific sites of ischemic injury.

Infarction, Brain Venous
The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (see CEREBRAL INFARCTION), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.

Infarction, Brain, Anterior Circulation
The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (see CEREBRAL INFARCTION), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.

Infarction, Brain, Posterior Circulation
The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (see CEREBRAL INFARCTION), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.

Infarction, Brainstem
Infarctions that occur in the brain stem which is comprised of the midbrain, pons, and medulla. There are several named syndromes characterized by their distinctive clinical manifestations and specific sites of ischemic injury.

Infarction, Cerebral
The formation of an area of necrosis in the cerebrum caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).

Infarction, Cerebral, Left Hemisphere
The formation of an area of necrosis in the cerebrum caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).

Infarction, Cerebral, Right Hemisphere
The formation of an area of necrosis in the cerebrum caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).

Infarction, Lacunar
The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (see CEREBRAL INFARCTION), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.

Infarction, Left Hemisphere, Cerebral
The formation of an area of necrosis in the cerebrum caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).

Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery
The formation of an area of coagulation necrosis in the vascular distribution of the middle cerebral artery secondary to ISCHEMIA. Clinical features include contralateral weakness and loss of sensation in the arm and face and a contralateral homonymous hemianopsia. Dominant hemisphere lesions may produce APHASIA, alexia, AGRAPHIA, acalculia, finger agnosia, and right-left confusion. Nondominant hemisphere lesions may produce unilateral neglect, dressing APRAXIA, anosognosia, and constructional apraxia. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p786)

Infarction, Myocardial
Gross necrosis of the myocardium, as a result of interruption of the blood supply to the area. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Infarction, PCA
Formation of an area of coagulation necrosis induced by ischemia in the vascular distribution of the posterior cerebral artery. This artery supplies portions of the MESENCEPHALON (see also BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS) and thalamus, inferomedial TEMPORAL LOBE, and medial OCCIPITAL LOBE. Clinical manifestations vary with the size and location of infarction, but include a variety of midbrain and thalamic syndromes, HEMIANOPSIA, and behavioral syndromes related to memory and processing visual information. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp793-8)

Infarction, Posterior Cerebral Artery
Formation of an area of coagulation necrosis induced by ischemia in the vascular distribution of the posterior cerebral artery. This artery supplies portions of the MESENCEPHALON (see also BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS) and thalamus, inferomedial TEMPORAL LOBE, and medial OCCIPITAL LOBE. Clinical manifestations vary with the size and location of infarction, but include a variety of midbrain and thalamic syndromes, HEMIANOPSIA, and behavioral syndromes related to memory and processing visual information. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp793-8)

Infarction, Posterior Circulation, Brain
The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (see CEREBRAL INFARCTION), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.

Infarction, Pulmonary
Embolism in the pulmonary artery or one of its branches.

Infarction, Right Hemisphere, Cerebral
The formation of an area of necrosis in the cerebrum caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).

Infarction, Splenic
Insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply to the spleen due to emboli, thrombi, vascular torsion, or pressure that produces a macroscopic area of necrosis. (From Stedman, 25th ed)

Infarction, Subcortical
The formation of an area of necrosis in the cerebrum caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).

Infarction, Venous Brain
The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (see CEREBRAL INFARCTION), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.

Infarctions
A pathological process consisting of a sudden insufficient blood supply to an area, which results in necrosis of that area. It is usually caused by a thrombus, an embolus, or a vascular torsion.

Infarctions, Brain
The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (see CEREBRAL INFARCTION), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.

Infarctions, Brain Stem
Infarctions that occur in the brain stem which is comprised of the midbrain, pons, and medulla. There are several named syndromes characterized by their distinctive clinical manifestations and specific sites of ischemic injury.

Infarctions, Brain Venous
The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (see CEREBRAL INFARCTION), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.

Infarctions, Brainstem
Infarctions that occur in the brain stem which is comprised of the midbrain, pons, and medulla. There are several named syndromes characterized by their distinctive clinical manifestations and specific sites of ischemic injury.

Infarctions, Cerebral
The formation of an area of necrosis in the cerebrum caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).

Infarctions, Lacunar
The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (see CEREBRAL INFARCTION), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.

Infarctions, Myocardial
Gross necrosis of the myocardium, as a result of interruption of the blood supply to the area. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Infarctions, Pulmonary
Embolism in the pulmonary artery or one of its branches.

Infarctions, Splenic
Insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply to the spleen due to emboli, thrombi, vascular torsion, or pressure that produces a macroscopic area of necrosis. (From Stedman, 25th ed)

Infarctions, Subcortical
The formation of an area of necrosis in the cerebrum caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).

Infarctions, Venous Brain
The formation of an area of necrosis in the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres (see CEREBRAL INFARCTION), thalami, basal ganglia, brain stem (BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS), or cerebellum secondary to an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow.

Infarcts, Myocardial
Gross necrosis of the myocardium, as a result of interruption of the blood supply to the area. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Infasurf preservative free
Infasurf preservative free is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): calfactant.

Infatuation
Foolish and extravagant passion, especially as applied to a love affair that does not meet with family or local community or religious approval, and does not conform to customary criteria of a well arranged marriage.



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Infantile Spasms, Cryptogenic
An epileptic syndrome characterized by the triad of infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia, and arrest of psychomotor development at seizure onset. The majority present between 3-12 months of age, with spasms consisting of combinations of brief flexor or extensor movements of the head, trunk, and limbs. The condition is divided into two forms: cryptogenic (idiopathic) and symptomatic (secondary to a known disease process such as intrauterine infections; nervous system abnormalities; BRAIN DISEASES, METABOLIC, INBORN; prematurity; perinatal asphyxia; TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS; etc.). (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp744-8)

Infantile Subacute Necrotizing Encephalopathy
A group of metabolic disorders primarily of infancy characterized by the subacute onset of psychomotor retardation, hypotonia, ataxia, weakness, vision loss, eye movement abnormalities, seizures, dysphagia, and lactic acidosis. Pathological features include spongy degeneration of the neuropile of the basal ganglia, thalamus, brain stem, and spinal cord. Patterns of inheritance include X-linked recessive, autosomal recessive, and mitochondrial. Leigh disease has been associated with mutations in genes for the PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX; CYTOCHROME-C OXIDASE; ATP synthase subunit 6; and subunits of mitochondrial complex I. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p850).

Infantile Spinal Muscular Atrophy
A group of recessively inherited diseases that feature progressive muscular atrophy and hypotonia. They are classified as type I (Werdnig-Hoffman disease), type II (intermediate form), and type III (Kugelberg-Welander disease). Type I is fatal in infancy, type II has a late infantile onset and is associated with survival into the second or third decade. Type III has its onset in childhood, and is slowly progressive. (J Med Genet 1996 Apr:33(4):281-3)

Infantilism, Sexual
Condition resulting from or characterized by abnormally decreased functional activity of the gonads, with retardation of growth and sexual development.

Infantilism, Genital
Condition resulting from or characterized by abnormally decreased functional activity of the gonads, with retardation of growth and sexual development.

Infantilisms, Sexual

Infantilisms, Genital
Condition resulting from or characterized by abnormally decreased functional activity of the gonads, with retardation of growth and sexual development.

Infants, Low-Birth-Weight
An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.

Infants
A child between 1 and 23 months of age.

Infants, Postmature
An infant born at or after 42 weeks of gestation.

Infants, Newborn
An infant during the first month after birth.

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