Histocompatibility
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  Histocompatibility



Histocompatibility

    Literally, the ability of tissues to get along; in immunology, it means identity in all transplantation antigens. These antigens, in turn, are collectively referred to as histocompatibility antigens.

RELATED TERMS
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Ability
The ability to acquire general or special types of knowledge or skill.

Immunology
The study of the body's natural defense system.

Transplantation
To transfer (tissue or an organ) from one body or body part to another.

Antigens
Substances that cause an immune response in the body. The body "sees" the antigens as harmful or foreign. To fight them, the body produces antibodies, which attack and try to eliminate the antigens.

Histocompatibility
Literally, the ability of tissues to get along; in immunology, it means identity in all transplantation antigens. These antigens, in turn, are collectively referred to as histocompatibility antigens.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Histacryl
A tissue adhesive that is applied as a monomer to moist tissue and polymerizes to form a bond. It is slowly biodegradable and used in all kinds of surgery, including dental.

Histafed
Histafed is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): pseudoephedrine hydrochloride; triprolidine hydrochloride.

Histalog
Histalog is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): betazole hydrochloride.

Histametizyn
A histamine H1 antagonist used in the treatment of motion sickness, vertigo, and nausea during pregnancy and radiation sickness.

Histaminase
A group of enzymes including those oxidizing primary monoamines, diamines, and histamine. They are copper proteins, and, as their action depends on a carbonyl group, they are sensitive to inhibition by semicarbazide. EC 1.4.3.6.

Histamine
A chemical present in cells throughout the body that is released during an allergic reaction and one of the substances responsible for the symptoms of inflammation.

Histamine Agents
Drugs used for their actions on histaminergic systems. Included are drugs that act at histamine receptors, affect the life cycle of histamine, or affect the state of histaminergic cells.

Histamine Agonist
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histamine Agonists
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histamine Antagonists
Drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. Classical antihistaminics block the histamine H1 receptors only.

Histamine Binding Sites
Cell-surface proteins that bind histamine and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Histamine receptors are widespread in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues. Three types have been recognized and designated H1, H2, and H3. They differ in pharmacology, distribution, and mode of action.

Histamine Cephalgia
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Histamine Cephalgias
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Histamine Dichloride
A depressor amine derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of histidine. It is a powerful stimulant of gastric secretion, a constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, a vasodilator, and also a centrally acting neurotransmitter.

Histamine Dihydrochloride
A depressor amine derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of histidine. It is a powerful stimulant of gastric secretion, a constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, a vasodilator, and also a centrally acting neurotransmitter.

Histamine Drugs
Drugs used for their actions on histaminergic systems. Included are drugs that act at histamine receptors, affect the life cycle of histamine, or affect the state of histaminergic cells.

Histamine H1 Agonist
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histamine H1 Agonists
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histamine H1 Antagonists
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.

Histamine H1 Blockers
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.

Histamine H1 Receptor
A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Most histamine H1 receptors operate through the inositol phosphate/diacylglycerol second messenger system. Among the many responses mediated by these receptors are smooth muscle contraction, increased vascular permeability, hormone release, and cerebral glyconeogenesis. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)

Histamine H1 Receptor Agonist
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histamine H1 Receptor Agonists
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histamine H1 Receptor Antagonists
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.

Histamine H1 Receptor Blockaders
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.

Histamine H1 Receptors
A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Most histamine H1 receptors operate through the inositol phosphate/diacylglycerol second messenger system. Among the many responses mediated by these receptors are smooth muscle contraction, increased vascular permeability, hormone release, and cerebral glyconeogenesis. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)

Histamine H2 Agonist
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histamine H2 Agonists
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histamine H2 Antagonists
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.

Histamine H2 Blockers
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.

Histamine H2 Receptor Agonist
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histamine H2 Receptor Agonists
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histamine H2 Receptor Antagonists
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.

Histamine H2 Receptor Blockaders
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.

Histamine H2 Receptors
A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Histamine H2 receptors act via G-proteins to stimulate adenylate cylase. Among the many responses mediated by these receptors are gastric acid secretion, smooth muscle relaxation, inotropic and chronotropic effects on heart muscle, and inhibition of lymphocyte function. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)

Histamine H3 Agonist
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histamine H3 Agonists
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histamine H3 Receptor
A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Histamine H3 receptors were first recognized as inhibitory autoreceptors on histamine-containing nerve terminals and have since been shown to regulate the release of several neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)

Histamine H3 Receptor Agonists
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histamine H3 Receptors
A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Histamine H3 receptors were first recognized as inhibitory autoreceptors on histamine-containing nerve terminals and have since been shown to regulate the release of several neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)

Histamine Methyltransferase
An enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to histamine, forming N-methylhistamine, the major metabolite of histamine in man. EC 2.1.1.8.

Histamine N Methyltransferase
An enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to histamine, forming N-methylhistamine, the major metabolite of histamine in man. EC 2.1.1.8.

Histamine N-Methyltransferase
An enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to histamine, forming N-methylhistamine, the major metabolite of histamine in man. EC 2.1.1.8.

Histamine phosphate
Histamine phosphate is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): histamine phosphate.

Histamine Producing Cell Stimulating Factor
An acidic glycoprotein of MW 23 kDa with internal disulfide bonds. The protein is produced in response to a number of inflammatory mediators by mesenchymal cells present in the hemopoietic environment and at peripheral sites of inflammation. GM-CSF is able to stimulate the production of neutrophilic granulocytes, macrophages, and mixed granulocyte-macrophage colonies from bone marrow cells and can stimulate the formation of eosinophil colonies from fetal liver progenitor cells. GM-CSF can also stimulate some functional activities in mature granulocytes and macrophages.

Histamine Receptor
Cell-surface proteins that bind histamine and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Histamine receptors are widespread in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues. Three types have been recognized and designated H1, H2, and H3. They differ in pharmacology, distribution, and mode of action.

Histamine Receptors
Cell-surface proteins that bind histamine and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Histamine receptors are widespread in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues. Three types have been recognized and designated H1, H2, and H3. They differ in pharmacology, distribution, and mode of action.

Histamine Sensitizing Factor
Any of various biologically active proteins or toxins elaborated by Bordetella pertussis that cause the symptoms of whooping cough. Some activate pancreatic islets, others inhibit the adenylate cyclase cascade and some cause lymphocytosis.

Histamine-Producing Cell-Stimulating Factor
An acidic glycoprotein of MW 23 kDa with internal disulfide bonds. The protein is produced in response to a number of inflammatory mediators by mesenchymal cells present in the hemopoietic environment and at peripheral sites of inflammation. GM-CSF is able to stimulate the production of neutrophilic granulocytes, macrophages, and mixed granulocyte-macrophage colonies from bone marrow cells and can stimulate the formation of eosinophil colonies from fetal liver progenitor cells. GM-CSF can also stimulate some functional activities in mature granulocytes and macrophages.

Histamine-Sensitizing Factor
Any of various biologically active proteins or toxins elaborated by Bordetella pertussis that cause the symptoms of whooping cough. Some activate pancreatic islets, others inhibit the adenylate cyclase cascade and some cause lymphocytosis.

Histaminergic Agents
Drugs used for their actions on histaminergic systems. Included are drugs that act at histamine receptors, affect the life cycle of histamine, or affect the state of histaminergic cells.

Histaminergic Agonist
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histaminergic Agonists
Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.

Histaminergic Drugs
Drugs used for their actions on histaminergic systems. Included are drugs that act at histamine receptors, affect the life cycle of histamine, or affect the state of histaminergic cells.

Histapyridamine
One of the HISTAMINE H1 ANTAGONISTS with little sedative action. It is used in treatment of hay fever, rhinitis, allergic dermatoses, and pruritus.

Histidase
An enzyme that catalyzes the first step of histidine catabolism, forming UROCANIC ACID and AMMONIA from HISTIDINE. Deficiency of this enzyme is associated with elevated levels of serum histidine. EC 4.3.1.3.

Histidinase
An enzyme that catalyzes the first step of histidine catabolism, forming UROCANIC ACID and AMMONIA from HISTIDINE. Deficiency of this enzyme is associated with elevated levels of serum histidine. EC 4.3.1.3.

Histidine
An essential amino acid that is required for the production of HISTAMINE.

Histidine alpha Deaminase
An enzyme that catalyzes the first step of histidine catabolism, forming UROCANIC ACID and AMMONIA from HISTIDINE. Deficiency of this enzyme is associated with elevated levels of serum histidine. EC 4.3.1.3.

Histidine alpha-Deaminase
An enzyme that catalyzes the first step of histidine catabolism, forming UROCANIC ACID and AMMONIA from HISTIDINE. Deficiency of this enzyme is associated with elevated levels of serum histidine. EC 4.3.1.3.

Histidine Ammonia Lyase
An enzyme that catalyzes the first step of histidine catabolism, forming UROCANIC ACID and AMMONIA from HISTIDINE. Deficiency of this enzyme is associated with elevated levels of serum histidine. EC 4.3.1.3.

Histidine Ammonia-Lyase
An enzyme that catalyzes the first step of histidine catabolism, forming UROCANIC ACID and AMMONIA from HISTIDINE. Deficiency of this enzyme is associated with elevated levels of serum histidine. EC 4.3.1.3.

Histidine Carboxy Lyase
An enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation of histidine to histamine and carbon dioxide. It requires pyridoxal phosphate in animal tissues, but not in microorganisms. EC 4.1.1.22.

Histidine Carboxy-Lyase
An enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation of histidine to histamine and carbon dioxide. It requires pyridoxal phosphate in animal tissues, but not in microorganisms. EC 4.1.1.22.

Histidine Deaminase
An enzyme that catalyzes the first step of histidine catabolism, forming UROCANIC ACID and AMMONIA from HISTIDINE. Deficiency of this enzyme is associated with elevated levels of serum histidine. EC 4.3.1.3.

Histidine Decarboxylase
An enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation of histidine to histamine and carbon dioxide. It requires pyridoxal phosphate in animal tissues, but not in microorganisms. EC 4.1.1.22.

Histidine Methionine, Peptide
A 27-amino acid peptide with histidine at the N-terminal and isoleucine amide at the C-terminal. The exact amino acid composition of the peptide is species dependent. The peptide is secreted in the intestine, but is found in the nervous system, many organs, and in the majority of peripheral tissues. It has a wide range of biological actions, affecting the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and central nervous systems.

Histidine Specific tRNA
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying histidine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.

Histidine tRNA Ligase
An enzyme that activates histidine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.21.

Histidine, L isomer
An essential amino acid that is required for the production of HISTAMINE.

Histidine, L-isomer
An essential amino acid that is required for the production of HISTAMINE.

Histidine-Isoleucine, Peptide
A 27-amino acid peptide with histidine at the N-terminal and isoleucine amide at the C-terminal. The exact amino acid composition of the peptide is species dependent. The peptide is secreted in the intestine, but is found in the nervous system, many organs, and in the majority of peripheral tissues. It has a wide range of biological actions, affecting the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and central nervous systems.

Histidine-Specific tRNA
A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying histidine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.

Histidine-tRNA Ligase
An enzyme that activates histidine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.21.

Histidinol
The penultimate step in the pathway of histidine biosynthesis. Oxidation of the alcohol group on the side chain gives the acid group forming histidine. Histidinol has also been used as an inhibitor of protein synthesis.

Histidinol Phosphate Phosphatase
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of histidinol-phosphate to histidinol. One of the regulatory enzymes in histidine biosynthesis. EC 3.1.3.15.

Histidinol-Phosphatase
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of histidinol-phosphate to histidinol. One of the regulatory enzymes in histidine biosynthesis. EC 3.1.3.15.

Histidinolphosphatase
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of histidinol-phosphate to histidinol. One of the regulatory enzymes in histidine biosynthesis. EC 3.1.3.15.

Histidol
The penultimate step in the pathway of histidine biosynthesis. Oxidation of the alcohol group on the side chain gives the acid group forming histidine. Histidinol has also been used as an inhibitor of protein synthesis.

Histidyl T RNA Synthetase
An enzyme that activates histidine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.21.

Histidyl tRNA Synthetase
An enzyme that activates histidine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.21.

Histidyl-tRNA Synthetase
An enzyme that activates histidine with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.21.

Histiocyte
A large, phagocytic cell of the reticuloendothelial system; a macrophage.

Histiocyte Syndrome, Sea Blue
Rare disorder consisting of splenomegaly, mild purpura secondary to thrombocytopenia, and occasionally, hepatic cirrhosis associated with the appearance of numerous histiocytes in the spleen and bone marrow which stain a sea-blue color.

Histiocyte Syndrome, Sea-Blue
Rare disorder consisting of splenomegaly, mild purpura secondary to thrombocytopenia, and occasionally, hepatic cirrhosis associated with the appearance of numerous histiocytes in the spleen and bone marrow which stain a sea-blue color.

Histiocyte Syndromes, Sea Blue
Rare disorder consisting of splenomegaly, mild purpura secondary to thrombocytopenia, and occasionally, hepatic cirrhosis associated with the appearance of numerous histiocytes in the spleen and bone marrow which stain a sea-blue color.

Histiocyte Syndromes, Sea-Blue
Rare disorder consisting of splenomegaly, mild purpura secondary to thrombocytopenia, and occasionally, hepatic cirrhosis associated with the appearance of numerous histiocytes in the spleen and bone marrow which stain a sea-blue color.

Histiocytic Disorder, Malignant
Distinctive neoplastic disorders of histiocytes. Included are acute monocytic leukemias, malignant histiocytosis (HISTIOCYTOSIS, MALIGNANT), and true histiocytic lymphomas.

Histiocytic Disorders, Malignant
Distinctive neoplastic disorders of histiocytes. Included are acute monocytic leukemias, malignant histiocytosis (HISTIOCYTOSIS, MALIGNANT), and true histiocytic lymphomas.

Histiocytic Lymphoma
The most common aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. It occurs in both diffuse and nodular form. The large cells may have cleaved and non-cleaved nuclei.

Histiocytic Lymphoma, Diffuse
Malignant lymphoma composed of large cells which may be both cleaved and noncleaved. The pattern is predominantly diffuse. Most of these lymphomas represent the malignant counterpart of B-lymphocytes at midstage in the process of differentiation.

Histiocytic Lymphoma, Nodular
Malignant lymphoma in which the majority of neoplastic cells within the follicles are large cleaved or noncleaved cells. The degree to which the follicular center cells retain their ability to form follicles varies with the state of B-cell transformation.

Histiocytic Lymphomas
The most common aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. It occurs in both diffuse and nodular form. The large cells may have cleaved and non-cleaved nuclei.

Histiocytic Lymphomas, Diffuse
Malignant lymphoma composed of large cells which may be both cleaved and noncleaved. The pattern is predominantly diffuse. Most of these lymphomas represent the malignant counterpart of B-lymphocytes at midstage in the process of differentiation.

Histiocytic Lymphomas, Nodular
Malignant lymphoma in which the majority of neoplastic cells within the follicles are large cleaved or noncleaved cells. The degree to which the follicular center cells retain their ability to form follicles varies with the state of B-cell transformation.

Histiocytic Medullary Reticuloses
A rare, usually rapidly progressive disorder, characterized by abrupt onset, fever, weight loss, hepato-splenomegaly, pancytopenia, and lymphadenopathy.

Histiocytic Medullary Reticulosis
A rare, usually rapidly progressive disorder, characterized by abrupt onset, fever, weight loss, hepato-splenomegaly, pancytopenia, and lymphadenopathy.

Histiocytic Necrotizing Lymphadenitis
Development of lesions in the lymph node characterized by infiltration of the cortex or paracortex by large collections of proliferating histiocytes and complete or, more often, incomplete necrosis of lymphoid tissue.

Histiocytoid Hemangioma
An extremely common benign tumor, occurring most commonly in infancy and childhood, made up of newly formed blood vessels, and resulting from malformation of angioblastic tissue of fetal life. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. About 75% are present at birth, and about 60% occur in the head and neck area. The majority in infancy will regress spontaneously. Some hemangiomas grow rapidly during the early months of life and may be a source of some concern, although virtually all disappear by about 5 years of age. They do not metastasize and simple excision will often be curative. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1355)

Histiocytoid Hemangiomas
An extremely common benign tumor, occurring most commonly in infancy and childhood, made up of newly formed blood vessels, and resulting from malformation of angioblastic tissue of fetal life. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. About 75% are present at birth, and about 60% occur in the head and neck area. The majority in infancy will regress spontaneously. Some hemangiomas grow rapidly during the early months of life and may be a source of some concern, although virtually all disappear by about 5 years of age. They do not metastasize and simple excision will often be curative. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1355)

Histiocytoma
A common neoplasm of young dogs composed of round histiocytic cells, thought to be Langerhan's cells. Most tumors spontaneously regress.

Histiocytoma, Fibrous
A tumor composed, wholly or in part, of cells with the morphologic characteristics of histiocytes and with various fibroblastic components. There are many variants and many names. Superficially located histiocytic lesions behave benignly but deep, benign histiocytomas may invade locally into surrounding tissue. Fibrous histiocytomas can occur anywhere in the body. Superficial lesions are always cured by simple excision; a wider margin of tissue should be obtained for deep, benign types. Local recurrence is uncommon. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1356)

Histiocytomas
A slowly growing benign skin nodule consisting of poorly demarcated cellular fibrous tissue enclosing collapsed capillaries with scattered hemosiderin-pigmented and lipid macrophages. They are common, usually about 1 cm in diameter and occur in the dermis. Simple excision is always curative. (From Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1356)

Histiocytomas, Fibrous
A tumor composed, wholly or in part, of cells with the morphologic characteristics of histiocytes and with various fibroblastic components. There are many variants and many names. Superficially located histiocytic lesions behave benignly but deep, benign histiocytomas may invade locally into surrounding tissue. Fibrous histiocytomas can occur anywhere in the body. Superficial lesions are always cured by simple excision; a wider margin of tissue should be obtained for deep, benign types. Local recurrence is uncommon. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1356)

Histiocytoses
General term for the abnormal appearance of histiocytes in the blood. Based on the pathological features of the cells involved rather than on clinical findings, the histiocytic diseases are subdivided into three groups: HISTIOCYTOSIS, LANGERHANS CELL; HISTIOCYTOSIS, NON-LANGERHANS CELL; and HISTIOCYTIC DISORDERS, MALIGNANT.

Histiocytoses, Generalized
Acute, disseminated, rapidly progressive form of Langerhans-cell histiocytosis.

Histiocytoses, Malignant
A rare, usually rapidly progressive disorder, characterized by abrupt onset, fever, weight loss, hepato-splenomegaly, pancytopenia, and lymphadenopathy.

Histiocytoses, Sea Blue
Rare disorder consisting of splenomegaly, mild purpura secondary to thrombocytopenia, and occasionally, hepatic cirrhosis associated with the appearance of numerous histiocytes in the spleen and bone marrow which stain a sea-blue color.

Histiocytoses, Sea-Blue
Rare disorder consisting of splenomegaly, mild purpura secondary to thrombocytopenia, and occasionally, hepatic cirrhosis associated with the appearance of numerous histiocytes in the spleen and bone marrow which stain a sea-blue color.

Histiocytoses, Sinus
Benign, non-Langerhans-cell, histiocytic proliferative disorder that primarily affects the lymph nodes. It is often referred to as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy.

Histiocytosis
General term for the abnormal appearance of histiocytes in the blood. Based on the pathological features of the cells involved rather than on clinical findings, the histiocytic diseases are subdivided into three groups: HISTIOCYTOSIS, LANGERHANS CELL; HISTIOCYTOSIS, NON-LANGERHANS CELL; and HISTIOCYTIC DISORDERS, MALIGNANT.

Histiocytosis X
Group of disorders of histiocyte proliferation which includes LETTERER-SIWE DISEASE; HAND-SCHUELLER-CHRISTIAN SYNDROME; and EOSINOPHILIC GRANULOMA. Langerhans cells are components of the lesions.

Histiocytosis, Generalized
Acute, disseminated, rapidly progressive form of Langerhans-cell histiocytosis.

Histiocytosis, Langerhans Cell
Group of disorders of histiocyte proliferation which includes LETTERER-SIWE DISEASE; HAND-SCHUELLER-CHRISTIAN SYNDROME; and EOSINOPHILIC GRANULOMA. Langerhans cells are components of the lesions.

Histiocytosis, Langerhans-Cell
Group of disorders of histiocyte proliferation which includes LETTERER-SIWE DISEASE; HAND-SCHUELLER-CHRISTIAN SYNDROME; and EOSINOPHILIC GRANULOMA. Langerhans cells are components of the lesions.

Histiocytosis, Malignant
A rare, usually rapidly progressive disorder, characterized by abrupt onset, fever, weight loss, hepato-splenomegaly, pancytopenia, and lymphadenopathy.

Histiocytosis, Non Langerhans Cell
Group of disorders which feature accumulations of active histiocytes and lymphocytes, but where the histiocytes are not Langerhans cells. The group includes hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, infection-associated hemophagocytic syndrome, sinus histiocytosis, xanthogranuloma, reticulohistiocytoma, juvenile xanthoma, xanthoma disseminatum, as well as the lipid storage diseases (sea-blue histiocyte syndrome and Niemann-Pick disease).

Histiocytosis, Non-Langerhans-Cell
Group of disorders which feature accumulations of active histiocytes and lymphocytes, but where the histiocytes are not Langerhans cells. The group includes hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, infection-associated hemophagocytic syndrome, sinus histiocytosis, xanthogranuloma, reticulohistiocytoma, juvenile xanthoma, xanthoma disseminatum, as well as the lipid storage diseases (sea-blue histiocyte syndrome and Niemann-Pick disease).

Histiocytosis, Sea Blue
Rare disorder consisting of splenomegaly, mild purpura secondary to thrombocytopenia, and occasionally, hepatic cirrhosis associated with the appearance of numerous histiocytes in the spleen and bone marrow which stain a sea-blue color.

Histiocytosis, Sea-Blue
Rare disorder consisting of splenomegaly, mild purpura secondary to thrombocytopenia, and occasionally, hepatic cirrhosis associated with the appearance of numerous histiocytes in the spleen and bone marrow which stain a sea-blue color.

Histiocytosis, Sinus
Benign, non-Langerhans-cell, histiocytic proliferative disorder that primarily affects the lymph nodes. It is often referred to as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy.

Histiocytosis-X
Includes eosinophilic granuloma, Hand-Schuller-Christian disease and Letterer-Siwe disease.

Histoacryl
A tissue adhesive that is applied as a monomer to moist tissue and polymerizes to form a bond. It is slowly biodegradable and used in all kinds of surgery, including dental.

Histochemical Effect
Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.

Histochemical Effects
Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.

Histocompatibilities
The degree of antigenic similarity between the tissues of different individuals, which determines the acceptance or rejection of allografts.

Histocompatibility Antigen
A group of antigens that includes both the major and minor histocompatibility antigens. The former are genetically determined by the major histocompatibility complex. They determine tissue type for transplantation and cause allograft rejections. The latter are systems of allelic alloantigens that can cause weak transplant rejection.

Histocompatibility Antigen DNA Probes
DNA probes specific for the human leukocyte antigen genes, which represent the major histocompatibility determinants in humans. The four known loci are designated as A, B, C, and D. Specific antigens are identified by a locus notation and number, e.g., HLA-A11. The inheritance of certain HLA alleles is associated with increased risk for certain diseases (e.g., insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus).

Histocompatibility Antigens
A group of antigens that includes both the major and minor histocompatibility antigens. The former are genetically determined by the major histocompatibility complex. They determine tissue type for transplantation and cause allograft rejections. The latter are systems of allelic alloantigens that can cause weak transplant rejection.

Histocompatibility Antigens Class I
Large transmembrane, polymorphic glycoproteins noncovalently associated with nonpolymorphic beta 2-microglobulin. In humans, three structural genes on chromosome 6 code for the HLA-A; HLA-B and HLA-C antigens. In mice, three genes named K, D, and L on chromosome 17 code for the H-2 antigens. Class I antigens are found on most nucleated cells and are generally detected by their reactivity with alloantisera. These antigens are recognized during graft rejection and restrict cell-mediated lysis of virus-infected cells. They are primarily associated with rheumatologic diseases and certain malignant disorders.

Histocompatibility Antigens Class II
Large, transmembrane, non-covalently linked glycoproteins (alpha and beta). Both chains can be polymorphic although there is more structural variation in the beta chains. The class II antigens in humans are called HLA-D ANTIGENS and are coded by a gene on chromosome 6. In mice, two genes named IA and IE on chromosome 17 code for the H-2 antigens. The antigens are found on B-lymphocytes, macrophages, epidermal cells, and sperm and are thought to mediate the competence of and cellular cooperation in the immune response. The term IA antigens used to refer only to the proteins encoded by the IA genes in the mouse, but is now used as a generic term for any class II histocompatibility antigen.

Histocompatibility Antigens, Minor
Allelic alloantigens often responsible for weak graft rejection in cases when (major) histocompatibility has been established by standard tests. In the mouse they are coded by more than 500 genes at up to 30 minor histocompatibility loci. The most well-known minor histocompatibility antigen in mammals is the H-Y antigen.

Histocompatibility Complex
The genetic region which contains the loci of genes which determine the structure of the serologically defined (SD) and lymphocyte-defined (LD) transplantation antigens, genes which control the structure of the immune response-associated (Ia) antigens, the immune response (Ir) genes which control the ability of an animal to respond immunologically to antigenic stimuli, and genes which determine the structure and/or level of the first four components of complement.

Histocompatibility Complex, Major
The genetic region which contains the loci of genes which determine the structure of the serologically defined (SD) and lymphocyte-defined (LD) transplantation antigens, genes which control the structure of the immune response-associated (Ia) antigens, the immune response (Ir) genes which control the ability of an animal to respond immunologically to antigenic stimuli, and genes which determine the structure and/or level of the first four components of complement.

Histocompatibility Complices
The genetic region which contains the loci of genes which determine the structure of the serologically defined (SD) and lymphocyte-defined (LD) transplantation antigens, genes which control the structure of the immune response-associated (Ia) antigens, the immune response (Ir) genes which control the ability of an animal to respond immunologically to antigenic stimuli, and genes which determine the structure and/or level of the first four components of complement.

Histocompatibility Complices, Major
The genetic region which contains the loci of genes which determine the structure of the serologically defined (SD) and lymphocyte-defined (LD) transplantation antigens, genes which control the structure of the immune response-associated (Ia) antigens, the immune response (Ir) genes which control the ability of an animal to respond immunologically to antigenic stimuli, and genes which determine the structure and/or level of the first four components of complement.

Histocompatibility Loci, Minor
Genetic loci responsible for the encoding of histocompatibility antigens other than those encoded by the major histocompatibility complex. The antigens encoded by these genes are often responsible for graft rejection in cases where histocompatibility has been established by standard tests. The location of some of these loci on the X and Y chromosomes explains why grafts from males to females may be rejected while grafts from females to males are accepted. In the mouse roughly 30 minor histocompatibility loci have been recognized, comprising more than 500 genes.

Histocompatibility Locus, Minor
Genetic loci responsible for the encoding of histocompatibility antigens other than those encoded by the major histocompatibility complex. The antigens encoded by these genes are often responsible for graft rejection in cases where histocompatibility has been established by standard tests. The location of some of these loci on the X and Y chromosomes explains why grafts from males to females may be rejected while grafts from females to males are accepted. In the mouse roughly 30 minor histocompatibility loci have been recognized, comprising more than 500 genes.

Histocompatibility Peptides, Minor
Allelic alloantigens often responsible for weak graft rejection in cases when (major) histocompatibility has been established by standard tests. In the mouse they are coded by more than 500 genes at up to 30 minor histocompatibility loci. The most well-known minor histocompatibility antigen in mammals is the H-Y antigen.

Histocompatibility Testing
Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant donors and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for histocompatibility antigens in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)

Histocompatibility Testings
Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant donors and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for histocompatibility antigens in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)

Histocytochemistry
Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.

Histocytologic Preparation Technic
Methods of preparing cells or tissues for examination and study of their origin, structure, function, or pathology. The methods include preservation, fixation, sectioning, staining, replica, or other technique to allow for viewing using a microscope.

Histocytologic Preparation Technics
Methods of preparing cells or tissues for examination and study of their origin, structure, function, or pathology. The methods include preservation, fixation, sectioning, staining, replica, or other technique to allow for viewing using a microscope.

Histocytologic Preparation Technique
Methods of preparing cells or tissues for examination and study of their origin, structure, function, or pathology. The methods include preservation, fixation, sectioning, staining, replica, or other technique to allow for viewing using a microscope.

Histocytologic Preparation Techniques
Methods of preparing cells or tissues for examination and study of their origin, structure, function, or pathology. The methods include preservation, fixation, sectioning, staining, replica, or other technique to allow for viewing using a microscope.

Histocytological Preparation Technic
Methods of preparing cells or tissues for examination and study of their origin, structure, function, or pathology. The methods include preservation, fixation, sectioning, staining, replica, or other technique to allow for viewing using a microscope.

Histocytological Preparation Technics
Methods of preparing cells or tissues for examination and study of their origin, structure, function, or pathology. The methods include preservation, fixation, sectioning, staining, replica, or other technique to allow for viewing using a microscope.

Histocytological Preparation Technique
Methods of preparing cells or tissues for examination and study of their origin, structure, function, or pathology. The methods include preservation, fixation, sectioning, staining, replica, or other technique to allow for viewing using a microscope.

Histocytological Preparation Techniques
Methods of preparing cells or tissues for examination and study of their origin, structure, function, or pathology. The methods include preservation, fixation, sectioning, staining, replica, or other technique to allow for viewing using a microscope.

Histodil
A histamine congener, it competitively inhibits histamine binding to H2 receptors. Cimetidine has a range of pharmacological actions. It inhibits gastric acid secretion, as well as pepsin and gastrin output. It also blocks the activity of cytochrome P-450.

Histological Labeling
The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.

Histological Labelings
The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.

Histological Type of Neoplasm
A collective term for the various histological types of NEOPLASMS. It is more likely to be used by searchers than by indexers and catalogers.

Histological Types of Neoplasms
A collective term for the various histological types of NEOPLASMS. It is more likely to be used by searchers than by indexers and catalogers.

Histology
The study of the structure and behavior of cells and body tissues, usually involving microscopic examination of tissue slices.

Histomoniases
Infections with unicellular organisms of the subkingdom PROTOZOA.

Histomoniasis
Infections with unicellular organisms of the subkingdom PROTOZOA.

Histone
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.

Histone (Arginine) Methyltransferase
An enzyme that catalyzes the methylation of arginine residues of proteins to yield N-mono- and N,N-dimethylarginine. This enzyme is found in many organs, primarily brain and spleen. EC 2.1.1.23.

Histone Deacetylase
Hydrolyzes N-acetyl groups on histones.

Histone H1
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.

Histone H1 Kinase, Growth Associated
Protein kinase that drives both the mitotic and meiotic cycles in all eukaryotic organisms. In meiosis it induces immature oocytes to undergo meiotic maturation. In mitosis it has a role in the G2/M phase transition. Once activated by CYCLINS; MPF directly phosphorylates some of the proteins involved in nuclear envelope breakdown, chromosome condensation, spindle assembly, and the degradation of cyclins. The catalytic subunit of MPF is PROTEIN P34CDC2.

Histone H1 Kinase, Growth-Associated
Protein kinase that drives both the mitotic and meiotic cycles in all eukaryotic organisms. In meiosis it induces immature oocytes to undergo meiotic maturation. In mitosis it has a role in the G2/M phase transition. Once activated by CYCLINS; MPF directly phosphorylates some of the proteins involved in nuclear envelope breakdown, chromosome condensation, spindle assembly, and the degradation of cyclins. The catalytic subunit of MPF is PROTEIN P34CDC2.

Histone H1 Kinase, M Phase Specific
Protein kinase that drives both the mitotic and meiotic cycles in all eukaryotic organisms. In meiosis it induces immature oocytes to undergo meiotic maturation. In mitosis it has a role in the G2/M phase transition. Once activated by CYCLINS; MPF directly phosphorylates some of the proteins involved in nuclear envelope breakdown, chromosome condensation, spindle assembly, and the degradation of cyclins. The catalytic subunit of MPF is PROTEIN P34CDC2.

Histone H1 Kinase, M-Phase-Specific
Protein kinase that drives both the mitotic and meiotic cycles in all eukaryotic organisms. In meiosis it induces immature oocytes to undergo meiotic maturation. In mitosis it has a role in the G2/M phase transition. Once activated by CYCLINS; MPF directly phosphorylates some of the proteins involved in nuclear envelope breakdown, chromosome condensation, spindle assembly, and the degradation of cyclins. The catalytic subunit of MPF is PROTEIN P34CDC2.

Histone H1(s)
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.

Histone H2a
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.

Histone H2b
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.

Histone H3
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.

Histone H3.3
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.

Histone H4
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.

Histone H5
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.

Histone H7
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.

Histone Kinase
An aspect of protein kinase (EC 2.7.1.37) in which serine residues in protamines and histones are phosphorylated in the presence of ATP. EC 2.7.1.70.

Histone Kinase p34(cdc2)
Phosphoprotein with protein kinase activity that functions in the G2/M phase transition of the cell cycle. It is the catalytic subunit of the MATURATION-PROMOTING FACTOR and complexes with both CYCLIN A and CYCLIN B in mammalian cells. The maximal activity of p34cdc2 is achieved when it is fully dephosphorylated. Protein p34cdc2, the product of the cdc2 gene in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, should not be confused with the unrelated product of the CDC2 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that forms the large subunit of DNA polymerase III.

Histone Lysine Methyltransferase
An enzyme that catalyzes the methylation of the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues in proteins to yield epsilon mono-, di-, and trimethyllysine. EC 2.1.1.43.

Histone Lysine N Methyltransferase
An enzyme that catalyzes the methylation of the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues in proteins to yield epsilon mono-, di-, and trimethyllysine. EC 2.1.1.43.

Histone Phosphatase, Phosphotyrosyl
An enzyme group that specifically dephosphorylates phosphotyrosyl residues in selected proteins. Together with PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE, it regulates tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in cellular signal transduction and may play a role in cell growth control and carcinogenesis. EC 3.1.3.48.

Histone-Lysine Methyltransferase
An enzyme that catalyzes the methylation of the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues in proteins to yield epsilon mono-, di-, and trimethyllysine. EC 2.1.1.43.

Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase
An enzyme that catalyzes the methylation of the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues in proteins to yield epsilon mono-, di-, and trimethyllysine. EC 2.1.1.43.

Histones
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.

Histoplasma
A mitosporic Onygenales fungal species causing HISTOPLASMOSIS in humans and animals. Histoplasma capsulatum and its teleomorph Ajellomyces capsulatus are the offending species.

Histoplasmoses
Infecton resulting from inhalation or ingestion of spores of the fungus of the genus HISTOPLASMA, species H. capsulatum. It is worldwide in distribution and particularly common in the midwestern United States. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Histoplasmosis
A fungal disease caused by inhaling the spores of Histoplasma capsulatum.

Historical Article
An article or portion of an article giving an account of past events or circumstances significant in a field of study, a profession, a discovery, an invention, etc. The concept of history is very wide, ranging from the dawn of time to the present. This publication type is often checked in conjunction with BIOGRAPHY [PUBLICATION TYPE].

Historical Article (PT)
An article or portion of an article giving an account of past events or circumstances significant in a field of study, a profession, a discovery, an invention, etc. The concept of history is very wide, ranging from the dawn of time to the present. This publication type is often checked in conjunction with BIOGRAPHY [PUBLICATION TYPE].

Historical Article [Publication Type]
An article or portion of an article giving an account of past events or circumstances significant in a field of study, a profession, a discovery, an invention, etc. The concept of history is very wide, ranging from the dawn of time to the present. This publication type is often checked in conjunction with BIOGRAPHY [PUBLICATION TYPE].

Historical Cohort Studies
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.

Historical Cohort Study
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.

Historical Demographies
Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.

Historical Demography
Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.

Historical Eclecticism
A system of medicine, most popular in the 19th century, that advocates the use of indigenous plants in the treatment of specific signs and symptoms.

Historical Geographic Locations
Countries known in remote history (as BYZANTIUM) or former names of countries reflecting political changes in the 20th century (as GERMANY, EAST).

Historical Survey
An article or portion of an article giving an account of past events or circumstances significant in a field of study, a profession, a discovery, an invention, etc. The concept of history is very wide, ranging from the dawn of time to the present. This publication type is often checked in conjunction with BIOGRAPHY [PUBLICATION TYPE].

Historical Survey (PT)
An article or portion of an article giving an account of past events or circumstances significant in a field of study, a profession, a discovery, an invention, etc. The concept of history is very wide, ranging from the dawn of time to the present. This publication type is often checked in conjunction with BIOGRAPHY [PUBLICATION TYPE].

Histories, 21st Cent.
Events and developments in medicine during the 100 year period following the 20th century.

Histories, 21st Cent. (Medicine)
Events and developments in medicine during the 100 year period following the 20th century.

Histories, Abortion
Intentional removal of a fetus from the uterus by any of a number of techniques. (POPLINE, 1978)

Histories, Ancient (Medicine)
The period of the history of medicine before 500 A.D.

Histories, Early Modern (Medicine)
The period of the history of medicine from 1451 through 1600 A.D. HISTORY OF MEDICINE, 15TH CENT. and HISTORY OF MEDICINE, 16TH CENT. are also available.

Histories, Medieval (Medicine)
The period of the history of medicine from 500 through 1450 A.D.

Histories, Modern (Medicine)
The period of the history of medicine from 1601 A.D. to the present.

Historiographies
The writing of history; the principles, theory, and history of historical writing; the product of historical writing. (Webster, 3d ed)

Historiography
The writing of history; the principles, theory, and history of historical writing; the product of historical writing. (Webster, 3d ed)

History Medicine, Ancient
The period of the history of medicine before 500 A.D.

History Medicine, Medieval
The period of the history of medicine from 500 through 1450 A.D.

History Medicines, Ancient
The period of the history of medicine before 500 A.D.

History of Medicine, 21st Cent.
Events and developments in medicine during the 100 year period following the 20th century.

History of Medicine, Ancient
The period of the history of medicine before 500 A.D.

History of Medicine, Early Modern
The period of the history of medicine from 1451 through 1600 A.D. HISTORY OF MEDICINE, 15TH CENT. and HISTORY OF MEDICINE, 16TH CENT. are also available.

History of Medicine, Medieval
The period of the history of medicine from 500 through 1450 A.D.

History of Medicine, Modern
The period of the history of medicine from 1601 A.D. to the present.

History of Medicine, Renaissance
The period of the history of medicine from 500 through 1450 A.D.

History, 21st Cent.
Events and developments in medicine during the 100 year period following the 20th century.

History, 21st Cent. (Medicine)
Events and developments in medicine during the 100 year period following the 20th century.

History, Abortion
Intentional removal of a fetus from the uterus by any of a number of techniques. (POPLINE, 1978)

History, Ancient
The period of the history of medicine before 500 A.D.

History, Ancient (Medicine)
The period of the history of medicine before 500 A.D.

History, Early Modern
The period of the history of medicine from 1451 through 1600 A.D. HISTORY OF MEDICINE, 15TH CENT. and HISTORY OF MEDICINE, 16TH CENT. are also available.

History, Early Modern (Medicine)
The period of the history of medicine from 1451 through 1600 A.D. HISTORY OF MEDICINE, 15TH CENT. and HISTORY OF MEDICINE, 16TH CENT. are also available.

History, Medieval
The period of the history of medicine from 500 through 1450 A.D.

History, Medieval (Medicine)
The period of the history of medicine from 500 through 1450 A.D.

History, Modern
The period of the history of medicine from 1601 A.D. to the present.

History, Modern (Medicine)
The period of the history of medicine from 1601 A.D. to the present.

History, Natural
A former branch of knowledge embracing the study, description, and classification of natural objects (as animals, plants, and minerals) and thus including the modern sciences of zoology, botany, and mineralogy insofar as they existed at that time. In the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries it was much used for the generalized pursuit of certain areas of science. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)

Histrionic Personality Disorder
A personality disorder characterized by overly reactive and intensely expressed or overly dramatic behavior, proneness to exaggeration, emotional excitability, and disturbances in interpersonal relationships.

Histrionic Personality Disorders
A personality disorder characterized by overly reactive and intensely expressed or overly dramatic behavior, proneness to exaggeration, emotional excitability, and disturbances in interpersonal relationships.



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Heavy chain
The larger of the two types of chains that comprise a normal immunoglobulin or antibody molecule.

H chain
The larger of the two types of chains that comprise a normal immunoglobulin or antibody molecule.

Helper T cells
A class of T cells which help trigger B cells to make antibody against thymus-dependent antigens. Helper T cells also help generate cytotoxic T cells.

Heterophile antigen
A cross-reacting antigen that appears in widely ranging species such as humans and bacteria.

Hinge region
A flexible, open segment of an antibody molecule that allows bending of the molecule. The hinge region is located between Fab and Fc and is susceptible to enzymatic cleavage.

Histocompatibility

Humoral immunity
Any immune reaction that can be transferred with immune serum is termed humoral immunity (as opposed to cell-mediated immunity). In general, this term refers to resistance that results from the presence of specific antibody.

Hybridoma
A hybrid cell that results from the fusion of an antibody-secreting cell with a malignant cell; the progeny secrete antibody without stimulation and proliferate continuously both in vivo and in vitro.

Hypersensitivity
State of reactivity to antigen that is greater than normal for the antigenic challenge; hypersensitivity is the same as allergy and denotes a deleterious outcome rather than a protective one.

Hypervariable regions
Portions of the light and heavy immunoglobulin chains that are highly variable in amino acid sequence from one immunoglobulin molecule to another, and that, together, constitute the antigen-binding site of an antibody molecule. Also, portions of the T-cell receptor which constitute the antigen-binding site.

Hallucinosis
A morbid condition, as in acute alcoholic hallucinosis, which is characterized by recurrent acute attacks marked by hallucinated auditory threats of persecution.

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