Hemangioma
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  Hemangioma



Hemangioma

   An extremely common benign tumor, occurring most commonly in infancy and childhood, made up of newly formed blood vessels, and resulting from malformation of angioblastic tissue of fetal life. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. About 75% are present at birth, and about 60% occur in the head and neck area. The majority in infancy will regress spontaneously. Some hemangiomas grow rapidly during the early months of life and may be a source of some concern, although virtually all disappear by about 5 years of age. They do not metastasize and simple excision will often be curative. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1355)

RELATED TERMS
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Benign
Non-malignant; not life-threatening.

Tumor
Overgrowth of tissue.

Infancy
Babyhood; the period of development between birth and the beginning of early childhood between the ages of two and three years.

Childhood
1. The time for a boy or girl from birth until he or she is an adult. 2. The more circumscribed period of time from infancy to the onset of puberty.

Blood
The life-maintaining fluid which is made up of plasma, red blood cells (erythrocytes), white blood cells (leukocytes), and platelets; blood circulates through the body's heart, arteries, veins, and capillaries; it carries away waste matter and carbon dioxide, and brings nourishment, electrolytes, hormones, vitamins, antibodies, heat, and oxygen to the tissues.

Malformation
Abnormal or anomalous formation or structure; deformity.

Tissue
Biological tissue is a group of cells that perform a similar function.The study of tissues is known as histology, or, in connection with disease, histopathology.The classical tools for studying the tissues are the wax block, the tissue stain, and the optical microscope, though developments in electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and frozen sections have all added to the sum of knowledge in the last couple of decades.

Fetal
Having to do with the fetus.

Skin
Skin is an organ of the integumentary system; which is composed of a layer of tissues that protect underlying muscles and organs. Skin is used for insulation, vitamin D production, sensation, and excretion (through sweat).

Subcutaneous
Below the skin.

Hemangiomas
An extremely common benign tumor, occurring most commonly in infancy and childhood, made up of newly formed blood vessels, and resulting from malformation of angioblastic tissue of fetal life. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. About 75% are present at birth, and about 60% occur in the head and neck area. The majority in infancy will regress spontaneously. Some hemangiomas grow rapidly during the early months of life and may be a source of some concern, although virtually all disappear by about 5 years of age. They do not metastasize and simple excision will often be curative. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1355)

Metastasize
To spread to another part of the body, usually through the blood vessels, lymph channels, or spinal fluid.

Excision
1. Surgical removal, as in the excision of a tumor. 2. The removal as if by surgery, as in base excision repair.

Cancer
Any malignant growth or tumor caused by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division; it may spread to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system or the blood stream.

Oncology
The study and treatment of cancers.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Hemabate
Hemabate is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): carboprost tromethamine.

Hemachatus
A genus of poisonous snakes of the subfamily Elapinae of the family ELAPIDAE. There are six recognized species, all inhabiting Africa except the Asiatic (Indian) cobra, Naja naja. Some species ""spit"" their venom into the eyes of their ""enemies"". So-called spitting cobras show a high degree of accuracy in aiming for the eyes. The ringhals, the most highly specialized of the spitting cobras, is limited to southern Africa. Its spray destroys eye tissue and can cause blindness; its bite can cause death. (Moore: Poisonous Snakes of the World, 1980, p80)

Hemadsorption
A phenomenon manifested by an agent or substance adhering to or being adsorbed on the surface of a red blood cell, as tuberculin can be adsorbed on red blood cells under certain conditions. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Hemadsorption Virus 1
A species of RESPIROVIRUS frequently isolated from small children with pharyngitis, bronchitis, and pneumonia.

Hemadsorption Virus 2
A species of RESPIROVIRUS also called hemadsorption virus 2 (HA2), which causes laryngotracheitis in humans, especially children.

Hemadsorptions
A phenomenon manifested by an agent or substance adhering to or being adsorbed on the surface of a red blood cell, as tuberculin can be adsorbed on red blood cells under certain conditions. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Hemagglutinating Virus of Japan
The type species of RESPIROVIRUS in the subfamily PARAMYXOVIRINAE. It is the murine version of HUMAN PARAINFLUENZA VIRUS 1, distinguished by host range.

Hemagglutination
The agglutination of red blood cells; may be immune as a result of specific antibody either for red blood cell antigens per se or other antigens which coat the red blood cells, or may be nonimmune as in hemagglutination caused by viruses or other microbes.

Hemagglutination Inhibition Test
Serologic tests in which a known quantity of antigen is added to the serum prior to the addition of a red cell suspension. Reaction result is expressed as the smallest amount of antigen which causes complete inhibition of hemagglutination.

Hemagglutination Inhibition Tests
Serologic tests in which a known quantity of antigen is added to the serum prior to the addition of a red cell suspension. Reaction result is expressed as the smallest amount of antigen which causes complete inhibition of hemagglutination.

Hemagglutination Test
Sensitive tests to measure certain antigens, antibodies, or viruses, using their ability to agglutinate certain erythrocytes. (From Stedman, 26th ed)

Hemagglutination Tests
Sensitive tests to measure certain antigens, antibodies, or viruses, using their ability to agglutinate certain erythrocytes. (From Stedman, 26th ed)

Hemagglutination, Viral
Agglutination of erythrocytes by a virus.

Hemagglutinations, Viral
Agglutination of erythrocytes by a virus.

Hemagglutinin
A substance, antibody or other, that causes hemagglutination.

Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus
Membrane glycoproteins from influenza viruses which are involved in hemagglutination, virus attachment, and envelope fusion. Fourteen distinct subtypes of HA glycoproteins and nine of NA glycoproteins have been identified from INFLUENZA A VIRUS; no subtypes have been identified for Influenza B or Influenza C viruses.

Hemagglutinin Neuraminidase Glycoprotein
Glycoprotein from Sendai, para-influenza, Newcastle Disease, and other viruses that participates in binding the virus to cell-surface receptors. The HN protein possesses both hemagglutinin and neuraminidase activity.

Hemagglutinin, Leukocytosis-Promoting Factor
Any of various biologically active proteins or toxins elaborated by Bordetella pertussis that cause the symptoms of whooping cough. Some activate pancreatic islets, others inhibit the adenylate cyclase cascade and some cause lymphocytosis.

Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Glycoprotein
Glycoprotein from Sendai, para-influenza, Newcastle Disease, and other viruses that participates in binding the virus to cell-surface receptors. The HN protein possesses both hemagglutinin and neuraminidase activity.

Hemagglutinins
Agents that cause agglutination of red blood cells. They include antibodies, blood group antigens, lectins, autoimmune factors, bacterial, viral, or parasitic blood agglutinins, etc.

Hemagglutinins, Plant
Protein or glycoprotein substances, usually of plant origin, that bind to sugar moieties in cell walls or membranes and thereby change the physiology of the membrane to cause agglutination, mitosis, or other biochemical changes in the cell.

Hemalysins
Substances, usually of biological origin, that destroy blood cells; they may be antibodies or other immunologic factors, toxins, enzymes, etc.; hemotoxins are toxic to blood in general, including the clotting mechanism; hematotoxins may refer to the hematopoietic system.

Hemangio
Blood vessel.

Hemangioblastic Meningioma
A relatively common neoplasm of the central nervous system that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and spinal canal. They tend to present in the fourth to sixth decades of life with signs indicative of a slowly progressive mass lesion. Specific clinical manifestations depend on the location of the tumor, but may include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, cranial neuropathies, ataxia, and other focal neurologic signs. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)

Hemangioblastic Meningiomas
A relatively common neoplasm of the central nervous system that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and spinal canal. They tend to present in the fourth to sixth decades of life with signs indicative of a slowly progressive mass lesion. Specific clinical manifestations depend on the location of the tumor, but may include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, cranial neuropathies, ataxia, and other focal neurologic signs. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)

Hemangioblastoma
A benign tumor of the nervous system that may occur sporadically or in association with HIPPEL-LINDAU DISEASE. It accounts for approximately 2% of intracranial tumors, arising most frequently in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. Histologically, the tumors are composed of multiple capillary and sinusoidal channels lined with endothelial cells and clusters of lipid-laden pseudoxanthoma cells. Usually solitary, these tumors can be multiple and may also occur in the brain stem, spinal cord, retina, and supratentorial compartment. Cerebellar hemangioblastomas usually present in the third decade with INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, and ataxia. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2071-2)

Hemangioblastoma, Multiple
A benign tumor of the nervous system that may occur sporadically or in association with HIPPEL-LINDAU DISEASE. It accounts for approximately 2% of intracranial tumors, arising most frequently in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. Histologically, the tumors are composed of multiple capillary and sinusoidal channels lined with endothelial cells and clusters of lipid-laden pseudoxanthoma cells. Usually solitary, these tumors can be multiple and may also occur in the brain stem, spinal cord, retina, and supratentorial compartment. Cerebellar hemangioblastomas usually present in the third decade with INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, and ataxia. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2071-2)

Hemangioblastomas
A benign tumor of the nervous system that may occur sporadically or in association with HIPPEL-LINDAU DISEASE. It accounts for approximately 2% of intracranial tumors, arising most frequently in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. Histologically, the tumors are composed of multiple capillary and sinusoidal channels lined with endothelial cells and clusters of lipid-laden pseudoxanthoma cells. Usually solitary, these tumors can be multiple and may also occur in the brain stem, spinal cord, retina, and supratentorial compartment. Cerebellar hemangioblastomas usually present in the third decade with INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, and ataxia. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2071-2)

Hemangioblastomas, Multiple
A benign tumor of the nervous system that may occur sporadically or in association with HIPPEL-LINDAU DISEASE. It accounts for approximately 2% of intracranial tumors, arising most frequently in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. Histologically, the tumors are composed of multiple capillary and sinusoidal channels lined with endothelial cells and clusters of lipid-laden pseudoxanthoma cells. Usually solitary, these tumors can be multiple and may also occur in the brain stem, spinal cord, retina, and supratentorial compartment. Cerebellar hemangioblastomas usually present in the third decade with INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, and ataxia. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2071-2)

Hemangioendothelioma
A neoplasm derived from blood vessels, characterized by numerous prominent endothelial cells that occur singly, in aggregates, and as the lining of congeries of vascular tubes or channels. Hemangioendotheliomas are relatively rare and are of intermediate malignancy (between benign hemangiomas and conventional angiosarcomas). They affect men and women about equally and rarely develop in childhood. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)

Hemangioendotheliomas
A neoplasm derived from blood vessels, characterized by numerous prominent endothelial cells that occur singly, in aggregates, and as the lining of congeries of vascular tubes or channels. Hemangioendotheliomas are relatively rare and are of intermediate malignancy (between benign hemangiomas and conventional angiosarcomas). They affect men and women about equally and rarely develop in childhood. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)

Hemangioma, Capillary
A dull red, firm, dome-shaped hemangioma, sharply demarcated from surrounding skin, usually located on the head and neck, which grows rapidly and generally undergoes regression and involution without scarring. It is caused by proliferation of immature capillary vessels in active stroma, and is usually present at birth or occurs within the first two or three months of life. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Hemangioma, Cavernous
A vascular tumor preponderantly composed of large dilated blood vessels, often containing large amounts of blood, occurring in the skin, subcutaneously, or both, and also in many viscera, particularly the liver, spleen, pancreas, and sometimes the brain. The typical superficial lesions are bright to dark red in color; deep lesions have a blue color. A cavernous hemangioma in the skin extends more deeply than a capillary hemangioma and is less likely to regress spontaneously. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Stedman, 25th ed)

Hemangioma, Cavernous, Central Nervous System
A vascular malformation composed of clusters of large, thin walled veins lacking intervening nervous tissue. They are most common in the BRAIN STEM but may also occur in the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions have a tendency to rupture and cause a variety of clinical deficits (e.g., SEIZURES; hemiparesis) that depend upon the location of the hemorrhage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp851-2)

Hemangioma, Cerebral Cavernous
A vascular malformation composed of clusters of large, thin walled veins lacking intervening nervous tissue. They are most common in the BRAIN STEM but may also occur in the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions have a tendency to rupture and cause a variety of clinical deficits (e.g., SEIZURES; hemiparesis) that depend upon the location of the hemorrhage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp851-2)

Hemangioma, Extracerebral Cavernous
A vascular malformation composed of clusters of large, thin walled veins lacking intervening nervous tissue. They are most common in the BRAIN STEM but may also occur in the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions have a tendency to rupture and cause a variety of clinical deficits (e.g., SEIZURES; hemiparesis) that depend upon the location of the hemorrhage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp851-2)

Hemangioma, Histiocytoid
An extremely common benign tumor, occurring most commonly in infancy and childhood, made up of newly formed blood vessels, and resulting from malformation of angioblastic tissue of fetal life. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. About 75% are present at birth, and about 60% occur in the head and neck area. The majority in infancy will regress spontaneously. Some hemangiomas grow rapidly during the early months of life and may be a source of some concern, although virtually all disappear by about 5 years of age. They do not metastasize and simple excision will often be curative. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1355)

Hemangioma, Intracerebral Cavernous
A vascular malformation composed of clusters of large, thin walled veins lacking intervening nervous tissue. They are most common in the BRAIN STEM but may also occur in the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions have a tendency to rupture and cause a variety of clinical deficits (e.g., SEIZURES; hemiparesis) that depend upon the location of the hemorrhage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp851-2)

Hemangioma, Intramuscular
An extremely common benign tumor, occurring most commonly in infancy and childhood, made up of newly formed blood vessels, and resulting from malformation of angioblastic tissue of fetal life. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. About 75% are present at birth, and about 60% occur in the head and neck area. The majority in infancy will regress spontaneously. Some hemangiomas grow rapidly during the early months of life and may be a source of some concern, although virtually all disappear by about 5 years of age. They do not metastasize and simple excision will often be curative. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1355)

Hemangioma, Lobular Capillary
A disorder of the skin, the oral mucosa, and the gingiva, that usually presents as a solitary polypoid capillary hemangioma often resulting from trauma. It is manifested as an inflammatory response with similar characteristics to those of a granuloma.

Hemangiomas
An extremely common benign tumor, occurring most commonly in infancy and childhood, made up of newly formed blood vessels, and resulting from malformation of angioblastic tissue of fetal life. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. About 75% are present at birth, and about 60% occur in the head and neck area. The majority in infancy will regress spontaneously. Some hemangiomas grow rapidly during the early months of life and may be a source of some concern, although virtually all disappear by about 5 years of age. They do not metastasize and simple excision will often be curative. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1355)

Hemangiomas, Capillary
A dull red, firm, dome-shaped hemangioma, sharply demarcated from surrounding skin, usually located on the head and neck, which grows rapidly and generally undergoes regression and involution without scarring. It is caused by proliferation of immature capillary vessels in active stroma, and is usually present at birth or occurs within the first two or three months of life. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Hemangiomas, Cavernous
A vascular tumor preponderantly composed of large dilated blood vessels, often containing large amounts of blood, occurring in the skin, subcutaneously, or both, and also in many viscera, particularly the liver, spleen, pancreas, and sometimes the brain. The typical superficial lesions are bright to dark red in color; deep lesions have a blue color. A cavernous hemangioma in the skin extends more deeply than a capillary hemangioma and is less likely to regress spontaneously. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Stedman, 25th ed)

Hemangiomas, Cerebral Cavernous
A vascular malformation composed of clusters of large, thin walled veins lacking intervening nervous tissue. They are most common in the BRAIN STEM but may also occur in the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions have a tendency to rupture and cause a variety of clinical deficits (e.g., SEIZURES; hemiparesis) that depend upon the location of the hemorrhage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp851-2)

Hemangiomas, Extracerebral Cavernous
A vascular malformation composed of clusters of large, thin walled veins lacking intervening nervous tissue. They are most common in the BRAIN STEM but may also occur in the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions have a tendency to rupture and cause a variety of clinical deficits (e.g., SEIZURES; hemiparesis) that depend upon the location of the hemorrhage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp851-2)

Hemangiomas, Histiocytoid
An extremely common benign tumor, occurring most commonly in infancy and childhood, made up of newly formed blood vessels, and resulting from malformation of angioblastic tissue of fetal life. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. About 75% are present at birth, and about 60% occur in the head and neck area. The majority in infancy will regress spontaneously. Some hemangiomas grow rapidly during the early months of life and may be a source of some concern, although virtually all disappear by about 5 years of age. They do not metastasize and simple excision will often be curative. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1355)

Hemangiomas, Intracerebral Cavernous
A vascular malformation composed of clusters of large, thin walled veins lacking intervening nervous tissue. They are most common in the BRAIN STEM but may also occur in the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions have a tendency to rupture and cause a variety of clinical deficits (e.g., SEIZURES; hemiparesis) that depend upon the location of the hemorrhage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp851-2)

Hemangiomas, Intramuscular
An extremely common benign tumor, occurring most commonly in infancy and childhood, made up of newly formed blood vessels, and resulting from malformation of angioblastic tissue of fetal life. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. About 75% are present at birth, and about 60% occur in the head and neck area. The majority in infancy will regress spontaneously. Some hemangiomas grow rapidly during the early months of life and may be a source of some concern, although virtually all disappear by about 5 years of age. They do not metastasize and simple excision will often be curative. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1355)

Hemangiomatosis Syndrome, Encephalofacial
A congenital syndrome characterized by a port-wine nevus covering portions of the face and cranium (in the distribution of the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE) and angiomas of the meninges and choroid. Clinical manifestations include the onset of focal SEIZURES, progressive hemiparesis, GLAUCOMA, hemianopsia, and cognitive deficits in the first decade of life. By age two years, skull radiographs reveal ""tramline calcifications"" of the margins of the occipital and parietal lobes. Pathologically cortical neurons are replaced by glial tissue that undergoes calcification. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1018-9)

Hemangiomatosis Syndromes, Encephalofacial
A congenital syndrome characterized by a port-wine nevus covering portions of the face and cranium (in the distribution of the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE) and angiomas of the meninges and choroid. Clinical manifestations include the onset of focal SEIZURES, progressive hemiparesis, GLAUCOMA, hemianopsia, and cognitive deficits in the first decade of life. By age two years, skull radiographs reveal ""tramline calcifications"" of the margins of the occipital and parietal lobes. Pathologically cortical neurons are replaced by glial tissue that undergoes calcification. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1018-9)

Hemangiopericytic Meningioma
A relatively common neoplasm of the central nervous system that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and spinal canal. They tend to present in the fourth to sixth decades of life with signs indicative of a slowly progressive mass lesion. Specific clinical manifestations depend on the location of the tumor, but may include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, cranial neuropathies, ataxia, and other focal neurologic signs. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)

Hemangiopericytic Meningiomas
A relatively common neoplasm of the central nervous system that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and spinal canal. They tend to present in the fourth to sixth decades of life with signs indicative of a slowly progressive mass lesion. Specific clinical manifestations depend on the location of the tumor, but may include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, cranial neuropathies, ataxia, and other focal neurologic signs. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)

Hemangiopericytoma
A tumor composed of spindle cells with a rich vascular network, which apparently arises from pericytes, cells of smooth muscle origin that lie around small vessels. Benign and malignant hemangiopericytomas exist, and the rarity of these lesions has led to considerable confusion in distinguishing between benign and malignant variants. (From Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1364)

Hemangiopericytomas
A tumor composed of spindle cells with a rich vascular network, which apparently arises from pericytes, cells of smooth muscle origin that lie around small vessels. Benign and malignant hemangiopericytomas exist, and the rarity of these lesions has led to considerable confusion in distinguishing between benign and malignant variants. (From Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1364)

Hemangiosarcoma
Malignant tumor of a blood vessel.

Hemangiosarcomas
A rare malignant neoplasm characterized by rapidly proliferating, extensively infiltrating, anaplastic cells derived from blood vessels and lining irregular blood-filled or lumpy spaces. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Hemarthroses
Bleeding into the joints. It may arise from trauma or spontaneously in patients with hemophilia.

Hemarthrosis
Bleeding into the joints. It may arise from trauma or spontaneously in patients with hemophilia.

Hematemeses
Vomiting of blood.

Hematemesis
Vomiting blood.

Hematin
Chloro(7,12-diethenyl-3,8,13,17-tetramethyl-21H,23H-porphine-2,18-dipropanoato(4-)-N(21),N(22),N(23),N(24)) ferrate(2-) dihydrogen.

Hematin D-575, Alkaline
Chloro(7,12-diethenyl-3,8,13,17-tetramethyl-21H,23H-porphine-2,18-dipropanoato(4-)-N(21),N(22),N(23),N(24)) ferrate(2-) dihydrogen.

Hematinics
Agents which improve the quality of the blood, increasing the hemoglobin level and the number of erythrocytes. They are used in the treatment of anemias.

Hemato Encephalic Barrier
Specialized non-fenestrated tightly-joined endothelial cells (tight junctions) that form a transport barrier for certain substances between the cerebral capillaries and the brain tissue.

Hemato-Encephalic Barrier
Specialized non-fenestrated tightly-joined endothelial cells (tight junctions) that form a transport barrier for certain substances between the cerebral capillaries and the brain tissue.

Hemato-Encephalic Barriers
Specialized non-fenestrated tightly-joined endothelial cells (tight junctions) that form a transport barrier for certain substances between the cerebral capillaries and the brain tissue.

Hematocele
Hemorrhage into a canal or cavity of the body, especially into the tunica vaginalis testis.

Hematoceles
Hemorrhage into a canal or cavity of the body, especially into the tunica vaginalis testis.

Hematochezia
Bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract.

Hematochezias
Bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract.

Hematocolpos
An accumulation of menstrual blood in the vagina. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Hematocrit
The volume percentage of erythrocytes in whole blood.

Hematocrits
Measurement of the volume of packed red cells in a blood specimen by centrifugation. The procedure is performed using a tube with graduated markings or with automated blood cell counters. It is used as an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, anemia shows a low hematocrit, polycythemia, high values.

Hematoidin
A bile pigment that is a degradation product of HEME.

Hematologic Agents
Drugs that act on blood and blood-forming organs and those that affect the hemostatic system.

Hematologic Capillary Resistance
The lack of resistance, or susceptibility, of capillaries to damage or disruption under conditions of increased stress.

Hematologic Dis
Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.

Hematologic Disease
Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.

Hematologic Diseases
Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.

Hematologic Malignancies
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.

Hematologic Malignancy
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.

Hematologic Neoplasm
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.

Hematologic Neoplasms
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.

Hematologic Pregnancy Complication
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a blood disease. The hematologic disorder may be of the cells or coagulation elements of the blood but does not refer to deficiencies or excesses of various substances in the blood, such as hypercalcemia or hypocalcemia. It may precede or follow conception and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or fetus.

Hematologic Pregnancy Complications
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a blood disease. The hematologic disorder may be of the cells or coagulation elements of the blood but does not refer to deficiencies or excesses of various substances in the blood, such as hypercalcemia or hypocalcemia. It may precede or follow conception and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or fetus.

Hematologic Test
Tests used in the analysis of the hemic system.

Hematologic Tests
Tests used in the analysis of the hemic system.

Hematologic, Gastrointestinal, and Renal Agents
A collective grouping for agents that act on the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal, and renal systems.

Hematological Agents
Drugs that act on blood and blood-forming organs and those that affect the hemostatic system.

Hematological Capillary Resistance
The lack of resistance, or susceptibility, of capillaries to damage or disruption under conditions of increased stress.

Hematological Disease
Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.

Hematological Diseases
Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.

Hematological Malignancies
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.

Hematological Malignancy
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.

Hematological Neoplasm
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.

Hematological Neoplasms
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.

Hematological Pregnancy Complication
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a blood disease. The hematologic disorder may be of the cells or coagulation elements of the blood but does not refer to deficiencies or excesses of various substances in the blood, such as hypercalcemia or hypocalcemia. It may precede or follow conception and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or fetus.

Hematological Pregnancy Complications
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a blood disease. The hematologic disorder may be of the cells or coagulation elements of the blood but does not refer to deficiencies or excesses of various substances in the blood, such as hypercalcemia or hypocalcemia. It may precede or follow conception and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or fetus.

Hematological Test
Tests used in the analysis of the hemic system.

Hematological Tests
Tests used in the analysis of the hemic system.

Hematological, Gastric, Renal Agents
A collective grouping for agents that act on the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal, and renal systems.

Hematology
The study and treatment of blood and blood-forming tissues.

Hematoma
Swelling of effused blood beneath tissue surface.

Hematoma, Acute Subdural
Hemorrhage and accumulation of blood in the subdural space associated with the acute onset of neurologic deficits, usually following CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. Hematoma formation occurs most frequently over the lateral and superior aspects of a cerebral hemisphere, but may also occur in the posterior fossa and spinal canal. Clinical manifestations may include hemiparesis, SEIZURES, third nerve palsy (see OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES), mental status changes, and COMA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p886)

Hematoma, Basal Ganglia
Extravasation of blood into a basal ganglia nucleus (e.g., caudate, globus pallidus, amygdala, putamen, and claustrum). Clinical manifestations may include acute hemiparesis, movement disorders, headache and/or alterations of consciousness. Hypertension and vascular malformations are relatively common causes of this condition. Pathologically, these hemorrhages are associated with lipohyalinosis of small blood vessels and Charcot-Bouchard microaneurysm formation. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p836)

Hematoma, Chronic Subdural
Chronic accumulation of blood in the subdural space, most frequently occurring over the lateral and superior aspects of a cerebral hemisphere. Clinical manifestations may be delayed for days to weeks, when affected individuals may present with confusion, drowsiness, hemiparesis, ATAXIA, APHASIA, and other signs of neurologic dysfunction. The condition tends to occur after the age of 50 years. It may be spontaneous, follow CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, or occur in association with bleeding disorders, the use of anticoagulant medication, locally invasive tumors, and other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p887)

Hematoma, Epidural
Accumulation of blood in the cranial epidural space due to rupture of the middle meningeal artery or rarely the meningeal vein, often associated with a temporal or parietal bone fracture. The hematoma tends to expand rapidly, compressing the dura and underlying brain. Clinical features include the acute or subacute onset of headache, VOMITING, alterations of mentation, and hemiparesis (see HEMIPLEGIA). The natural history of the process is progression to coma and eventually death. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p885)

Hematoma, Extradural
Accumulation of blood in the cranial epidural space due to rupture of the middle meningeal artery or rarely the meningeal vein, often associated with a temporal or parietal bone fracture. The hematoma tends to expand rapidly, compressing the dura and underlying brain. Clinical features include the acute or subacute onset of headache, VOMITING, alterations of mentation, and hemiparesis (see HEMIPLEGIA). The natural history of the process is progression to coma and eventually death. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p885)

Hematoma, Intracranial Subdural
Extravasation and subsequent accumulation of blood in the subdural space between the dural and arachnoidal layers of the meninges. This condition primarily occurs over the surface of a cerebral hemisphere, but may develop in the posterior fossa and spinal canal. Acute (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, ACUTE) and chronic (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, CHRONIC) forms exist.

Hematoma, Putaminal
Bleeding into the PUTAMEN, a BASAL GANGLIA nucleus. This is a relatively common site of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and is associated with chronic HYPERTENSION and lipohyalinosis of small blood vessels in the putamen. Clinical manifestations vary with the size of hemorrhage, but include hemiparesis, headache, and alterations of consciousness.

Hematoma, Spinal Subdural
Extravasation and subsequent accumulation of blood in the subdural space between the dural and arachnoidal layers of the meninges. This condition primarily occurs over the surface of a cerebral hemisphere, but may develop in the posterior fossa and spinal canal. Acute (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, ACUTE) and chronic (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, CHRONIC) forms exist.

Hematoma, Subdural
Extravasation and subsequent accumulation of blood in the subdural space between the dural and arachnoidal layers of the meninges. This condition primarily occurs over the surface of a cerebral hemisphere, but may develop in the posterior fossa and spinal canal. Acute (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, ACUTE) and chronic (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, CHRONIC) forms exist.

Hematoma, Subdural, Acute
Hemorrhage and accumulation of blood in the subdural space associated with the acute onset of neurologic deficits, usually following CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. Hematoma formation occurs most frequently over the lateral and superior aspects of a cerebral hemisphere, but may also occur in the posterior fossa and spinal canal. Clinical manifestations may include hemiparesis, SEIZURES, third nerve palsy (see OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES), mental status changes, and COMA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p886)

Hematoma, Subdural, Chronic
Chronic accumulation of blood in the subdural space, most frequently occurring over the lateral and superior aspects of a cerebral hemisphere. Clinical manifestations may be delayed for days to weeks, when affected individuals may present with confusion, drowsiness, hemiparesis, ATAXIA, APHASIA, and other signs of neurologic dysfunction. The condition tends to occur after the age of 50 years. It may be spontaneous, follow CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, or occur in association with bleeding disorders, the use of anticoagulant medication, locally invasive tumors, and other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p887)

Hematoma, Traumatic Brainstem
Extravasation of blood into the midbrain, pons, or medulla following CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY is commonly associated. Clinical manifestations which may be associated with this condition include OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; ATAXIA; PARALYSIS; PERSISTENT VEGETATIVE STATE; and COMA.

Hematoma, Traumatic Cerebral
Bleeding into the CEREBRAL CORTEX; CORPUS CALLOSUM; BASAL GANGLIA, or subcortical white matter following CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY, cerebral edema, and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION are frequently associated conditions. Relatively frequent clinical manifestations include SEIZURES; APHASIA; VISION DISORDERS; MOVEMENT DISORDERS; PARALYSIS, and COMA.

Hematoma, Traumatic Intracranial
Bleeding within the cranial vault induced by penetrating and nonpenetrating traumatic injuries, including hemorrhages into the epidural, subdural and subarachnoid spaces, cerebral hemispheres, DIENCEPHALON; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM.

Hematoma, Traumatic Subdural
Extravasation and subsequent accumulation of blood in the subdural space between the dural and arachnoidal layers of the meninges. This condition primarily occurs over the surface of a cerebral hemisphere, but may develop in the posterior fossa and spinal canal. Acute (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, ACUTE) and chronic (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, CHRONIC) forms exist.

Hematomas
An extravasation of blood localized in an organ, space, or tissue.

Hematomas, Acute Subdural
Hemorrhage and accumulation of blood in the subdural space associated with the acute onset of neurologic deficits, usually following CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. Hematoma formation occurs most frequently over the lateral and superior aspects of a cerebral hemisphere, but may also occur in the posterior fossa and spinal canal. Clinical manifestations may include hemiparesis, SEIZURES, third nerve palsy (see OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES), mental status changes, and COMA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p886)

Hematomas, Basal Ganglia
Extravasation of blood into a basal ganglia nucleus (e.g., caudate, globus pallidus, amygdala, putamen, and claustrum). Clinical manifestations may include acute hemiparesis, movement disorders, headache and/or alterations of consciousness. Hypertension and vascular malformations are relatively common causes of this condition. Pathologically, these hemorrhages are associated with lipohyalinosis of small blood vessels and Charcot-Bouchard microaneurysm formation. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p836)

Hematomas, Chronic Subdural
Chronic accumulation of blood in the subdural space, most frequently occurring over the lateral and superior aspects of a cerebral hemisphere. Clinical manifestations may be delayed for days to weeks, when affected individuals may present with confusion, drowsiness, hemiparesis, ATAXIA, APHASIA, and other signs of neurologic dysfunction. The condition tends to occur after the age of 50 years. It may be spontaneous, follow CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, or occur in association with bleeding disorders, the use of anticoagulant medication, locally invasive tumors, and other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p887)

Hematomas, Epidural
Accumulation of blood in the cranial epidural space due to rupture of the middle meningeal artery or rarely the meningeal vein, often associated with a temporal or parietal bone fracture. The hematoma tends to expand rapidly, compressing the dura and underlying brain. Clinical features include the acute or subacute onset of headache, VOMITING, alterations of mentation, and hemiparesis (see HEMIPLEGIA). The natural history of the process is progression to coma and eventually death. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p885)

Hematomas, Extradural
Accumulation of blood in the cranial epidural space due to rupture of the middle meningeal artery or rarely the meningeal vein, often associated with a temporal or parietal bone fracture. The hematoma tends to expand rapidly, compressing the dura and underlying brain. Clinical features include the acute or subacute onset of headache, VOMITING, alterations of mentation, and hemiparesis (see HEMIPLEGIA). The natural history of the process is progression to coma and eventually death. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p885)

Hematomas, Intracranial Subdural
Extravasation and subsequent accumulation of blood in the subdural space between the dural and arachnoidal layers of the meninges. This condition primarily occurs over the surface of a cerebral hemisphere, but may develop in the posterior fossa and spinal canal. Acute (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, ACUTE) and chronic (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, CHRONIC) forms exist.

Hematomas, Putaminal
Bleeding into the PUTAMEN, a BASAL GANGLIA nucleus. This is a relatively common site of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and is associated with chronic HYPERTENSION and lipohyalinosis of small blood vessels in the putamen. Clinical manifestations vary with the size of hemorrhage, but include hemiparesis, headache, and alterations of consciousness.

Hematomas, Spinal Subdural
Extravasation and subsequent accumulation of blood in the subdural space between the dural and arachnoidal layers of the meninges. This condition primarily occurs over the surface of a cerebral hemisphere, but may develop in the posterior fossa and spinal canal. Acute (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, ACUTE) and chronic (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, CHRONIC) forms exist.

Hematomas, Subdural
Extravasation and subsequent accumulation of blood in the subdural space between the dural and arachnoidal layers of the meninges. This condition primarily occurs over the surface of a cerebral hemisphere, but may develop in the posterior fossa and spinal canal. Acute (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, ACUTE) and chronic (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, CHRONIC) forms exist.

Hematomas, Traumatic Brainstem
Extravasation of blood into the midbrain, pons, or medulla following CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY is commonly associated. Clinical manifestations which may be associated with this condition include OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; ATAXIA; PARALYSIS; PERSISTENT VEGETATIVE STATE; and COMA.

Hematomas, Traumatic Cerebral
Bleeding into the CEREBRAL CORTEX; CORPUS CALLOSUM; BASAL GANGLIA, or subcortical white matter following CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY, cerebral edema, and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION are frequently associated conditions. Relatively frequent clinical manifestations include SEIZURES; APHASIA; VISION DISORDERS; MOVEMENT DISORDERS; PARALYSIS, and COMA.

Hematomas, Traumatic Intracranial
Bleeding within the cranial vault induced by penetrating and nonpenetrating traumatic injuries, including hemorrhages into the epidural, subdural and subarachnoid spaces, cerebral hemispheres, DIENCEPHALON; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM.

Hematomas, Traumatic Subdural
Extravasation and subsequent accumulation of blood in the subdural space between the dural and arachnoidal layers of the meninges. This condition primarily occurs over the surface of a cerebral hemisphere, but may develop in the posterior fossa and spinal canal. Acute (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, ACUTE) and chronic (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, CHRONIC) forms exist.

Hematometra
An accumulation of blood in the uterus. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Hematometras
An accumulation of blood in the uterus. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Hematomyelia
Hypoxic-ischemic and hemorrhagic disorders of the spinal cord. ARTERIOSCLEROSIS, emboli, and vascular malformations are potential causes of these conditions.

Hematomyelias
Hypoxic-ischemic and hemorrhagic disorders of the spinal cord. ARTERIOSCLEROSIS, emboli, and vascular malformations are potential causes of these conditions.

Hematopoieses, Extramedullary
The formation and development of blood cells outside the bone marrow, as in the spleen, liver, or lymph nodes.

Hematopoiesis
The development and formation of various types of blood cells.

Hematopoiesis, Extramedullary
The formation and development of blood cells outside the bone marrow, as in the spleen, liver, or lymph nodes.

Hematopoiesis, Medullary
The development and formation of various types of blood cells.

Hematopoietic Agents
Agents which improve the quality of the blood, increasing the hemoglobin level and the number of erythrocytes. They are used in the treatment of anemias.

Hematopoietic Cell Growth Factor
These growth factors comprise a family of hematopoietic regulators with biological specificities defined by their ability to support proliferation and differentiation of blood cells of different lineages. ERYTHROPOIETIN and the COLONY-STIMULATING FACTORS belong to this family. Some of these factors have been studied and used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes.

Hematopoietic Cell Growth Factors
These growth factors comprise a family of hematopoietic regulators with biological specificities defined by their ability to support proliferation and differentiation of blood cells of different lineages. ERYTHROPOIETIN and the COLONY-STIMULATING FACTORS belong to this family. Some of these factors have been studied and used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes.

Hematopoietic CGF
These growth factors comprise a family of hematopoietic regulators with biological specificities defined by their ability to support proliferation and differentiation of blood cells of different lineages. ERYTHROPOIETIN and the COLONY-STIMULATING FACTORS belong to this family. Some of these factors have been studied and used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes.

Hematopoietic Colony-Forming Unit
Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.

Hematopoietic Colony-Forming Units
Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.

Hematopoietic Growth Factor Receptor
Cell surface receptors for colony stimulating factors, local mediators, and hormones that regulate the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hemopoietic cells.

Hematopoietic Growth Factors Receptors
Cell surface receptors for colony stimulating factors, local mediators, and hormones that regulate the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hemopoietic cells.

Hematopoietic Malignancies
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.

Hematopoietic Malignancy
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.

Hematopoietic Neoplasm
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.

Hematopoietic Neoplasms
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.

Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell
Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.

Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells
Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.

Hematopoietic stem cell
A stem cell from which all red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets develop.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell
Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization
The release of stem cells from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood circulation for the purpose of leukapheresis, prior to stem cell transplantion. Hematopoietic growth factors or chemotherapeutic agents often are used to stimulate the mobilization.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Purging
Techniques for the removal of subpopulations of cells (usually residual tumor cells) from the bone marrow ex vivo before it is infused. The purging is achieved by a variety of agents including pharmacologic agents, biophysical agents (laser photoirradiation or radioisotopes) and immunologic agents. Bone marrow purging is used in both autologous and allogeneic BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Stimulators
These growth factors comprise a family of hematopoietic regulators with biological specificities defined by their ability to support proliferation and differentiation of blood cells of different lineages. ERYTHROPOIETIN and the COLONY-STIMULATING FACTORS belong to this family. Some of these factors have been studied and used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
The transference of stem cells from one animal or human to another (allogeneic), or within the same individual (autologous). The source for the stem cells may be the bone marrow or peripheral blood. Stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to autologous bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell-Activating Factors
These growth factors comprise a family of hematopoietic regulators with biological specificities defined by their ability to support proliferation and differentiation of blood cells of different lineages. ERYTHROPOIETIN and the COLONY-STIMULATING FACTORS belong to this family. Some of these factors have been studied and used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes.

Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.

Hematopoietic-CGF
These growth factors comprise a family of hematopoietic regulators with biological specificities defined by their ability to support proliferation and differentiation of blood cells of different lineages. ERYTHROPOIETIN and the COLONY-STIMULATING FACTORS belong to this family. Some of these factors have been studied and used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes.

Hematopoietin 1
These growth factors comprise a family of hematopoietic regulators with biological specificities defined by their ability to support proliferation and differentiation of blood cells of different lineages. ERYTHROPOIETIN and the COLONY-STIMULATING FACTORS belong to this family. Some of these factors have been studied and used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes.

Hematopoietin 2
These growth factors comprise a family of hematopoietic regulators with biological specificities defined by their ability to support proliferation and differentiation of blood cells of different lineages. ERYTHROPOIETIN and the COLONY-STIMULATING FACTORS belong to this family. Some of these factors have been studied and used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes.

Hematopoietin-1
These growth factors comprise a family of hematopoietic regulators with biological specificities defined by their ability to support proliferation and differentiation of blood cells of different lineages. ERYTHROPOIETIN and the COLONY-STIMULATING FACTORS belong to this family. Some of these factors have been studied and used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes.

Hematopoietin-2
These growth factors comprise a family of hematopoietic regulators with biological specificities defined by their ability to support proliferation and differentiation of blood cells of different lineages. ERYTHROPOIETIN and the COLONY-STIMULATING FACTORS belong to this family. Some of these factors have been studied and used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes.

Hematopoietins
These growth factors comprise a family of hematopoietic regulators with biological specificities defined by their ability to support proliferation and differentiation of blood cells of different lineages. ERYTHROPOIETIN and the COLONY-STIMULATING FACTORS belong to this family. Some of these factors have been studied and used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes.

Hematoporphyrin
Iron-free derivatives of heme with 4 methyl groups, 2 hydroxyethyl groups and 2 propionic acid groups attached to the pyrrole rings. Some of these PHOTOSENSITIZING AGENTS are used in the PHOTOTHERAPY of malignant NEOPLASMS.

Hematoporphyrin D
A complex mixture of monomeric and aggregated porphyrins used in the photodynamic therapy of tumors (HEMATOPORPHYRIN PHOTORADIATION). A purified component of this mixture is known as DIHEMATOPORPHYRIN ETHER.

Hematoporphyrin Derivative
A complex mixture of monomeric and aggregated porphyrins used in the photodynamic therapy of tumors (HEMATOPORPHYRIN PHOTORADIATION). A purified component of this mixture is known as DIHEMATOPORPHYRIN ETHER.

Hematoporphyrin Photochemotherapy
Photochemotherapy using visible light, usually red, topically or delivered locally by fiberoptic probe to tissues sensitized with hematoporphyrins.

Hematoporphyrin Photoradiation
Photochemotherapy using visible light, usually red, topically or delivered locally by fiberoptic probe to tissues sensitized with hematoporphyrins.

Hematoporphyrin YHPD
A complex mixture of monomeric and aggregated porphyrins used in the photodynamic therapy of tumors (HEMATOPORPHYRIN PHOTORADIATION). A purified component of this mixture is known as DIHEMATOPORPHYRIN ETHER.

Hematoporphyrins
Iron-free derivatives of heme with 4 methyl groups, 2 hydroxyethyl groups and 2 propionic acid groups attached to the pyrrole rings. Some of these PHOTOSENSITIZING AGENTS are used in the PHOTOTHERAPY of malignant NEOPLASMS.

Hematoside
A ganglioside present in abnormally large amounts in the brain and liver due to a deficient biosynthetic enzyme, G(M3):UDP-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase. Deficiency of this enzyme prevents the formation of G(M2) ganglioside from G(M3) ganglioside and is the cause of an anabolic sphingolipidosis.

Hematoxiline
A dye obtained from the heartwood of logwood (Haematoxylon campechianum Linn., Leguminosae) used as a stain in microscopy and in the manufacture of ink.

Hematoxins
Substances, usually of biological origin, that destroy blood cells; they may be antibodies or other immunologic factors, toxins, enzymes, etc.; hemotoxins are toxic to blood in general, including the clotting mechanism; hematotoxins may refer to the hematopoietic system.

Hematoxylin
A dye obtained from the heartwood of logwood (Haematoxylon campechianum Linn., Leguminosae) used as a stain in microscopy and in the manufacture of ink.

Hematuria
The presence of blood in the urine.

Hematurias
Presence of blood in the urine.



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Hemagglutination, Viral
Agglutination of erythrocytes by a virus.

Hemangioma, Extracerebral Cavernous
A vascular malformation composed of clusters of large, thin walled veins lacking intervening nervous tissue. They are most common in the BRAIN STEM but may also occur in the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions have a tendency to rupture and cause a variety of clinical deficits (e.g., SEIZURES; hemiparesis) that depend upon the location of the hemorrhage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp851-2)

Hemangioma, Cerebral Cavernous
A vascular malformation composed of clusters of large, thin walled veins lacking intervening nervous tissue. They are most common in the BRAIN STEM but may also occur in the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions have a tendency to rupture and cause a variety of clinical deficits (e.g., SEIZURES; hemiparesis) that depend upon the location of the hemorrhage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp851-2)

Hemangioma, Cavernous, Central Nervous System
A vascular malformation composed of clusters of large, thin walled veins lacking intervening nervous tissue. They are most common in the BRAIN STEM but may also occur in the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The lesions have a tendency to rupture and cause a variety of clinical deficits (e.g., SEIZURES; hemiparesis) that depend upon the location of the hemorrhage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp851-2)

Hemangioma, Cavernous
A vascular tumor preponderantly composed of large dilated blood vessels, often containing large amounts of blood, occurring in the skin, subcutaneously, or both, and also in many viscera, particularly the liver, spleen, pancreas, and sometimes the brain. The typical superficial lesions are bright to dark red in color; deep lesions have a blue color. A cavernous hemangioma in the skin extends more deeply than a capillary hemangioma and is less likely to regress spontaneously. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Stedman, 25th ed)

Hemangioma

Hemangioma, Capillary
A dull red, firm, dome-shaped hemangioma, sharply demarcated from surrounding skin, usually located on the head and neck, which grows rapidly and generally undergoes regression and involution without scarring. It is caused by proliferation of immature capillary vessels in active stroma, and is usually present at birth or occurs within the first two or three months of life. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Hemangioendotheliomas
A neoplasm derived from blood vessels, characterized by numerous prominent endothelial cells that occur singly, in aggregates, and as the lining of congeries of vascular tubes or channels. Hemangioendotheliomas are relatively rare and are of intermediate malignancy (between benign hemangiomas and conventional angiosarcomas). They affect men and women about equally and rarely develop in childhood. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)

Hemangioendothelioma
A neoplasm derived from blood vessels, characterized by numerous prominent endothelial cells that occur singly, in aggregates, and as the lining of congeries of vascular tubes or channels. Hemangioendotheliomas are relatively rare and are of intermediate malignancy (between benign hemangiomas and conventional angiosarcomas). They affect men and women about equally and rarely develop in childhood. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)

Hemangioblastomas
A benign tumor of the nervous system that may occur sporadically or in association with HIPPEL-LINDAU DISEASE. It accounts for approximately 2% of intracranial tumors, arising most frequently in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. Histologically, the tumors are composed of multiple capillary and sinusoidal channels lined with endothelial cells and clusters of lipid-laden pseudoxanthoma cells. Usually solitary, these tumors can be multiple and may also occur in the brain stem, spinal cord, retina, and supratentorial compartment. Cerebellar hemangioblastomas usually present in the third decade with INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, and ataxia. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2071-2)

Hemangioblastomas, Multiple
A benign tumor of the nervous system that may occur sporadically or in association with HIPPEL-LINDAU DISEASE. It accounts for approximately 2% of intracranial tumors, arising most frequently in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. Histologically, the tumors are composed of multiple capillary and sinusoidal channels lined with endothelial cells and clusters of lipid-laden pseudoxanthoma cells. Usually solitary, these tumors can be multiple and may also occur in the brain stem, spinal cord, retina, and supratentorial compartment. Cerebellar hemangioblastomas usually present in the third decade with INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, and ataxia. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2071-2)

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   emangioma / hmangioma / heangioma / hemngioma / hemagioma / hemanioma / hemangoma / hemangima / hemangioa / hemangiom / hhemangioma / heemangioma / hemmangioma / hemaangioma / hemanngioma / hemanggioma / hemangiioma / hemangiooma / hemangiomma / hemangiomaa / yemangioma / uemangioma / jemangioma / nemangioma / bemangioma / gemangioma / temangioma / h3mangioma / h4mangioma / hrmangioma / hfmangioma / hdmangioma / hsmangioma / hwmangioma / henangioma / hejangioma / hekangioma / he,angioma / he angioma / hemqngioma / hemwngioma / hemsngioma / hemxngioma / hemzngioma / hemabgioma / hemahgioma / hemajgioma / hemamgioma / hema gioma / hemantioma / hemangoma / hemangi9ma / hemangi0ma / hemangipma / hemangilma / hemangikma / hemangiima / hemangi8ma / hemangiona / hemangioja / hemangioka / hemangio,a / hemangio a / hemangiomq / hemangiomw / hemangioms / hemangiomx / hemangiomz /