Heart
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  Heart



Heart

   The hollow, muscular organ responsible for pumping blood through the circulatory system.

RELATED TERMS
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Organ
A structural unit of an animal or plant that serves a specific function.

Blood
The life-maintaining fluid which is made up of plasma, red blood cells (erythrocytes), white blood cells (leukocytes), and platelets; blood circulates through the body's heart, arteries, veins, and capillaries; it carries away waste matter and carbon dioxide, and brings nourishment, electrolytes, hormones, vitamins, antibodies, heat, and oxygen to the tissues.

Circulatory
Having to do with the circulation, the movement of fluid in a regular or circuitous course. Although the adjective "circulatory" need not necessarily refer to the circulation of the blood, for all practical purposes today it does. A circulatory problem is taken usually to be a problem with the blood circulation, for example with heart failure.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Hearing
The sensation of sound.

Hearing Aid
Wearable sound-amplifying devices that are intended to compensate for impaired hearing. These generic devices include air-conduction hearing aids and bone-conduction hearing aids. (UMDNS, 1999)

Hearing Aids
Wearable sound-amplifying devices that are intended to compensate for impaired hearing. These generic devices include air-conduction hearing aids and bone-conduction hearing aids. (UMDNS, 1999)

Hearing Disorder
Conditions that impair the transmission or perception of auditory impulses and information from the level of the ear to the temporal cortices, including the sensorineural pathways.

Hearing Disorders
Conditions that impair the transmission or perception of auditory impulses and information from the level of the ear to the temporal cortices, including the sensorineural pathways.

Hearing Impaired Person
Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.

Hearing Impaired Persons
Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.

Hearing Impaired Rehabilitation
Procedures for assisting a person with a hearing disorder to maximum comprehension in communication.

Hearing impairment
Complete or partial loss of the ability to hear, caused by a variety of injuries or diseases, including congenital causes. Limitations, including difficulties in understanding language or other auditory messages and/or in production of understandable speech, are possible.

Hearing Impairment
A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears. Deafness may result from EAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; or BRAIN DISEASES.

Hearing Impairments
A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears. Deafness may result from EAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; or BRAIN DISEASES.

Hearing Loss
A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears. Deafness may result from EAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; or BRAIN DISEASES.

Hearing Loss, Bilateral
Partial hearing loss in both ears.

Hearing Loss, Central
Hearing loss due to disease of the central nervous system auditory pathways, which originate in the cochlear nuclei of the pons and then ascend bilaterally to reach the inferior colliculi of the midbrain, medial geniculate bodies of the thalamus, and then the auditory cortices located in the temporal lobes. Bilateral lesions of the auditory pathways are usually required to cause central hearing loss. Cortical deafness refers to loss of hearing due to bilateral auditory cortex lesions. Unilateral brain stem lesions involving the cochlear nuclei may result in unilateral hearing loss.

Hearing Loss, Complete
A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears. Deafness may result from EAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; or BRAIN DISEASES.

Hearing Loss, Conductive
Hearing loss due to interference with the acoustic transmission of sound to the cochlea. The interference is in the outer or middle ear.

Hearing Loss, Extreme
A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears. Deafness may result from EAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; or BRAIN DISEASES.

Hearing Loss, Functional
Hearing loss without a physical basis.

Hearing Loss, High Frequency
Hearing loss in frequencies above 1000 hertz.

Hearing Loss, High-Frequency
Hearing loss in frequencies above 1000 hertz.

Hearing Loss, Mixed Conductive Sensorineural
Conditions that impair the transmission or perception of auditory impulses and information from the level of the ear to the temporal cortices, including the sensorineural pathways.

Hearing Loss, Mixed Conductive-Sensorineural
Conditions that impair the transmission or perception of auditory impulses and information from the level of the ear to the temporal cortices, including the sensorineural pathways.

Hearing Loss, Noise Induced
Hearing loss from exposure to noise. The loss is often in the frequency range 4000-6000 hertz.

Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced
Hearing loss from exposure to noise. The loss is often in the frequency range 4000-6000 hertz.

Hearing Loss, Nonorganic
Hearing loss without a physical basis.

Hearing Loss, Partial
A condition in which the sense of hearing, although defective, is functional with or without a hearing aid. The hearing loss may affect one or both ears. The normal hearing level for speech is approximately 40-70 decibels I.S.O. (International Organization for Standardization) or 30-60 db A.S.A. (American Standards Association).

Hearing Loss, Psychogenic
Hearing loss without a physical basis.

Hearing Loss, Sensorineural
Hearing loss resulting from damage to the sensory mechanism internal from the oval and round windows.

Hearing Losses
A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears. Deafness may result from EAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; or BRAIN DISEASES.

Hearing Losses, Bilateral
Partial hearing loss in both ears.

Hearing Losses, Complete
A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears. Deafness may result from EAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; or BRAIN DISEASES.

Hearing Losses, Extreme
A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears. Deafness may result from EAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; or BRAIN DISEASES.

Hearing Losses, Sensorineural
Hearing loss resulting from damage to the sensory mechanism internal from the oval and round windows.

Hearing Protective Device
Personal devices for protection of the ears from loud or high intensity noise, water, or cold. These include earmuffs and earplugs.

Hearing Protective Devices
Personal devices for protection of the ears from loud or high intensity noise, water, or cold. These include earmuffs and earplugs.

Hearing, Distorted
Conditions that impair the transmission or perception of auditory impulses and information from the level of the ear to the temporal cortices, including the sensorineural pathways.

Hearings
The sensation of sound.

Heart Abnormalities
Imperfections or malformations of the heart, existing at birth.

Heart Abnormality
Imperfections or malformations of the heart, existing at birth.

Heart Aneurysm
An aneurysmal dilatation of a portion of the wall of the ventricle, usually the left, or, rarely, a saccular protrusion through it (false aneurysm of the heart). It is usually consequent to myocardial infarction but other causes such as bacterial endocarditis or trauma have been described. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Heart Aneurysms
An aneurysmal dilatation of a portion of the wall of the ventricle, usually the left, or, rarely, a saccular protrusion through it (false aneurysm of the heart). It is usually consequent to myocardial infarction but other causes such as bacterial endocarditis or trauma have been described. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Heart Arrest
Cessation of the heart beat.

Heart Arrest, Induced
Arrest of the contraction of the myocardium by the use of cardioplegic chemical compounds (CARDIOPLEGIC SOLUTIONS) or of cold during heart surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p269)

Heart Assist Devices
Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the left ventricle, to pump blood; they consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors; the devices are used after myocardial infarction or to wean the repaired heart from the heart-lung machine after open-heart surgery.

Heart Association, American
A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.

Heart Associations, American
A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.

Heart Atrium
The upper right and left chambers of the heart.

Heart Atrium Appendage
Ear-shaped appendage of either atrium of the heart. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Heart Atrium Appendages
Ear-shaped appendage of either atrium of the heart. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Heart Atriums
The upper right and left chambers of the heart.

Heart attack
Heart attacks occur when a coronary artery is completely blocked and a portion of the heart muscle is left without a supply of oxygenated blood. If the portion is large enough, the heart attack may be deadly.

Heart Attack (myocardial infarction)
Permanent damage to the heart muscle caused by a lack of blood supply to the heart for an extended time period. The severity of damage varies from normal, mild, to severe.

Heart Auscultation
Act of listening for sounds within the heart.

Heart Auscultations
Act of listening for sounds within the heart.

Heart block
Interrupted electrical impulse to heart muscles.

Heart Block
An arrhythmia. The electrical current is slowed between the atria and ventricles. In more severe cases, conduction is blocked completely and the atria and ventricles beat independently.

Heart Blocks
Impairment of conduction in heart excitation. It is often applied specifically to atrioventricular heart block. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Heart Bypass, Left
Diversion of the flow of blood from the pulmonary veins directly to the aorta, avoiding the left atrium and the left ventricle (Dorland, 27th ed). This is a temporary procedure usually performed to assist other surgical procedures.

Heart Bypass, Right
Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance to the right atrium directly to the pulmonary arteries, avoiding the right atrium and right ventricle (Dorland, 28th ed). This a permanent procedure often performed to bypass a congenitally deformed right atrium or right ventricle.

Heart Bypasses, Left
Diversion of the flow of blood from the pulmonary veins directly to the aorta, avoiding the left atrium and the left ventricle (Dorland, 27th ed). This is a temporary procedure usually performed to assist other surgical procedures.

Heart Bypasses, Right
Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance to the right atrium directly to the pulmonary arteries, avoiding the right atrium and right ventricle (Dorland, 28th ed). This a permanent procedure often performed to bypass a congenitally deformed right atrium or right ventricle.

Heart Catheterization
Procedure which includes placement of catheter, recording of intracardiac and intravascular pressure, obtaining blood samples for chemical analysis, and cardiac output measurement, etc. Specific angiographic injection techniques are also involved.

Heart Catheterizations
Procedure which includes placement of catheter, recording of intracardiac and intravascular pressure, obtaining blood samples for chemical analysis, and cardiac output measurement, etc. Specific angiographic injection techniques are also involved.

Heart Conduction System
An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle and having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.

Heart Conduction Systems
An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle and having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.

Heart Contractilities
Contractile activity of the heart.

Heart Contractility
Contractile activity of the heart.

Heart Defect, Congenital
Imperfections or malformations of the heart, existing at birth.

Heart Defects, Congenital
Imperfections or malformations of the heart, existing at birth.

Heart disease
Usually, heart disese occurs due to inadequate blood flow to the hear muscle. This occurs when the arteries that supply the heart muscle (the coronary arteries) become partially or completely blocked. Obese people are at increased risk of heart disease due to their higher rates of hypercholesterolemia, diabetes and hypertension.

Heart Disease, Carcinoid
Cardiac manifestation of MALIGNANT CARCINOID SYNDROME. It is a unique form of fibrosis involving the endocardium, primarily of the right heart. The fibrous deposits tend to cause constriction of the tricuspid and pulmonary valves. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1307)

Heart Disease, Coronary
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the coronary vessels to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.

Heart Disease, Ischemic
A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERIOSCLEROSIS), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).

Heart Disease, Rheumatic
The most important manifestation of and sequel to rheumatic fever, i.e., any cardiac involvement in rheumatic fever. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Heart Disease, Valvular
Diseases caused by or resulting in abnormal functioning of heart valves.

Heart Diseases, Carcinoid
Cardiac manifestation of MALIGNANT CARCINOID SYNDROME. It is a unique form of fibrosis involving the endocardium, primarily of the right heart. The fibrous deposits tend to cause constriction of the tricuspid and pulmonary valves. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1307)

Heart Diseases, Coronary
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the coronary vessels to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.

Heart Diseases, Ischemic
A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERIOSCLEROSIS), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).

Heart Diseases, Rheumatic
The most important manifestation of and sequel to rheumatic fever, i.e., any cardiac involvement in rheumatic fever. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Heart Diseases, Valvular
Diseases caused by or resulting in abnormal functioning of heart valves.

Heart Enlargement
Hypertrophy or enlargement of the heart.

Heart failure
Inability of the heart to adequately pump blood.

Heart Failure (congestive heart failure, CHF)
A chronic, progressive disease in which the myocardium (heart muscle) weakens and can not pump blood efficiently. Fluid accumulates in the lungs, hands, ankles, or other parts of the body.

Heart Grafting
The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.

Heart Graftings
The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.

Heart Hospital Of Bakersfield L.L.C.
The Heart Hospital Of Bakersfield L.L.C. is a hospital in Bakersfield, California, United States.

Heart Hospital of South Dakota
The Heart Hospital of South Dakota is a hospital in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, United States.

Heart Hypertrophy
Hypertrophy or enlargement of the heart.

Heart Injuries
General or unspecified injuries to the heart.

Heart Injury
General or unspecified injuries to the heart.

Heart Lung Bypass
Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.

Heart Lung Bypass Machine
A machine that oxygenates the blood and circulates it throughout the body during surgery.

Heart Lung Transplantation
The simultaneous, or near simultaneous, transference of heart and lungs from one human or animal to another.

Heart Massage
Rhythmic compression of the heart by pressure applied manually over the sternum (closed heart massage) or directly to the heart through an opening in the chest wall (open heart massage). It is done to reinstate and maintain circulation. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Heart Massages
Rhythmic compression of the heart by pressure applied manually over the sternum (closed heart massage) or directly to the heart through an opening in the chest wall (open heart massage). It is done to reinstate and maintain circulation. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Heart Mitochondria
The mitochondria of the myocardium.

Heart Mitochondrion
The mitochondria of the myocardium.

Heart Monitor
An electrocardiography machine designed to monitor heart function continuously.

Heart Murmur
Abnormal heart sounds heard during auscultation caused by alterations in the flow of blood into a chamber, through a valve, or by a valve opening or closing abnormally. They are classified by the time of occurrence during the cardiac cycle, the duration, and the intensity of the sound on a scale of I to V.

Heart Murmurs
Abnormal heart sounds heard during auscultation caused by alterations in the flow of blood into a chamber, through a valve, or by a valve opening or closing abnormally. They are classified by the time of occurrence during the cardiac cycle, the duration, and the intensity of the sound on a scale of I to V.

Heart Muscle
The muscle tissue of the HEART composed of striated, involuntary muscle known as cardiac muscle.

Heart Muscles
The muscle tissue of the HEART composed of striated, involuntary muscle known as cardiac muscle.

Heart of America Medical Center
Heart of America Medical Center is a hospital in Rugby, North Dakota (USA).

Heart of Tampa
Heart of Tampa is a hospital in Hudson, Florida (USA).

Heart Rate, Fetal
The heart rate of the fetus. The normal range at term is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.

Heart Rates, Fetal
The heart rate of the fetus. The normal range at term is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.

Heart Rupture
Laceration or tearing of the walls of the heart, of the interatrial or interventricular septum, of the papillary muscles or chordae tendineae, or of any of the valves of the heart. Rupture may be due to a variety of pathological entities, however, the majority are secondary to myocardial infarction (HEART RUPTURE, POST-INFARCTION).

Heart Rupture, Post Infarction
Rupture of the heart after myocardial infarction.

Heart Rupture, Post-Infarction
Rupture of the heart after myocardial infarction.

Heart Rupture, Traumatic
General or unspecified injuries to the heart.

Heart Ruptures
Laceration or tearing of the walls of the heart, of the interatrial or interventricular septum, of the papillary muscles or chordae tendineae, or of any of the valves of the heart. Rupture may be due to a variety of pathological entities, however, the majority are secondary to myocardial infarction (HEART RUPTURE, POST-INFARCTION).

Heart Ruptures, Post-Infarction
Rupture of the heart after myocardial infarction.

Heart Ruptures, Traumatic
General or unspecified injuries to the heart.

Heart Septa
The thin membranous structure between the two heart atria or the thick muscular structure between the two heart ventricles.

Heart Septal Defect
Defects in the cardiac septa, resulting in abnormal communications between the opposite chambers of the heart.

Heart Septal Defects
Defects in the cardiac septa, resulting in abnormal communications between the opposite chambers of the heart.

Heart Septal Defects, Atrial
Defects in the septum between the atria of the heart, due to failure of fusion between either the septum secundum or the septum primum and the endocardial cushions.

Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular
Congenital defects in the septum between the cardiac ventricles, most often due to failure of the bulbar septum to completely close the interventricular foramen.

Heart Septum
The thin membranous structure between the two heart atria or the thick muscular structure between the two heart ventricles.

Heart Sound
The sounds heard over the cardiac region produced by the functioning of the heart. There are four distinct sounds: the first occurs at the beginning of systole and is heard as a ""lubb"" sound; the second is produced by the closing of the aortic and pulmonary valves and is heard as a ""dupp"" sound; the third is produced by vibrations of the ventricular walls when suddenly distended by the rush of blood from the atria; and the fourth is produced by atrial contraction and ventricular filling but is rarely audible in the normal heart. The physiological concept of HEART SOUNDS is differentiated from the pathological HEART MURMURS.

Heart Sounds
The sounds heard over the cardiac region produced by the functioning of the heart. There are four distinct sounds: the first occurs at the beginning of systole and is heard as a ""lubb"" sound; the second is produced by the closing of the aortic and pulmonary valves and is heard as a ""dupp"" sound; the third is produced by vibrations of the ventricular walls when suddenly distended by the rush of blood from the atria; and the fourth is produced by atrial contraction and ventricular filling but is rarely audible in the normal heart. The physiological concept of HEART SOUNDS is differentiated from the pathological HEART MURMURS.

Heart Surgery
Heart surgery is any surgery, which involves the heart or heart valves.

Heart Surgical Procedure
Surgery performed on the heart.

Heart Surgical Procedures
Surgery performed on the heart.

Heart Syndrome, Hyperkinetic
A clinical syndrome characterized by palpitation, shortness of breath, labored breathing, subjective complaints of effort and discomfort, all following slight exertion. Other symptoms may be dizziness, tremulousness, sweating, and insomnia. Neurocirculatory asthenia is most typically seen as a form of anxiety disorder.

Heart Transplantation
The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.

Heart Transplantations
The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.

Heart Valve
There are four valves in the heart: the tricuspid and the mitral valve, which lie between the atria and ventricles and the pulmonic and aortic valves which lie between the ventricles and the blood vessels leaving the heart. The heart valves help to maintain one-way blood flow through the heart.

Heart Valve Disease
Diseases caused by or resulting in abnormal functioning of heart valves.

Heart Valve Diseases
Diseases caused by or resulting in abnormal functioning of heart valves.

Heart valve prolapse
A condition of the heart valve in which it is partially open when it should be closed.

Heart Valve Prolapse
Displacement of the valves of the heart.

Heart Valve Prolapses
Displacement of the valves of the heart.

Heart Valve Prostheses
A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.

Heart Valve Prosthesis
A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.

Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation
Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.

Heart Valve Protheses
A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.

Heart Valve Prothesis
A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.

Heart Valves
Flaps of tissue that prevent regurgitation of blood from the ventricles to the atria or from the pulmonary arteries or aorta to the ventricles.

Heart Ventricle
The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right pumps venous blood into the lungs and the left pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.

Heart Ventricle, Artificial
Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the left ventricle, to pump blood; they consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors; the devices are used after myocardial infarction or to wean the repaired heart from the heart-lung machine after open-heart surgery.

Heart Ventricles
The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right pumps venous blood into the lungs and the left pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.

Heart Ventricles, Artificial
Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the left ventricle, to pump blood; they consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors; the devices are used after myocardial infarction or to wean the repaired heart from the heart-lung machine after open-heart surgery.

Heart Volume
The volume of the heart, usually relating to the volume of blood contained within it at various periods of the cardiac cycle. The amount of blood ejected from a ventricle at each beat is STROKE VOLUME.

Heart Volumes
The volume of the heart, usually relating to the volume of blood contained within it at various periods of the cardiac cycle. The amount of blood ejected from a ventricle at each beat is STROKE VOLUME.

Heart, Artificial
A pumping mechanism that duplicates the output, rate, and blood pressure of the natural heart. It may replace the function of the entire heart or a portion of it, and may be an intracorporeal, extracorporeal, or paracorporeal heart. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Heart, Crisscross
Cardiac malformation characterized by an atrioventricular spatial relation that places or appears to place each ventricle in a contralateral position relative to its associated atrium.

Heart, Enlarged
Hypertrophy or enlargement of the heart.

Heart, Fetal
The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.

Heart, Triatrial
A congenital anomaly characterized by the presence in the atrium of a perforated muscular membrane which separates the atrium into upper and lower chambers.

Heart-Assist Device
Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the left ventricle, to pump blood; they consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors; the devices are used after myocardial infarction or to wean the repaired heart from the heart-lung machine after open-heart surgery.

Heart-Assist Devices
Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the left ventricle, to pump blood; they consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors; the devices are used after myocardial infarction or to wean the repaired heart from the heart-lung machine after open-heart surgery.

Heart-Assist Pump
Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the left ventricle, to pump blood; they consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors; the devices are used after myocardial infarction or to wean the repaired heart from the heart-lung machine after open-heart surgery.

Heart-Assist Pumps
Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the left ventricle, to pump blood; they consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors; the devices are used after myocardial infarction or to wean the repaired heart from the heart-lung machine after open-heart surgery.

Heart-Lung Bypass
Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.

Heart-Lung Bypasses
Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.

Heart-Lung Grafting
The simultaneous, or near simultaneous, transference of heart and lungs from one human or animal to another.

Heart-Lung Graftings
The simultaneous, or near simultaneous, transference of heart and lungs from one human or animal to another.

Heart-lung machine
A machine that performs for the heart during open heart surgery.

Heart-Lung Transplantation
The simultaneous, or near simultaneous, transference of heart and lungs from one human or animal to another.

Heart-Lung Transplantations
The simultaneous, or near simultaneous, transference of heart and lungs from one human or animal to another.

Heartburn
Substernal pain or burning sensation, usually associated with regurgitation of gastric juice into the esophagus.

Heartland Behavioral Health Services
The Heartland Behavioral Health Services is a hospital in Nevada, Missouri, United States.

Heartland Health Care Center
The Heartland Health Care Center is a hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States.

Heartland Regional Medical Center
Heartland Regional Medical Center is a hospital in Saint Joseph, Missouri (USA).

Hearts
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.

Hearts, Artificial
A pumping mechanism that duplicates the output, rate, and blood pressure of the natural heart. It may replace the function of the entire heart or a portion of it, and may be an intracorporeal, extracorporeal, or paracorporeal heart. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Hearts, Crisscross
Cardiac malformation characterized by an atrioventricular spatial relation that places or appears to place each ventricle in a contralateral position relative to its associated atrium.

Hearts, Fetal
The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.

Hearts, Triatrial
A congenital anomaly characterized by the presence in the atrium of a perforated muscular membrane which separates the atrium into upper and lower chambers.

Heartwater Disease
A tick-borne septicemic disease of ruminants caused by Cowdria ruminantium.

Heartwater Diseases
A tick-borne septicemic disease of ruminants caused by Cowdria ruminantium.

Heartworm Disease
Infection with nematodes of the genus DIROFILARIA, usually in animals, especially dogs, but occasionally in man.



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Hammer
The malleus, a hammer-shaped bone in the middle ear.

Hamstring
The tendon located in the back of the knee and lower thigh.

Hand-foot-and-mouth disease
A viral infection characterized by a blister-like rash of the hands, feet and mouth.

Hangnail
A loose piece of skin at one side of a fingernail.

Harelip
Cleft lip or palate.

Heart

Heart failure
Inability of the heart to adequately pump blood.

Heat exhaustion
Headache, profuse sweating, weakness, muscle cramps, nausea and vomiting caused by excessive exposure to heat.

Hematuria
The presence of blood in the urine.

Hemolysis
The destruction of red blood cells.

Hemoptysis
A cough that produces blood.

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