Headaches
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  Headaches



Headaches

   Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

RELATED TERMS
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Pain
An unpleasant sensory or emotional experience primarily associated with tissue damage, or described in terms of tissue damage, or both.

Cranial
The anatomical term for towards the head; also the general term for of the head. i.e. the lungs are cranial to the pelvis. See Caudal/Inferior/Superior

Benign
Non-malignant; not life-threatening.

Symptom
A subjective manifestation of a pathological condition. Symptoms are reported by the affected individual rather than observed by the examiner.

HEMORRHAGE
A general term for loss of blood, often profuse, brought about by injury to the blood vessels or by a deficiency of certain necessary blood elements such as platelets.

TRAUMA
Injury caused by external force, chemical, temperature extremes, or poor tooth alignment.

CENTRAL
In anatomy and medicine (as elsewhere), central is the opposite of "peripheral" which means away from the center.

INTRACRANIAL
Within the skull.

HYPERTENSION


Headaches
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Disease
Illness or sickness often characterized by typical patient problems (symptoms) and physical findings (signs). Disruption sequence: The events that occur when a fetus that is developing normally is subjected to a destructive agent such as the rubella (German measles) virus.

HEADACHE
Primary - includes tension (muscular contraction), vascular (migraine), and cluster headaches not caused by other underlying medical conditions. Secondary - includes headaches that result from other medical conditions. These may also be referred to as traction headaches or inflammatory headaches.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Head and Neck Cancer
Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)

Head and Neck Neoplasms
Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)

Head and shoulders conditioner
Head and shoulders conditioner is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): pyrithione zinc.

Head Banging
Motor behavior that is repetitive, often seemingly driven, and nonfunctional. This behavior markedly interferes with normal activities or results in severe bodily self-injury. The behavior is not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance or a general medical condition. (DSM-IV, 1994)

Head Cancer
Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)

Head Down Tilt
Posture while lying with the head lower than the rest of the body. Extended time in this position is associated with temporary physiologic disturbances.

Head Injuries
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Head Injuries, Minor
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Head Injuries, Multiple
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Head Injuries, Open
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Head Injuries, Penetrating
Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.

Head Injuries, Penetrating, Missile
Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.

Head Injuries, Superficial
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Head injury
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures. Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Head Injury
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Head Injury, Minor
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Head Injury, Multiple
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Head Injury, Open
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Head Injury, Penetrating
Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.

Head Injury, Superficial
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Head Lice
Lice of the genus Pediculus, family Pediculidae. Pediculus humanus corporus is the human body louse and Pediculus humanus capitis is the human head louse.

Head Lices
Lice of the genus Pediculus, family Pediculidae. Pediculus humanus corporus is the human body louse and Pediculus humanus capitis is the human head louse.

Head Louse
Lice of the genus Pediculus, family Pediculidae. Pediculus humanus corporus is the human body louse and Pediculus humanus capitis is the human head louse.

Head Louses
Lice of the genus Pediculus, family Pediculidae. Pediculus humanus corporus is the human body louse and Pediculus humanus capitis is the human head louse.

Head Movement
Voluntary or involuntary motion of head that may be relative to or independent of body; includes animals and humans.

Head Movements
Voluntary or involuntary motion of head that may be relative to or independent of body; includes animals and humans.

Head Necrosis, Femur
Aseptic or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The major types are idiopathic (primary), as a complication of fractures or dislocations, and LEGG-PERTHES DISEASE.

Head Neoplasms
Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)

Head Nurse
Administration of nursing services for one or more clinical units.

Head Nurses
Administration of nursing services for one or more clinical units.

Head of Household
Size and composition of the family.

Head Pain
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Head Pains
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Head Protective Device
Personal devices for protection of heads from impact, penetration from falling and flying objects, and from limited electric shock and burn.

Head Protective Devices
Personal devices for protection of heads from impact, penetration from falling and flying objects, and from limited electric shock and burn.

Head Start Program
Procedures and programs that facilitate the development or skill acquisition in infants and young children who have disabilities, who are at risk for developing disabilities, or who are gifted. It includes programs that are designed to prevent handicapping conditions in infants and young children and family-centered programs designed to affect the functioning of infants and children with special needs. (From Journal of Early Intervention, Editorial, 1989, vol. 13, no. 1, p. 3; A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, prepared for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 1976)

Head Start Programs
Procedures and programs that facilitate the development or skill acquisition in infants and young children who have disabilities, who are at risk for developing disabilities, or who are gifted. It includes programs that are designed to prevent handicapping conditions in infants and young children and family-centered programs designed to affect the functioning of infants and children with special needs. (From Journal of Early Intervention, Editorial, 1989, vol. 13, no. 1, p. 3; A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, prepared for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 1976)

Head Trauma
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Head Trauma, Penetrating
Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.

Head Traumas
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Head Traumas, Penetrating
Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.

Head Upright Tilt Test (HUT, tilt table test, head-up tilt test)
A test used to determine the cause of fainting spells. The test involves being tilted at different angles for a period of time. Heart rhythm, blood pressure, and other measurements are evaluated with changes in position.

Head, Femur
The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)

Head, Neck Neoplasms
Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)

Head, Optic Nerve
The portion of the optic nerve seen in the fundus with the ophthalmoscope. It is formed by the meeting of all the retinal ganglion cell axons as they enter the optic nerve.

Head, Sperm
The anterior, usually ovoid, nucleus-containing part of spermatozoa.

Head-Down Tilt
Posture while lying with the head lower than the rest of the body. Extended time in this position is associated with temporary physiologic disturbances.

Headache
Primary - includes tension (muscular contraction), vascular (migraine), and cluster headaches not caused by other underlying medical conditions. Secondary - includes headaches that result from other medical conditions. These may also be referred to as traction headaches or inflammatory headaches.

Headache Disorder
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache Disorders
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache Syndrome
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache Syndrome, Cluster
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Headache Syndrome, Hypnic
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache Syndromes
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache Syndromes, Cluster
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Headache Syndromes, Hypnic
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache, Analgesic Overuse
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache, Analgesic Rebound
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache, Atypical Cluster
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Headache, Benign Exertional
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache, Bilateral
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Cervicogenic
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache, Chronic
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache, Chronic Cluster
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Headache, Chronic Daily
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache, Cluster
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Headache, Cough
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Episodic Cluster
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Headache, Generalized
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Intractable
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache, Migraine
A subtype of vascular headaches characterized by periodic unilateral pulsatile headaches which begin in childhood, adolescence, or early adult life and recur with diminishing frequency during advancing years. The two major subtypes are CLASSIC MIGRAINE (i.e., migraine with aura) and COMMON MIGRAINE (i.e., migraine without aura). Migrainous episodes may be associated with alterations in cerebral blood flow. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p172)

Headache, Ocular
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Orthostatic
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Periorbital
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Post-Dural Puncture
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Post-Lumbar Puncture
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Post-Traumatic
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache, Postdural Puncture
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Psychogenic
A common condition characterized by recurrent occipital, temporal, or frontal pressure-like HEADACHE associated with nuchal discomfort. Mid-life onset and bilateral pain are features which tend to distinguish this condition from COMMON MIGRAINE. ANXIETY and DEPRESSION may aggravate this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp182-3)

Headache, Retro-Ocular
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Sharp
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Sick
A subtype of vascular headaches characterized by periodic unilateral pulsatile headaches which begin in childhood, adolescence, or early adult life and recur with diminishing frequency during advancing years. The two major subtypes are CLASSIC MIGRAINE (i.e., migraine with aura) and COMMON MIGRAINE (i.e., migraine without aura). Migrainous episodes may be associated with alterations in cerebral blood flow. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p172)

Headache, Stabbing
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Stress
A common condition characterized by recurrent occipital, temporal, or frontal pressure-like HEADACHE associated with nuchal discomfort. Mid-life onset and bilateral pain are features which tend to distinguish this condition from COMMON MIGRAINE. ANXIETY and DEPRESSION may aggravate this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp182-3)

Headache, Tension
A common condition characterized by recurrent occipital, temporal, or frontal pressure-like HEADACHE associated with nuchal discomfort. Mid-life onset and bilateral pain are features which tend to distinguish this condition from COMMON MIGRAINE. ANXIETY and DEPRESSION may aggravate this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp182-3)

Headache, Tension-Type
A common condition characterized by recurrent occipital, temporal, or frontal pressure-like HEADACHE associated with nuchal discomfort. Mid-life onset and bilateral pain are features which tend to distinguish this condition from COMMON MIGRAINE. ANXIETY and DEPRESSION may aggravate this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp182-3)

Headache, Tension-Vascular
A common condition characterized by recurrent occipital, temporal, or frontal pressure-like HEADACHE associated with nuchal discomfort. Mid-life onset and bilateral pain are features which tend to distinguish this condition from COMMON MIGRAINE. ANXIETY and DEPRESSION may aggravate this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp182-3)

Headache, Throbbing
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Thunderclap
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Unilateral
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Vascular
A group of disorders characterized by recurrent headaches associated with abnormal dilation and constriction of cerebral blood vessels. Representative disorders from this category include MIGRAINE; CLUSTER HEADACHE; and paroxysmal hemicrania.

Headache, Vertex
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache-primary
Includes tension (muscular contraction), vascular (migraine), and cluster headaches not caused by other underlying medical conditions.

Headache-secondary
Includes headaches that result from other medical conditions. These may also be referred to as traction headaches or inflammatory headaches.

Headaches, Analgesic Overuse
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headaches, Analgesic Rebound
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headaches, Atypical Cluster
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Headaches, Benign Exertional
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headaches, Bilateral
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Cervicogenic
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headaches, Chronic
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headaches, Chronic Cluster
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Headaches, Chronic Daily
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headaches, Cluster
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Headaches, Cough
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Episodic Cluster
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Headaches, Generalized
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Intractable
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headaches, Migraine
A subtype of vascular headaches characterized by periodic unilateral pulsatile headaches which begin in childhood, adolescence, or early adult life and recur with diminishing frequency during advancing years. The two major subtypes are CLASSIC MIGRAINE (i.e., migraine with aura) and COMMON MIGRAINE (i.e., migraine without aura). Migrainous episodes may be associated with alterations in cerebral blood flow. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p172)

Headaches, Ocular
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Orthostatic
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Periorbital
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Post-Dural Puncture
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Post-Lumbar Puncture
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Post-Traumatic
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headaches, Postdural Puncture
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Psychogenic
A common condition characterized by recurrent occipital, temporal, or frontal pressure-like HEADACHE associated with nuchal discomfort. Mid-life onset and bilateral pain are features which tend to distinguish this condition from COMMON MIGRAINE. ANXIETY and DEPRESSION may aggravate this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp182-3)

Headaches, Retro-Ocular
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Sharp
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Sick
A subtype of vascular headaches characterized by periodic unilateral pulsatile headaches which begin in childhood, adolescence, or early adult life and recur with diminishing frequency during advancing years. The two major subtypes are CLASSIC MIGRAINE (i.e., migraine with aura) and COMMON MIGRAINE (i.e., migraine without aura). Migrainous episodes may be associated with alterations in cerebral blood flow. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p172)

Headaches, Stabbing
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Stress
A common condition characterized by recurrent occipital, temporal, or frontal pressure-like HEADACHE associated with nuchal discomfort. Mid-life onset and bilateral pain are features which tend to distinguish this condition from COMMON MIGRAINE. ANXIETY and DEPRESSION may aggravate this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp182-3)

Headaches, Tension
A common condition characterized by recurrent occipital, temporal, or frontal pressure-like HEADACHE associated with nuchal discomfort. Mid-life onset and bilateral pain are features which tend to distinguish this condition from COMMON MIGRAINE. ANXIETY and DEPRESSION may aggravate this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp182-3)

Headaches, Tension-Type
A common condition characterized by recurrent occipital, temporal, or frontal pressure-like HEADACHE associated with nuchal discomfort. Mid-life onset and bilateral pain are features which tend to distinguish this condition from COMMON MIGRAINE. ANXIETY and DEPRESSION may aggravate this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp182-3)

Headaches, Tension-Vascular
A common condition characterized by recurrent occipital, temporal, or frontal pressure-like HEADACHE associated with nuchal discomfort. Mid-life onset and bilateral pain are features which tend to distinguish this condition from COMMON MIGRAINE. ANXIETY and DEPRESSION may aggravate this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp182-3)

Headaches, Throbbing
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Thunderclap
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Unilateral
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headaches, Vascular
A group of disorders characterized by recurrent headaches associated with abnormal dilation and constriction of cerebral blood vessels. Representative disorders from this category include MIGRAINE; CLUSTER HEADACHE; and paroxysmal hemicrania.

Headaches, Vertex
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headgear, Orthodontic
Extraoral devices for applying force to the dentition in order to avoid some of the problems in anchorage control met with in intermaxillary traction and to apply force in directions not otherwise possible.

Headgears, Orthodontic
Extraoral devices for applying force to the dentition in order to avoid some of the problems in anchorage control met with in intermaxillary traction and to apply force in directions not otherwise possible.

Heading, Subject
Terms or expressions which provide the major means of access by subject to the bibliographic unit.

Headings, Subject
Terms or expressions which provide the major means of access by subject to the bibliographic unit.

Heads, Femur
The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)

Heads, Optic Nerve
The portion of the optic nerve seen in the fundus with the ophthalmoscope. It is formed by the meeting of all the retinal ganglion cell axons as they enter the optic nerve.

Heads, Sperm
The anterior, usually ovoid, nucleus-containing part of spermatozoa.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Headache, Episodic Cluster
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Headaches, Analgesic Rebound
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headaches, Atypical Cluster
A syndrome characterized by daily episodes of intense periorbital pain that recur over a period of 6-12 weeks that may be followed by a period of remission of months to years. The pain is non-throbbing, has a duration of 30-60 minutes and tends to occur at night or at regular intervals during the day. Unilateral rhinorrhea, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, facial flushing, and miosis frequently accompany the headaches, which primarily affect young adult males. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p181)

Headaches, Analgesic Overuse
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Headache, Vascular
A group of disorders characterized by recurrent headaches associated with abnormal dilation and constriction of cerebral blood vessels. Representative disorders from this category include MIGRAINE; CLUSTER HEADACHE; and paroxysmal hemicrania.

Headaches

Headache, Vertex
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Unilateral
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Throbbing
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Thunderclap
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Headache, Tension-Vascular
A common condition characterized by recurrent occipital, temporal, or frontal pressure-like HEADACHE associated with nuchal discomfort. Mid-life onset and bilateral pain are features which tend to distinguish this condition from COMMON MIGRAINE. ANXIETY and DEPRESSION may aggravate this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp182-3)

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