Glioma
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  Glioma



Glioma

   Any tumor arising from glial tissue.

RELATED TERMS
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Tumor
Overgrowth of tissue.

Tissue
Biological tissue is a group of cells that perform a similar function.The study of tissues is known as histology, or, in connection with disease, histopathology.The classical tools for studying the tissues are the wax block, the tissue stain, and the optical microscope, though developments in electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and frozen sections have all added to the sum of knowledge in the last couple of decades.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Glioblastoma
A malignant form of astrocytoma histologically characterized by pleomorphism of cells, nuclear atypia, microhemorrhage, and necrosis. They may arise in any region of the central nervous system, with a predilection for the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, and commissural pathways. Clinical presentation most frequently occurs in the fifth or sixth decade of life with focal neurologic signs or seizures.

Glioblastoma Multiforme
A malignant form of astrocytoma histologically characterized by pleomorphism of cells, nuclear atypia, microhemorrhage, and necrosis. They may arise in any region of the central nervous system, with a predilection for the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, and commissural pathways. Clinical presentation most frequently occurs in the fifth or sixth decade of life with focal neurologic signs or seizures.

Glioblastoma with Sarcomatous Component
Rare mixed tumors of the brain and rarely the spinal cord which contain malignant neuroectodermal (glial) and mesenchymal components, including spindle-shaped fibrosarcoma cells. These tumors are highly aggressive and present primarily in adults as rapidly expanding mass lesions. They may arise in tissue that has been previously irradiated. (From Br J Neurosurg 1995 Apr;9(2):171-8)

Glioblastoma, Giant Cell
A malignant form of astrocytoma histologically characterized by pleomorphism of cells, nuclear atypia, microhemorrhage, and necrosis. They may arise in any region of the central nervous system, with a predilection for the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, and commissural pathways. Clinical presentation most frequently occurs in the fifth or sixth decade of life with focal neurologic signs or seizures.

Glioblastoma, Retinal
A malignant tumor arising from the nuclear layer of the retina that is the most common primary tumor of the eye in children. The tumor tends to occur in early childhood or infancy and may be present at birth. The majority are sporadic, but the condition may be transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Histologic features include dense cellularity, small round polygonal cells, and areas of calcification and necrosis. An abnormal pupil reflex (leukokoria); NYSTAGMUS; STRABISMUS; and visual loss represent common clinical characteristics of this condition. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2104)

Glioblastomas
A malignant form of astrocytoma histologically characterized by pleomorphism of cells, nuclear atypia, microhemorrhage, and necrosis. They may arise in any region of the central nervous system, with a predilection for the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, and commissural pathways. Clinical presentation most frequently occurs in the fifth or sixth decade of life with focal neurologic signs or seizures.

Glioblastomas, Giant Cell
A malignant form of astrocytoma histologically characterized by pleomorphism of cells, nuclear atypia, microhemorrhage, and necrosis. They may arise in any region of the central nervous system, with a predilection for the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, and commissural pathways. Clinical presentation most frequently occurs in the fifth or sixth decade of life with focal neurologic signs or seizures.

Glioblastomas, Retinal
A malignant tumor arising from the nuclear layer of the retina that is the most common primary tumor of the eye in children. The tumor tends to occur in early childhood or infancy and may be present at birth. The majority are sporadic, but the condition may be transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Histologic features include dense cellularity, small round polygonal cells, and areas of calcification and necrosis. An abnormal pupil reflex (leukokoria); NYSTAGMUS; STRABISMUS; and visual loss represent common clinical characteristics of this condition. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2104)

Gliocladium
A mitosporic fungal genus occurring in soil or decaying plant matter. It is structurally similar to Penicillium.

Glioma, Astrocytic
Neoplasms of the brain and spinal cord derived from glial cells which vary from histologically benign forms to highly anaplastic and malignant tumors. Fibrillary astrocytomas are the most common type and may be classified in order of increasing malignancy (grades I through IV). In the first two decades of life, astrocytomas tend to originate in the cerebellar hemispheres; in adults, they most frequently arise in the cerebrum and frequently undergo malignant transformation. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2013-7; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1082)

Glioma, Malignant
Benign and malignant central nervous system neoplasms derived from glial cells (i.e., astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymocytes). Astrocytes may give rise to astrocytomas (ASTROCYTOMA) or glioblastoma multiforme (see GLIOBLASTOMA). Oligodendrocytes give rise to oligodendrogliomas (OLIGODENDROGLIOMA) and ependymocytes may undergo transformation to become ependymomas (EPENDYMOMA), CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS, or colloid cysts of the third ventricle. (From Escourolle et al., Manual of Basic Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p21)

Glioma, Mixed
Benign and malignant central nervous system neoplasms derived from glial cells (i.e., astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymocytes). Astrocytes may give rise to astrocytomas (ASTROCYTOMA) or glioblastoma multiforme (see GLIOBLASTOMA). Oligodendrocytes give rise to oligodendrogliomas (OLIGODENDROGLIOMA) and ependymocytes may undergo transformation to become ependymomas (EPENDYMOMA), CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS, or colloid cysts of the third ventricle. (From Escourolle et al., Manual of Basic Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p21)

Glioma, Optic
Glial cell derived tumors arising from the optic nerve, usually presenting in childhood. Roughly 50% are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1. Clinical manifestations include decreased visual acuity; EXOPHTHALMOS; NYSTAGMUS; STRABISMUS; pallor or swelling of the optic disc; and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION. The tumor may extend into the optic chiasm and hypothalamus. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p681)

Glioma, Optic Nerve
Glial cell derived tumors arising from the optic nerve, usually presenting in childhood. Roughly 50% are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1. Clinical manifestations include decreased visual acuity; EXOPHTHALMOS; NYSTAGMUS; STRABISMUS; pallor or swelling of the optic disc; and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION. The tumor may extend into the optic chiasm and hypothalamus. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p681)

Glioma, Optic Nerve, Adult
Glial cell derived tumors arising from the optic nerve, usually presenting in childhood. Roughly 50% are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1. Clinical manifestations include decreased visual acuity; EXOPHTHALMOS; NYSTAGMUS; STRABISMUS; pallor or swelling of the optic disc; and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION. The tumor may extend into the optic chiasm and hypothalamus. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p681)

Glioma, Optic Nerve, Childhood
Glial cell derived tumors arising from the optic nerve, usually presenting in childhood. Roughly 50% are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1. Clinical manifestations include decreased visual acuity; EXOPHTHALMOS; NYSTAGMUS; STRABISMUS; pallor or swelling of the optic disc; and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION. The tumor may extend into the optic chiasm and hypothalamus. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p681)

Glioma, Retinal
A malignant tumor arising from the nuclear layer of the retina that is the most common primary tumor of the eye in children. The tumor tends to occur in early childhood or infancy and may be present at birth. The majority are sporadic, but the condition may be transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Histologic features include dense cellularity, small round polygonal cells, and areas of calcification and necrosis. An abnormal pupil reflex (leukokoria); NYSTAGMUS; STRABISMUS; and visual loss represent common clinical characteristics of this condition. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2104)

Glioma, Sarcomatous
Rare mixed tumors of the brain and rarely the spinal cord which contain malignant neuroectodermal (glial) and mesenchymal components, including spindle-shaped fibrosarcoma cells. These tumors are highly aggressive and present primarily in adults as rapidly expanding mass lesions. They may arise in tissue that has been previously irradiated. (From Br J Neurosurg 1995 Apr;9(2):171-8)

Glioma, Subependymal
Rare, slow-growing, benign intraventricular tumors, often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally. The tumors are classified histologically as ependymomas and demonstrate a proliferation of subependymal fibrillary astrocytes among the ependymal tumor cells. (From Clin Neurol Neurosurg 1997 Feb;99(1):17-22)

Gliomas
Benign and malignant central nervous system neoplasms derived from glial cells (i.e., astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymocytes). Astrocytes may give rise to astrocytomas (ASTROCYTOMA) or glioblastoma multiforme (see GLIOBLASTOMA). Oligodendrocytes give rise to oligodendrogliomas (OLIGODENDROGLIOMA) and ependymocytes may undergo transformation to become ependymomas (EPENDYMOMA), CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS, or colloid cysts of the third ventricle. (From Escourolle et al., Manual of Basic Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p21)

Gliomas, Astrocytic
Neoplasms of the brain and spinal cord derived from glial cells which vary from histologically benign forms to highly anaplastic and malignant tumors. Fibrillary astrocytomas are the most common type and may be classified in order of increasing malignancy (grades I through IV). In the first two decades of life, astrocytomas tend to originate in the cerebellar hemispheres; in adults, they most frequently arise in the cerebrum and frequently undergo malignant transformation. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2013-7; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1082)

Gliomas, Malignant
Benign and malignant central nervous system neoplasms derived from glial cells (i.e., astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymocytes). Astrocytes may give rise to astrocytomas (ASTROCYTOMA) or glioblastoma multiforme (see GLIOBLASTOMA). Oligodendrocytes give rise to oligodendrogliomas (OLIGODENDROGLIOMA) and ependymocytes may undergo transformation to become ependymomas (EPENDYMOMA), CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS, or colloid cysts of the third ventricle. (From Escourolle et al., Manual of Basic Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p21)

Gliomas, Mixed
Benign and malignant central nervous system neoplasms derived from glial cells (i.e., astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymocytes). Astrocytes may give rise to astrocytomas (ASTROCYTOMA) or glioblastoma multiforme (see GLIOBLASTOMA). Oligodendrocytes give rise to oligodendrogliomas (OLIGODENDROGLIOMA) and ependymocytes may undergo transformation to become ependymomas (EPENDYMOMA), CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS, or colloid cysts of the third ventricle. (From Escourolle et al., Manual of Basic Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p21)

Gliomas, Optic
Glial cell derived tumors arising from the optic nerve, usually presenting in childhood. Roughly 50% are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1. Clinical manifestations include decreased visual acuity; EXOPHTHALMOS; NYSTAGMUS; STRABISMUS; pallor or swelling of the optic disc; and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION. The tumor may extend into the optic chiasm and hypothalamus. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p681)

Gliomas, Optic Nerve
Glial cell derived tumors arising from the optic nerve, usually presenting in childhood. Roughly 50% are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1. Clinical manifestations include decreased visual acuity; EXOPHTHALMOS; NYSTAGMUS; STRABISMUS; pallor or swelling of the optic disc; and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION. The tumor may extend into the optic chiasm and hypothalamus. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p681)

Gliomas, Retinal
A malignant tumor arising from the nuclear layer of the retina that is the most common primary tumor of the eye in children. The tumor tends to occur in early childhood or infancy and may be present at birth. The majority are sporadic, but the condition may be transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Histologic features include dense cellularity, small round polygonal cells, and areas of calcification and necrosis. An abnormal pupil reflex (leukokoria); NYSTAGMUS; STRABISMUS; and visual loss represent common clinical characteristics of this condition. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2104)

Gliomas, Sarcomatous
Rare mixed tumors of the brain and rarely the spinal cord which contain malignant neuroectodermal (glial) and mesenchymal components, including spindle-shaped fibrosarcoma cells. These tumors are highly aggressive and present primarily in adults as rapidly expanding mass lesions. They may arise in tissue that has been previously irradiated. (From Br J Neurosurg 1995 Apr;9(2):171-8)

Gliomas, Subependymal
Rare, slow-growing, benign intraventricular tumors, often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally. The tumors are classified histologically as ependymomas and demonstrate a proliferation of subependymal fibrillary astrocytes among the ependymal tumor cells. (From Clin Neurol Neurosurg 1997 Feb;99(1):17-22)

Gliomatosis Cerebri
Neoplasms composed of neuroepithelial cells, which have the capacity to differentiate into NEURONS, oligodendrocytes, and ASTROCYTES. The majority of craniospinal tumors are of neuroepithelial origin. (From Dev Biol 1998 Aug 1;200(1):1-5)

Gliosarcoma
Rare mixed tumors of the brain and rarely the spinal cord which contain malignant neuroectodermal (glial) and mesenchymal components, including spindle-shaped fibrosarcoma cells. These tumors are highly aggressive and present primarily in adults as rapidly expanding mass lesions. They may arise in tissue that has been previously irradiated. (From Br J Neurosurg 1995 Apr;9(2):171-8)

Gliosarcomas
Rare mixed tumors of the brain and rarely the spinal cord which contain malignant neuroectodermal (glial) and mesenchymal components, including spindle-shaped fibrosarcoma cells. These tumors are highly aggressive and present primarily in adults as rapidly expanding mass lesions. They may arise in tissue that has been previously irradiated. (From Br J Neurosurg 1995 Apr;9(2):171-8)

Glioses
The production of a dense fibrous network of neuroglia; includes astrocytosis, which is a proliferation of astrocytes in the area of a degenerative lesion.

Glioses, Subependymal
Rare, slow-growing, benign intraventricular tumors, often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally. The tumors are classified histologically as ependymomas and demonstrate a proliferation of subependymal fibrillary astrocytes among the ependymal tumor cells. (From Clin Neurol Neurosurg 1997 Feb;99(1):17-22)

Gliosis
The production of a dense fibrous network of neuroglia; includes astrocytosis, which is a proliferation of astrocytes in the area of a degenerative lesion.

Gliosis, Subependymal
Rare, slow-growing, benign intraventricular tumors, often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally. The tumors are classified histologically as ependymomas and demonstrate a proliferation of subependymal fibrillary astrocytes among the ependymal tumor cells. (From Clin Neurol Neurosurg 1997 Feb;99(1):17-22)

Gliostatin
The enzyme catalyzing the transfer of 2-deoxy-D-ribose from thymidine to orthophosphate, thereby liberating thymidine. EC 2.4.2.4.

Gliotoxin
A fungal toxin produced by various species of Trichoderma, Gladiocladium fimbriatum, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Penicillium. It is used as an immunosuppressive agent.

Gliotoxins
A fungal toxin produced by various species of Trichoderma, Gladiocladium fimbriatum, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Penicillium. It is used as an immunosuppressive agent.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Guillain-Barr? syndrome
A rare but reversible reaction to a viral illness or immunization that causes partial to complete loss of movement of certain muscles, weakness, numbness and tingling. In the severe form, a person may need intensive care and breathing support.

Gait
Pattern of walking.

Generic
A drug not protected by a trademark. Also, the scientific name as opposed to the proprietary, brand name.

Genesis
The beginning of a process.

Glia (neuroglia)
Supportive tissue of the brain. There are three types of glial tissue: astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia. Glial cells do not conduct electrical impulses, as opposed to neurons.

Glioma

Glucocorticosteroids
Medications used to decrease swelling around tumors.

Growth factor
A naturally occurring protein chemical that stimulates cell division and proliferation. It is produced by normal cells during embryonic development, tissue growth, and wound healing. Tumors, however, produce large amounts of growth factors.

Generalized vaccinia
Secondary lesions of the skin following vaccination which may occur in subjects with previously healthy skin but are more common in the case of traumatized skin, especially in the case of eczema (eczema vaccinatum). In the latter instance, generalized vaccinia may result from mere contact with a vaccinated person. Secondary vaccinial lesions may also occur following transfer of virus from the vaccination to another site by means of the fingers (autoinnoculation).

Glanders
A chronic debilitating disease of horses and other equids, as well as some members of the cat family, caused by Pseudomonas mallei; it is transmissible to humans. It attacks the mucous membranes of the nostrils of the horse, producing an increased and vitiated secretion and discharge of mucus, and enlargement and induration of the glands of the lower jaw.

Granulocytopenia
Less than the normal number of granular leukocytes in the blood.

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   lioma / gioma / gloma / glima / glioa / gliom / gglioma / gllioma / gliioma / gliooma / gliomma / gliomaa / tlioma / goioma / gpioma / g;ioma / g.ioma / g,ioma / gkioma / giioma / gloma / gli9ma / gli0ma / glipma / glilma / glikma / gliima / gli8ma / gliona / glioja / glioka / glio,a / glio a / gliomq / gliomw / glioms / gliomx / gliomz /