Gastric
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  Gastric



Gastric

    Related to the stomach.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Gasterosteidae
Group of fish under the superorder Acanthopterygii, separate from the PERCIFORMES, which includes swamp eels, mullets, sticklebacks, seahorses, spiny eels, rainbowfishes, and KILLIFISHES. The name is derived from the six taxa which comprise the group. (From http://www.nanfa.org/articles/Elassoma/elassoma.htm, 8/4/2000)

Gasterosteiformes
Group of fish under the superorder Acanthopterygii, separate from the PERCIFORMES, which includes swamp eels, mullets, sticklebacks, seahorses, spiny eels, rainbowfishes, and KILLIFISHES. The name is derived from the six taxa which comprise the group. (From http://www.nanfa.org/articles/Elassoma/elassoma.htm, 8/4/2000)

Gaston Memorial Hospital
The Gaston Memorial Hospital is a hospital in Gastonia, North Carolina, United States.

Gastrectomies
Excision of the whole (total gastrectomy) or part (subtotal gastrectomy, partial gastrectomy, gastric resection) of the stomach. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Gastrectomy
An operation to remove all or part of the stomach.

Gastric Acid
Hydrochloric acid present in GASTRIC JUICE.

Gastric Acidity Determination
Gastric analysis for determination of free acid or total acid.

Gastric Acidity Determinations
Gastric analysis for determination of free acid or total acid.

Gastric Acids
Hydrochloric acid present in GASTRIC JUICE.

Gastric Agents
Drugs used for their effects on the gastrointestinal system, as to control gastric acidity, regulate gastrointestinal motility and water flow, and improve digestion.

Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia
A capillary ectasia of the gastric antrum mucosa characterized by thickened, red vascular folds radiating longitudinally from the pylorus to the antrum and resembling, upon endoscopic examination, the stripes on the skin of a ripened watermelon. Histological characteristics include dilated mucosal capillaries, focal thrombosis, and fibromuscular hypertrophy of the lamina propria. It is a cause of chronic upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

Gastric atrophy
A condition in which the stomach muscles shrink and become weak. It results in a lack of digestive juices. Gastritis: Inflammation of the stomach.

Gastric Balloon
An inflatable device implanted in the stomach as an adjunct to therapy of morbid obesity. Specific types include the silicone Garren-Edwards Gastric Bubble (GEGB), approved by the FDA in 1985, and the Ballobes Balloon.

Gastric Balloons
An inflatable device implanted in the stomach as an adjunct to therapy of morbid obesity. Specific types include the silicone Garren-Edwards Gastric Bubble (GEGB), approved by the FDA in 1985, and the Ballobes Balloon.

Gastric banding
A surgically implanted device used to help a person lose weight. In a surgical procedure, a band is placed around the upper part of the stomach, creating a small pouch that can hold only a small amount of food. The narrowed opening between the stomach pouch and the rest of the stomach controls how quickly food passes from the pouch to the lower part of the stomach. The system helps the patient eat less by limiting the amount of food that can be eaten at one time and increasing the time it takes for food to be digested.

Gastric Bubble
An inflatable device implanted in the stomach as an adjunct to therapy of morbid obesity. Specific types include the silicone Garren-Edwards Gastric Bubble (GEGB), approved by the FDA in 1985, and the Ballobes Balloon.

Gastric Bubble, Garren-Edwards
An inflatable device implanted in the stomach as an adjunct to therapy of morbid obesity. Specific types include the silicone Garren-Edwards Gastric Bubble (GEGB), approved by the FDA in 1985, and the Ballobes Balloon.

Gastric Bubbles
An inflatable device implanted in the stomach as an adjunct to therapy of morbid obesity. Specific types include the silicone Garren-Edwards Gastric Bubble (GEGB), approved by the FDA in 1985, and the Ballobes Balloon.

Gastric Bypass
Surgical procedure in which the stomach is transected high on the body. The resulting proximal remnant is joined to a loop of the jejunum in an end-to-side anastomosis. This procedure is used frequently in the treatment of morbid obesity.

Gastric Bypass, Greenville
Surgical procedure in which the stomach is transected high on the body. The resulting proximal remnant is joined to a loop of the jejunum in an end-to-side anastomosis. This procedure is used frequently in the treatment of morbid obesity.

Gastric Bypasses
Surgical procedure in which the stomach is transected high on the body. The resulting proximal remnant is joined to a loop of the jejunum in an end-to-side anastomosis. This procedure is used frequently in the treatment of morbid obesity.

Gastric cancer
Cancer of the stomach, the major organ that holds food for digestion. Worldwide, stomach cancer is the second most frequent cancer and the second leading cause of death from cancer. It can develop in any part of the stomach and spread to other organs.

Gastric Cancer
Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.

Gastric Cancers
Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.

Gastric Chief Cell
Epithelial cells that line the basal half of the gastric glands. Chief cells synthesize and secrete pepsinogen, a precursor of the enzyme pepsin.

Gastric Chief Cells
Epithelial cells that line the basal half of the gastric glands. Chief cells synthesize and secrete pepsinogen, a precursor of the enzyme pepsin.

Gastric Contents Aspiration
A type of pneumonia resulting from the aspiration of food, liquid, or gastric contents into the upper respiratory tract.

Gastric Contents Aspirations
A type of pneumonia resulting from the aspiration of food, liquid, or gastric contents into the upper respiratory tract.

Gastric Diverticuloses
Saccular, outward protrusion of a portion of the mucous membrane of the stomach wall.

Gastric Diverticulosis
Saccular, outward protrusion of a portion of the mucous membrane of the stomach wall.

Gastric Diverticulum
Saccular, outward protrusion of a portion of the mucous membrane of the stomach wall.

Gastric Drugs
Drugs used for their effects on the gastrointestinal system, as to control gastric acidity, regulate gastrointestinal motility and water flow, and improve digestion.

Gastric Emptying
The evacuation of food from the stomach into the duodenum.

Gastric emptying study
A gastric emptying study evaluates the emptying of food from the stomach. For a gastric emptying study, a patient eats a meal in which the solid food, liquid food or both are mixed with a small amount of radioactive material. A scanner (acting like a Geiger counter) is placed over the stomach to monitor the amount of radioactivity in the stomach for several hours after the test meal. In patients with abnormal emptying of the stomach, the food and radioactive material stay in the stomach longer than normal (usually hours) before emptying into the small intestine.

Gastric Emptyings
The evacuation of food from the stomach into the duodenum.

Gastric Feeding Tube
Nutritional support given via the alimentary canal or any route connected to the gastrointestinal system (i.e., the enteral route). This includes oral feeding, sip feeding, and tube feeding using nasogastric, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tubes.

Gastric Feeding Tubes
Nutritional support given via the alimentary canal or any route connected to the gastrointestinal system (i.e., the enteral route). This includes oral feeding, sip feeding, and tube feeding using nasogastric, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tubes.

Gastric Fistula
Abnormal passage communicating with the stomach.

Gastric Fistulas
Abnormal passage communicating with the stomach.

Gastric Fundus
The superior portion of the body of the stomach above the level of the cardiac notch.

Gastric Gland
Surface epithelium in the stomach that invaginates into the lamina propria, forming gastric pits. Tubular glands, characteristic of each region of the stomach (cardiac, gastric, and pyloric), empty into the gastric pits. The gastric mucosa is made up of several different kinds of cells.

Gastric Glands
Surface epithelium in the stomach that invaginates into the lamina propria, forming gastric pits. Tubular glands, characteristic of each region of the stomach (cardiac, gastric, and pyloric), empty into the gastric pits. The gastric mucosa is made up of several different kinds of cells.

Gastric Hydrochloric Acid
Hydrochloric acid present in GASTRIC JUICE.

Gastric Hydrochloric Acids
Hydrochloric acid present in GASTRIC JUICE.

Gastric Hypothermia
Abnormally low body temperature intentionally induced in warm-blooded animals by artificial means.

Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide
A gastrointestinal hormone consisting of a 43-amino acid polypeptide (molecular weight 5105). It inhibits gastric secretion and motility and stimulates release of insulin.

Gastric juices
Liquids produced in the stomach to help break down food and kill bacteria.

Gastric MALT lymphoma
A low-grade malignant lymphoma of the stomach associated with chronic infection by the bacterium H. pylori. Three-quarters of gastric MALT lymphomas regress after the eradication of H. pylori with antibiotics. The one-quarter that are unresponsive to antibiotics carry a characteristic chromosomal translocation or are at an advanced stage. The translocation is of the t(11;18)(q21;q21) type.

Gastric Mucosa
Surface epithelium in the stomach that invaginates into the lamina propria, forming gastric pits. Tubular glands, characteristic of each region of the stomach (cardiac, gastric, and pyloric), empty into the gastric pits. The gastric mucosa is made up of several different kinds of cells.

Gastric Mucosas
Surface epithelium in the stomach that invaginates into the lamina propria, forming gastric pits. Tubular glands, characteristic of each region of the stomach (cardiac, gastric, and pyloric), empty into the gastric pits. The gastric mucosa is made up of several different kinds of cells.

Gastric Neoplasm
Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.

Gastric Neoplasms
Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.

Gastric outlet
The exit from the stomach through the pyloric channel and duodenum.

Gastric outlet obstruction
Any disease that mechanically impedes gastric emptying, the normal emptying of the stomach. There is obstruction of the channel of the pylorus and duodenum through which the stomach empties. The cause of the obstruction may be a benign or malignant disease. The most common malignancy that produces gastric outflow obstruction is pancreatic cancer. The benign causes of gastric outflow obstruction include pyloric ulcer and gastric polyps in adults, pyloric stenosis and congenital duodenal webs in children, and the ingestion of caustic substances in all age ranges. Gastric outlet obstruction may be abbreviated GOO.

Gastric Outlet Obstruction
The hindering of output from the stomach to the small intestine. The source varies: peptic ulcer, foreign bodies, aging, neoplasms, etc.

Gastric Outlet Obstructions
The hindering of output from the stomach to the small intestine. The source varies: peptic ulcer, foreign bodies, aging, neoplasms, etc.

Gastric Parietal Cell
Cells of the gastric glands which secrete hydrochloric acid and intrinsic factor.

Gastric Parietal Cells
Cells of the gastric glands which secrete hydrochloric acid and intrinsic factor.

Gastric Regurgitation
Reflux of gastric juice and/or duodenal contents (bile acids, pancreatic juice) into the distal esophagus, commonly due to incompetence of the lower esophageal sphincter. Gastric regurgitation is an extension of this process with entry of fluid into the pharynx or mouth.

Gastric Regurgitations
Reflux of gastric juice and/or duodenal contents (bile acids, pancreatic juice) into the distal esophagus, commonly due to incompetence of the lower esophageal sphincter. Gastric regurgitation is an extension of this process with entry of fluid into the pharynx or mouth.

Gastric Remnant
That portion of the stomach remaining after gastric surgery, usually gastrectomy or gastroenterostomy for cancer of the stomach or peptic ulcer. It is a common site of cancer referred to as stump cancer or carcinoma of the gastric stump.

Gastric Remnants
That portion of the stomach remaining after gastric surgery, usually gastrectomy or gastroenterostomy for cancer of the stomach or peptic ulcer. It is a common site of cancer referred to as stump cancer or carcinoma of the gastric stump.

Gastric resection
An operation to remove part or all of the stomach.

Gastric stapling
A surgical procedure that converts the upper part of the stomach into a very small pouch by stapling portions of the stomach together, forcing an obese person to eat only tiny portions yet still feel full. It is normally done only in severe cases, and in combination with diet and exercise. A similar operation is called gastric banding.

Gastric Stases
Paralysis of the muscular coat of the stomach. It is most often seen as a complication of DIABETES MELLITUS. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)

Gastric Stasis
Paralysis of the muscular coat of the stomach. It is most often seen as a complication of DIABETES MELLITUS. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)

Gastric Stump
That portion of the stomach remaining after gastric surgery, usually gastrectomy or gastroenterostomy for cancer of the stomach or peptic ulcer. It is a common site of cancer referred to as stump cancer or carcinoma of the gastric stump.

Gastric Stumps
That portion of the stomach remaining after gastric surgery, usually gastrectomy or gastroenterostomy for cancer of the stomach or peptic ulcer. It is a common site of cancer referred to as stump cancer or carcinoma of the gastric stump.

Gastric ulcer
See stomach ulcer.

Gastric Vagotomies, Proximal
Vagal denervation of that part of the stomach lined with acid secreting mucosa. Since the procedure leaves the vagal branches to the antrum and pylorus intact, it circumvents gastric drainage required with truncal vagotomy techniques.

Gastric Vagotomy, Proximal
Vagal denervation of that part of the stomach lined with acid secreting mucosa. Since the procedure leaves the vagal branches to the antrum and pylorus intact, it circumvents gastric drainage required with truncal vagotomy techniques.

Gastric Varices
Submucosal varices of the lower esophagus or gastric fundus mucosa, frequently caused by the development of portal collateral vessels consequent to portal hypertension.

Gastric Varix
Submucosal varices of the lower esophagus or gastric fundus mucosa, frequently caused by the development of portal collateral vessels consequent to portal hypertension.

Gastric-Inhibitory Polypeptide
A gastrointestinal hormone consisting of a 43-amino acid polypeptide (molecular weight 5105). It inhibits gastric secretion and motility and stimulates release of insulin.

Gastrin
A hormone released after eating, which causes the stomach to produce more acid.

Gastrin Cell
Endocrine cells found in the pyloric gland mucosa (antral mucosa) of the stomach and responsible for the secretion of gastrin.

Gastrin Cells
Endocrine cells found in the pyloric gland mucosa (antral mucosa) of the stomach and responsible for the secretion of gastrin.

Gastrin Pentapeptide
A synthetic pentapeptide that has effects like gastrin when given parenterally. It stimulates the secretion of gastric acid, pepsin, and intrinsic factor, and has been used as a diagnostic aid.

Gastrin Producing Tumor
A gastrin-secreting tumor of the non-beta islet cells. It is usually located in the pancreas but is also found at other sites, as in the antrum of the stomach, hilus of the spleen, and regional lymph nodes. The presence of gastrinoma is one of three requirements to be met for identification of ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME, which sometimes occurs in families with MULTIPLE ENDOCRINE NEOPLASIA TYPE 1; (MEN-1). Gastrinomas in patients with MEN-1 are usually diffuse in nature.

Gastrin Receptor
Cell surface proteins that bind cholecystokinin (CCK) with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Cholecystokinin receptors are activated by gastrin as well as by CCK-4; CCK-8; and CCK-33. Activation of these receptors evokes secretion of amylase by pancreatic acinar cells, acid and pepsin by stomach mucosal cells, and contraction of the pylorus and gall bladder. The role of the widespread CCK receptors in the central nervous system is not well understood.

Gastrin Receptors
Cell surface proteins that bind cholecystokinin (CCK) with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Cholecystokinin receptors are activated by gastrin as well as by CCK-4; CCK-8; and CCK-33. Activation of these receptors evokes secretion of amylase by pancreatic acinar cells, acid and pepsin by stomach mucosal cells, and contraction of the pylorus and gall bladder. The role of the widespread CCK receptors in the central nervous system is not well understood.

Gastrin Releasing Peptide
Neuropeptide and gut hormone that helps regulate GASTRIC ACID secretion and motor function. Once released from nerves in the antrum of the stomach, the neuropeptide stimulates release of gastrin from the G CELLS.

Gastrin Releasing Peptide Receptor
Cell surface proteins that bind bombesin or closely related peptides with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Gastrin- releasing peptide (GRP); GRP 18-27 (neuromedin C), and neuromedin B are endogenous ligands of bombesin receptors in mammals.

Gastrin Releasing Peptide Receptors
Cell surface proteins that bind bombesin or closely related peptides with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Gastrin- releasing peptide (GRP); GRP 18-27 (neuromedin C), and neuromedin B are endogenous ligands of bombesin receptors in mammals.

Gastrin Releasing Peptide, Pig
Neuropeptide and gut hormone that helps regulate GASTRIC ACID secretion and motor function. Once released from nerves in the antrum of the stomach, the neuropeptide stimulates release of gastrin from the G CELLS.

Gastrin Releasing Peptide, Sheep
Neuropeptide and gut hormone that helps regulate GASTRIC ACID secretion and motor function. Once released from nerves in the antrum of the stomach, the neuropeptide stimulates release of gastrin from the G CELLS.

Gastrin Tetrapeptide
L-Tryptophyl-L-methionyl-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalaninamide. The C-terminal tetrapeptide of gastrin. It is the smallest peptide fragment of gastrin which has the same physiological and pharmacological activity as gastrin.

Gastrin-Producing Tumor
A gastrin-secreting tumor of the non-beta islet cells. It is usually located in the pancreas but is also found at other sites, as in the antrum of the stomach, hilus of the spleen, and regional lymph nodes. The presence of gastrinoma is one of three requirements to be met for identification of ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME, which sometimes occurs in families with MULTIPLE ENDOCRINE NEOPLASIA TYPE 1; (MEN-1). Gastrinomas in patients with MEN-1 are usually diffuse in nature.

Gastrin-Producing Tumors
A gastrin-secreting tumor of the non-beta islet cells. It is usually located in the pancreas but is also found at other sites, as in the antrum of the stomach, hilus of the spleen, and regional lymph nodes. The presence of gastrinoma is one of three requirements to be met for identification of ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME, which sometimes occurs in families with MULTIPLE ENDOCRINE NEOPLASIA TYPE 1; (MEN-1). Gastrinomas in patients with MEN-1 are usually diffuse in nature.

Gastrin-Releasing Peptide
Neuropeptide and gut hormone that helps regulate GASTRIC ACID secretion and motor function. Once released from nerves in the antrum of the stomach, the neuropeptide stimulates release of gastrin from the G CELLS.

Gastrin-Releasing Peptide (1-27)
Neuropeptide and gut hormone that helps regulate GASTRIC ACID secretion and motor function. Once released from nerves in the antrum of the stomach, the neuropeptide stimulates release of gastrin from the G CELLS.

Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor
Cell surface proteins that bind bombesin or closely related peptides with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Gastrin- releasing peptide (GRP); GRP 18-27 (neuromedin C), and neuromedin B are endogenous ligands of bombesin receptors in mammals.

Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptors
Cell surface proteins that bind bombesin or closely related peptides with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Gastrin- releasing peptide (GRP); GRP 18-27 (neuromedin C), and neuromedin B are endogenous ligands of bombesin receptors in mammals.

Gastrin-Releasing Peptide, Pig
Neuropeptide and gut hormone that helps regulate GASTRIC ACID secretion and motor function. Once released from nerves in the antrum of the stomach, the neuropeptide stimulates release of gastrin from the G CELLS.

Gastrin-Releasing Peptide, Sheep
Neuropeptide and gut hormone that helps regulate GASTRIC ACID secretion and motor function. Once released from nerves in the antrum of the stomach, the neuropeptide stimulates release of gastrin from the G CELLS.

Gastrinoma
A gastrin-secreting tumor of the non-beta islet cells. It is usually located in the pancreas but is also found at other sites, as in the antrum of the stomach, hilus of the spleen, and regional lymph nodes. The presence of gastrinoma is one of three requirements to be met for identification of ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME, which sometimes occurs in families with MULTIPLE ENDOCRINE NEOPLASIA TYPE 1; (MEN-1). Gastrinomas in patients with MEN-1 are usually diffuse in nature.

Gastrinomas
A gastrin-secreting tumor of the non-beta islet cells. It is usually located in the pancreas but is also found at other sites, as in the antrum of the stomach, hilus of the spleen, and regional lymph nodes. The presence of gastrinoma is one of three requirements to be met for identification of ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME, which sometimes occurs in families with MULTIPLE ENDOCRINE NEOPLASIA TYPE 1; (MEN-1). Gastrinomas in patients with MEN-1 are usually diffuse in nature.

Gastrins
A family of gastrointestinal peptide hormones that excite the secretion of gastric juices. They may also occur in the central nervous system where they are presumed to be neurotransmitters.

Gastritides, Atrophic
Chronic gastritis with mucosal atrophy.

Gastritides, Hypertrophic
Gastritis with hypertrophy of gastric mucosa folds. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss, excessive mucus secretion, and hypoproteinemia.

Gastritis
An inflammation of the stomach lining.

Gastritis, Atrophic
Chronic gastritis with mucosal atrophy.

Gastritis, Hypertrophic
Gastritis with hypertrophy of gastric mucosa folds. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss, excessive mucus secretion, and hypoproteinemia.

Gastro Esophageal Reflux
Reflux of gastric juice and/or duodenal contents (bile acids, pancreatic juice) into the distal esophagus, commonly due to incompetence of the lower esophageal sphincter. Gastric regurgitation is an extension of this process with entry of fluid into the pharynx or mouth.

Gastro-Esophageal Reflux
Reflux of gastric juice and/or duodenal contents (bile acids, pancreatic juice) into the distal esophagus, commonly due to incompetence of the lower esophageal sphincter. Gastric regurgitation is an extension of this process with entry of fluid into the pharynx or mouth.

Gastrocnemius Muscle
Striated muscles having fibers connected at either or both extremities with the bony framework of the body. These are found in appendicular and axial muscles. (From Stedman, 25th ed)

Gastrocoele
The embryo in the early stage following the blastula, characterized by morphogenetic cell movements, cell differentiation, and the formation of the three germ layers.

Gastrocoeles
The embryo in the early stage following the blastula, characterized by morphogenetic cell movements, cell differentiation, and the formation of the three germ layers.

Gastrocolic reflex
Increase of muscle movement in the gastrointestinal tract when food enters an empty stomach which may cause the urge to have a bowel movement right after eating.

Gastrocrom
Gastrocrom is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): cromolyn sodium.

Gastrodiscoides
A family of flukes of the class Trematoda found in the intestinal tract and liver of animals and man. Some of the genera are Homalagaster, Gastrodiscus, Paramphistomum, Watsonius, Nilocotyle, Gigantocotyle, Gastrothylax, Macropotrema, Ceylonocotyle, Zygocotyle, Cotylophoron, and Calicophoron.

Gastroduodenal Ulcer
Ulcer that occurs in those portions of the alimentary tract which come into contact with gastric juice containing pepsin and acid. It occurs when the amount of acid and pepsin is sufficient to overcome the gastric mucosal barrier.

Gastroduodenal Ulcers
Ulcer that occurs in those portions of the alimentary tract which come into contact with gastric juice containing pepsin and acid. It occurs when the amount of acid and pepsin is sufficient to overcome the gastric mucosal barrier.

Gastroenteritides, Swine Transmissible
A condition of chronic gastroenteritis in adult pigs and fatal gastroenteritis in piglets caused by a CORONAVIRUS.

Gastroenteritides, Transmissible Porcine
A condition of chronic gastroenteritis in adult pigs and fatal gastroenteritis in piglets caused by a CORONAVIRUS.

Gastroenteritis
An infection or irritation of the stomach and intestines, which may be caused by bacteria or parasites from spoiled food or unclean water. Other causes include eating food that irritates the stomach lining and emotional upsets such as anger, fear, or stress. Symptoms include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramping. See also infectious diarrhea and travelers' diarrhea.

Gastroenteritis Virus of Swine
A species of CORONAVIRUS causing a fatal disease to pigs under 3 weeks old.

Gastroenteritis Virus, Murine
A species of the CORONAVIRUS genus causing hepatitis in mice. Four strains have been identified as MHV 1, MHV 2, MHV 3, and MHV 4 (also known as MHV-JHM, which is neurotropic and causes disseminated encephalomyelitis with demyelination as well as focal liver necrosis).

Gastroenteritis Virus, Porcine Transmissible
A species of CORONAVIRUS causing a fatal disease to pigs under 3 weeks old.

Gastroenteritis virus, Transmissible
A species of CORONAVIRUS causing a fatal disease to pigs under 3 weeks old.

Gastroenteritis Viruses, Murine
A species of the CORONAVIRUS genus causing hepatitis in mice. Four strains have been identified as MHV 1, MHV 2, MHV 3, and MHV 4 (also known as MHV-JHM, which is neurotropic and causes disseminated encephalomyelitis with demyelination as well as focal liver necrosis).

Gastroenteritis, Swine Transmissible
A condition of chronic gastroenteritis in adult pigs and fatal gastroenteritis in piglets caused by a CORONAVIRUS.

Gastroenteritis, Transmissible Porcine
A condition of chronic gastroenteritis in adult pigs and fatal gastroenteritis in piglets caused by a CORONAVIRUS.

Gastroenteritis, Transmissible, of Swine
A condition of chronic gastroenteritis in adult pigs and fatal gastroenteritis in piglets caused by a CORONAVIRUS.

Gastroenteritis, Transmissible, Porcine
A condition of chronic gastroenteritis in adult pigs and fatal gastroenteritis in piglets caused by a CORONAVIRUS.

Gastroenterologist
A physician who specializes in digestive diseases.

Gastroenterology
The field of medicine concerned with the function and disorders of the digestive system.

Gastroenterostomies
Surgical construction of a channel between the stomach and intestines.

Gastroenterostomy
Surgical construction of a channel between the stomach and intestines.

Gastroepiploic Arteries
Abdominal artery that follows the curvature of the stomach. The right gasteroepiploic artery is frequently used in coronary artery bypass grafting, myocardial revascularization, and other vascular reconstruction.

Gastroepiploic Artery
Abdominal artery that follows the curvature of the stomach. The right gasteroepiploic artery is frequently used in coronary artery bypass grafting, myocardial revascularization, and other vascular reconstruction.

Gastroesophageal
Pertaining to both the stomach and the esophagus, as in the gastroesophageal junction, the place where the esophagus connects to the stomach.

Gastroesophageal junction
The junction between the stomach and the esophagus; the place where the esophagus connects to the stomach.

Gastroesophageal reflux
The return of stomach contents back up into the esophagus This frequently causes heartburn because of irritation of the esophagus by stomach acid.

Gastroesophageal Reflux
Reflux of gastric juice and/or duodenal contents (bile acids, pancreatic juice) into the distal esophagus, commonly due to incompetence of the lower esophageal sphincter. Gastric regurgitation is an extension of this process with entry of fluid into the pharynx or mouth.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
Flow of the stomach's contents back up into the esophagus, which happens when the muscle between the esophagus and the stomach (the lower esophageal sphincter) is weak or relaxes when it shouldn't. May cause esophagitis. Also called esophageal reflux or reflux esophagitis.

Gastrograffin
A versatile x-ray contrast medium for diagnostic radiology. It can be administered by most routes.

Gastrografin
Gastrografin is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): diatrizoate meglumine; diatrizoate sodium.

Gastrographin
A versatile x-ray contrast medium for diagnostic radiology. It can be administered by most routes.

Gastroileal Bypass
Surgical procedure in which the stomach is transected high on the body. The resulting proximal remnant is joined to a loop of the jejunum in an end-to-side anastomosis. This procedure is used frequently in the treatment of morbid obesity.

Gastroileal Bypasses
Surgical procedure in which the stomach is transected high on the body. The resulting proximal remnant is joined to a loop of the jejunum in an end-to-side anastomosis. This procedure is used frequently in the treatment of morbid obesity.

Gastrointestinal
Having to do with the stomach and intestines.

Gastrointestinal Agents
Drugs used for their effects on the gastrointestinal system, as to control gastric acidity, regulate gastrointestinal motility and water flow, and improve digestion.

Gastrointestinal Cancer
Tumors or cancer of the gastrointestinal system.

Gastrointestinal Cancer Antigen
Sialylated Lewis blood group carbohydrate antigen found in many adenocarcinomas of the digestive tract, especially pancreatic tumors.

Gastrointestinal Cancers
Tumors or cancer of the gastrointestinal system.

Gastrointestinal Content
The residue of ingested substances in the gastrointestinal tract. Excludes natural secretions and FECES.

Gastrointestinal Contents
The residue of ingested substances in the gastrointestinal tract. Excludes natural secretions and FECES.

Gastrointestinal Drugs
Drugs used for their effects on the gastrointestinal system, as to control gastric acidity, regulate gastrointestinal motility and water flow, and improve digestion.

Gastrointestinal Endocrine Cell
Cells found throughout the lining of the gastrointestinal tract that contain regulatory peptide hormones and/or biogenic amines. The substances are located in secretory granules and act in an endocrine or paracrine manner. Some of these substances are also found in neurons in the gut. There are at least 15 different types of endocrine cells of the gut. Some take up amine precursors and have been called APUD CELLS. However, most endocrine cells of the gut apparently have endodermal rather than neuroectodermal origin, so the relationship with APUD cells is not clear.

Gastrointestinal Endocrine Cells
Cells found throughout the lining of the gastrointestinal tract that contain regulatory peptide hormones and/or biogenic amines. The substances are located in secretory granules and act in an endocrine or paracrine manner. Some of these substances are also found in neurons in the gut. There are at least 15 different types of endocrine cells of the gut. Some take up amine precursors and have been called APUD CELLS. However, most endocrine cells of the gut apparently have endodermal rather than neuroectodermal origin, so the relationship with APUD cells is not clear.

Gastrointestinal Endoscope
Instruments for the visual examination of the interior of the gastrointestinal tract.

Gastrointestinal Endoscopes
Instruments for the visual examination of the interior of the gastrointestinal tract.

Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgical Procedures
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.

Gastrointestinal Endoscopies
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.

Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.

Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage
Bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract.

Gastrointestinal Hemorrhages
Bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract.

Gastrointestinal Hormone Receptor
Cell surface proteins that bind gastrointestinal hormones with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Most gastrointestinal hormones also act as neurotransmitters so these receptors are also present in the central and peripheral nervous systems.

Gastrointestinal Hormone Receptors
Cell surface proteins that bind gastrointestinal hormones with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Most gastrointestinal hormones also act as neurotransmitters so these receptors are also present in the central and peripheral nervous systems.

Gastrointestinal Hormones
HORMONES secreted by the gastrointestinal mucosa that affect the timing or the quality of secretion of digestive enzymes, and regulate the motor activity of the digestive system organs.

Gastrointestinal Hormones Receptors
Cell surface proteins that bind gastrointestinal hormones with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Most gastrointestinal hormones also act as neurotransmitters so these receptors are also present in the central and peripheral nervous systems.

Gastrointestinal Intubation
The insertion of a tube into the stomach, intestines, or other portion of the gastrointestinal tract to allow for the passage of food products, etc.

Gastrointestinal Intubations
The insertion of a tube into the stomach, intestines, or other portion of the gastrointestinal tract to allow for the passage of food products, etc.

Gastrointestinal Neoplasm
Tumors or cancer of the gastrointestinal system.

Gastrointestinal Neoplasms
Tumors or cancer of the gastrointestinal system.

Gastrointestinal Peptides Receptors
Cell surface proteins that bind gastrointestinal hormones with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Most gastrointestinal hormones also act as neurotransmitters so these receptors are also present in the central and peripheral nervous systems.

Gastrointestinal stromal tumor
GIST. A type of tumor that usually begins in cells in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. It can be benign or malignant. Malignant GISTs can occur from the esophagus to the rectum, but occur most commonly in the stomach and small intestine. Treatment for GIST includes STI571 (Gleevec), the first approved drug to directly turn off the signal of a protein known to cause a cancer.

Gastrointestinal Surgeries, Endoscopic
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.

Gastrointestinal Surgery, Endoscopic
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.

Gastrointestinal Surgical Procedure
Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.

Gastrointestinal Surgical Procedures
Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.

Gastrointestinal System Cancer
Tumors or cancer of the gastrointestinal system.

Gastrointestinal System Cancers
Tumors or cancer of the gastrointestinal system.

Gastrointestinal tract
The tube that extends from the mouth to the anus in which the movement of muscles and release of hormones and enzymes digest food. The gastrointestinal tract starts with the mouth and proceeds to the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, small intestine, large intestine (colon), rectum and, finally, the anus. Also called the alimentary canal, digestive tract and, perhaps most often in conversation, the GI tract.

Gastrointestinal tract (GIT)
The large, muscular tube that extends from the mouth to the anus, where the movement of muscles and release of hormones and enzymes digest food. Also called the alimentary canal or digestive tract.

Gastrointestinal Transit
Passage of food (sometimes in the form of a test meal) through the gastrointestinal tract as measured in minutes or hours. The rate of passage through the intestine is an indicator of small bowel function.

Gastrointestinal Transits
Passage of food (sometimes in the form of a test meal) through the gastrointestinal tract as measured in minutes or hours. The rate of passage through the intestine is an indicator of small bowel function.

Gastrointestinal Tuberculoses
Gastric and/or enteric tuberculosis. This condition is marked by spreading ulcers and diarrhea.

Gastrointestinal Tuberculosis
Gastric and/or enteric tuberculosis. This condition is marked by spreading ulcers and diarrhea.

Gastromark
Gastromark is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): ferumoxsil.

Gastromiro
A non-ionic, water-soluble contrast agent which is used in myelography, arthrography, nephroangiography, arteriography, and other radiological procedures.

Gastropareses
Paralysis of the muscular coat of the stomach. It is most often seen as a complication of DIABETES MELLITUS. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)

Gastroparesis
Nerve or muscle damage in the stomach. Causes slow digestion and emptying, vomiting, nausea, or bloating. Also called delayed gastric emptying.

Gastropathy
Disease of the stomach, as in hypoproteinemic hypertrophic gastropathy.

Gastroplasties
Surgical treatment of the stomach or lower esophagus used to decrease the size of the stomach. The procedure is used mainly in the treatment of morbid obesity and to correct defects in the lower esophagus or the stomach. Different procedures employed include vertical (mesh) banded gastroplasty, silicone elastomer ring vertical gastroplasty and horizontal banded gastroplasty.

Gastroplasty
Surgical treatment of the stomach or lower esophagus used to decrease the size of the stomach. The procedure is used mainly in the treatment of morbid obesity and to correct defects in the lower esophagus or the stomach. Different procedures employed include vertical (mesh) banded gastroplasty, silicone elastomer ring vertical gastroplasty and horizontal banded gastroplasty.

Gastroplasty, Collis
Surgical treatment of the stomach or lower esophagus used to decrease the size of the stomach. The procedure is used mainly in the treatment of morbid obesity and to correct defects in the lower esophagus or the stomach. Different procedures employed include vertical (mesh) banded gastroplasty, silicone elastomer ring vertical gastroplasty and horizontal banded gastroplasty.

Gastroschises
A congenital fissure of the abdominal wall not involving the site of insertion of the umbilical cord, and usually accompanied by protrusion of the small and part of the large intestine. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Gastroschisis
A birth defect in which there is a separation in the abdominal wall. Through this opening protrudes part of the intestines which are not covered by peritoneum (the membrane that normally lines the inside of the abdomen). The opening in the abdominal wall in gastroschisis is never at the site of the umbilicus (the navel or belly button). Rather, the umbilicus is characteristically to the left of the gastroschisis and is separated from it by a bridge of skin.

Gastroscope
A flexible, lighted instrument that is put through the mouth and down the esophagus to view the stomach. Tissue from the stomach can also be removed through the gastroscope.

Gastroscopes
Endoscopes used for examining the interior of the stomach.

Gastroscopic Surgeries
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.

Gastroscopic Surgery
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.

Gastroscopic Surgical Procedure
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.

Gastroscopic Surgical Procedures
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.

Gastroscopies
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.

Gastroscopy
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.

Gastrospirillum
A genus of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria that is pathogenic and has been isolated from the gastric mucosa of mammals, including humans.

Gastrospirillum hominis
A species of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria found in the gastric mucosa that is associated with chronic antral gastritis. This bacterium was first discovered in samples removed at endoscopy from patients investigated for HELICOBACTER PYLORI colonization.

Gastrospirillum suis
A species of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria found in the gastric mucosa that is associated with chronic antral gastritis. This bacterium was first discovered in samples removed at endoscopy from patients investigated for HELICOBACTER PYLORI colonization.

Gastrostomies
Creation of an artificial external opening into the stomach for nutritional support or gastrointestinal compression.

Gastrostomy
An artificial opening from the stomach to a hole (stoma) in the abdomen where a feeding tube is inserted. See also enteral nutrition.

Gastrostomy, percutaneous endoscopic (PEG)
A surgical procedure for placing a feeding tube without having to perform an open laparotomy (operation on the abdomen). The aim of PEG is to feed those who cannot swallow. PEG may be done by a surgeon, otolaryngologist (ENT specialist) or gastroenterologist (GI specialist). It is done in a. hospital or outpatient surgical facility. Local anesthesia (usually lidocaine or another spray) is used to anesthetize the throat. An endoscope (a flexible, lighted instrument) is passed through the mouth, throat and esophagus to the stomach. The surgeon then makes a small incision (cut) in the skin of the abdomen and pushes an intravenous cannula (an IV tube) through the skin into the stomach and sutures (ties) it in place. The patient can usually go home the same day or the next morning. Possible complications include wound infection (as in any kind of surgery) and dislodging or malfunction of the tube. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy may be a mouthful (as a term) but it describes the procedure accurately. A gastrostomy (a surgical opening into the stomach) is made percutaneously (through the skin) using an endoscope to put the feeding tube in place. PEG takes less time, carries less risk and costs less than a classic surgical gastrostomy which requires opening the abdomen.

Gastrotrast
Radiopaque medium usually in oil; used in bronchography.

Gastrotsepin
An antimuscarinic agent that inhibits gastric secretion at lower doses than are required to affect gastrointestinal motility, salivary, central nervous system, cardiovascular, ocular, and urinary function. It promotes the healing of duodenal ulcers and due to its cytoprotective action is beneficial in the prevention of duodenal ulcer recurrence. It also potentiates the effect of other antiulcer agents such as CIMETIDINE and RANITIDINE. It is generally well tolerated by patients.

Gastrovist
Gastrovist is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): diatrizoate meglumine; diatrizoate sodium.

Gastrozepin
An antimuscarinic agent that inhibits gastric secretion at lower doses than are required to affect gastrointestinal motility, salivary, central nervous system, cardiovascular, ocular, and urinary function. It promotes the healing of duodenal ulcers and due to its cytoprotective action is beneficial in the prevention of duodenal ulcer recurrence. It also potentiates the effect of other antiulcer agents such as CIMETIDINE and RANITIDINE. It is generally well tolerated by patients.

Gastrula
The embryo in the early stage following the blastula, characterized by morphogenetic cell movements, cell differentiation, and the formation of the three germ layers.

Gastrulas
The embryo in the early stage following the blastula, characterized by morphogenetic cell movements, cell differentiation, and the formation of the three germ layers.



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Gamma-knife
The gamma knife is used in the treatment of lesions in the brain by a noninvasive surgical technique called stereotaxic radiosurgery. It is a safe, precise, bloodless procedure. The gamma knife uses 201 beams of highly focused gamma rays. The beams are precisely aimed so as to treat only the target (tumor, trigeminal nerve, etc.) with minimal risk to adjacent brain structures.

Gganglion cysts
Non-cancerous, fluid-filled cysts are common masses or lumps in the hand and usually found on the back of the wrist.

Gardner's syndrome
A condition in which many polyps form throughout the digestive tract. Because these polyps are likely to cause cancer, the colon and rectum are often removed to prevent colorectal cancer.

Gas
Air that comes from normal breakdown of food which is passed out of the body through the rectum (flatus) or the mouth (burp).

Gastrectomy
An operation to remove all or part of the stomach.

Gastric

Gastric juices
Liquids produced in the stomach to help break down food and kill bacteria.

Gastric resection
An operation to remove part or all of the stomach.

Gastric ulcer
See stomach ulcer.

Gastrin
A hormone released after eating, which causes the stomach to produce more acid.

Gastritis
An inflammation of the stomach lining.

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