Gangrene
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  Gangrene



Gangrene

   The decay of body tissue in a part of the body where the blood supply is obstructed by injury or disease.

RELATED TERMS
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Decay
Destruction of tooth structure caused by toxins produced by bacteria.

Tissue
Biological tissue is a group of cells that perform a similar function.The study of tissues is known as histology, or, in connection with disease, histopathology.The classical tools for studying the tissues are the wax block, the tissue stain, and the optical microscope, though developments in electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and frozen sections have all added to the sum of knowledge in the last couple of decades.

Blood
The life-maintaining fluid which is made up of plasma, red blood cells (erythrocytes), white blood cells (leukocytes), and platelets; blood circulates through the body's heart, arteries, veins, and capillaries; it carries away waste matter and carbon dioxide, and brings nourishment, electrolytes, hormones, vitamins, antibodies, heat, and oxygen to the tissues.

Injury
Injury is damage or harm caused to the structure or function of the body caused by an outside agent or force, which may be physical or chemical.

Disease
Illness or sickness often characterized by typical patient problems (symptoms) and physical findings (signs). Disruption sequence: The events that occur when a fetus that is developing normally is subjected to a destructive agent such as the rubella (German measles) virus.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Ganga Ram Hospital
The Ganga Ram Hospital is a hospital in Rajendar Nagar, Delhi, India.

Ganganagar doctors
All doctors near Ganganagar, India. Doctors who can assist a patient in Ganganagar.

Ganglia
Clusters of cell bodies of neurons outside of the central nervous system.

Ganglia, Autonomic
Clusters of neurons and their processes in the autonomic nervous system. In the autonomic ganglia, the preganglionic fibers from the central nervous system synapse onto the neurons whose axons are the postganglionic fibers innervating target organs. The ganglia also contain intrinsic neurons and supporting cells and preganglionic fibers passing through to other ganglia.

Ganglia, basal
A region located at the base of the brain composed of 4 clusters of neurons, or nerve cells. This area of the brain is responsible for body movement and coordination.

Ganglia, Basal
Large subcortical nuclear masses derived from the telencephalon and located in the basal regions of the cerebral hemispheres.

Ganglia, Celiac
Ganglia of the sympathetic nervous system including the paravertebral and the prevertebral ganglia. Among these are the sympathetic chain ganglia, the superior, middle, and inferior cervical ganglia, and the aorticorenal, celiac, and stellate ganglia.

Ganglia, Cervicothoracic
A paravertebral sympathetic ganglion formed by the fusion of the inferior cervical and first thoracic ganglia.

Ganglia, Dorsal Root
Sensory ganglia located on the dorsal spinal roots within the vertebral column. The spinal ganglion cells are pseudounipolar. The single primary branch bifurcates sending a peripheral process to carry sensory information from the periphery and a central branch which relays that information to the spinal cord or brain.

Ganglia, Geniculate
The sensory ganglion of the facial (7th cranial) nerve. The geniculate ganglion cells send central processes to the brain stem and peripheral processes to the taste buds in the anterior tongue, the soft palate, and the skin of the external auditory meatus and the mastoid process.

Ganglia, Intra Osseous
Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.

Ganglia, Intra-Osseous
Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.

Ganglia, Intraosseous
Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.

Ganglia, Invertebrate
Clusters of neuronal cell bodies in invertebrates. Invertebrate ganglia may also contain neuronal processes and non-neuronal supporting cells. Many invertebrate ganglia are favorable subjects for research because they have small numbers of functional neuronal types which can be identified from one animal to another.

Ganglia, Nodose
The inferior (caudal) ganglion of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. The unipolar nodose ganglion cells are sensory cells with central projections to the medulla and peripheral processes traveling in various branches of the vagus nerve.

Ganglia, Parasympathetic
Ganglia of the parasympathetic nervous system, including the ciliary, pterygopalatine, submandibular, and otic ganglia in the cranial region and intrinsic (terminal) ganglia associated with target organs in the thorax and abdomen.

Ganglia, Sensory
Clusters of neurons in the somatic peripheral nervous system which contain the cell bodies of sensory nerve axons. Sensory ganglia may also have intrinsic interneurons and non-neuronal supporting cells.

Ganglia, Spinal
Sensory ganglia located on the dorsal spinal roots within the vertebral column. The spinal ganglion cells are pseudounipolar. The single primary branch bifurcates sending a peripheral process to carry sensory information from the periphery and a central branch which relays that information to the spinal cord or brain.

Ganglia, Spiral
The sensory ganglion of the COCHLEAR NERVE. The cells of the spiral ganglion send fibers peripherally to the cochlear hair cells and centrally to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS) of the BRAIN STEM.

Ganglia, Stellate
A paravertebral sympathetic ganglion formed by the fusion of the inferior cervical and first thoracic ganglia.

Ganglia, Superior Cervical
The largest and uppermost of the paravertebral sympathetic ganglia.

Ganglia, Sympathetic
Ganglia of the sympathetic nervous system including the paravertebral and the prevertebral ganglia. Among these are the sympathetic chain ganglia, the superior, middle, and inferior cervical ganglia, and the aorticorenal, celiac, and stellate ganglia.

Ganglia, Trigeminal
The semilunar-shaped ganglion containing the cells of origin of most of the sensory fibers of the trigeminal nerve. It is situated within the dural cleft on the cerebral surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone and gives off the ophthalmic, maxillary, and part of the mandibular nerves.

Ganglias
Clusters of multipolar neurons surrounded by a capsule of loosely organized CONNECTIVE TISSUE located outside the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.

Ganglias, Intra-Osseous
Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.

Ganglias, Intraosseous
Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.

Ganglias, Invertebrate
Clusters of neuronal cell bodies in invertebrates. Invertebrate ganglia may also contain neuronal processes and non-neuronal supporting cells. Many invertebrate ganglia are favorable subjects for research because they have small numbers of functional neuronal types which can be identified from one animal to another.

Ganglias, Stellate
A paravertebral sympathetic ganglion formed by the fusion of the inferior cervical and first thoracic ganglia.

Gangliocytic Paraganglioma
A neural crest tumor usually derived from the chromoreceptor tissue of a paraganglion, such as the carotid body, or medulla of the adrenal gland (usually called a chromaffinoma or pheochromocytoma). It is more common in women than in men. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)

Gangliocytic Paragangliomas
A neural crest tumor usually derived from the chromoreceptor tissue of a paraganglion, such as the carotid body, or medulla of the adrenal gland (usually called a chromaffinoma or pheochromocytoma). It is more common in women than in men. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)

Gangliocytoma
A benign neoplasm that usually arises from the sympathetic trunk in the mediastinum. Histologic features include spindle cell proliferation (resembling a neurofibroma) and the presence of large ganglion cells. The tumor may present clinically with HORNER SYNDROME or diarrhea due to ectopic production of vasoactive intestinal peptide. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p966)

Gangliocytomas
A benign neoplasm that usually arises from the sympathetic trunk in the mediastinum. Histologic features include spindle cell proliferation (resembling a neurofibroma) and the presence of large ganglion cells. The tumor may present clinically with HORNER SYNDROME or diarrhea due to ectopic production of vasoactive intestinal peptide. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p966)

Ganglioglioma
Rare indolent tumors comprised of neoplastic glial and neuronal cells which occur primarily in children and young adults. Benign lesions tend to be associated with long survival unless the tumor degenerates into a histologically malignant form. They tend to occur in the optic nerve and white matter of the brain and spinal cord.

Ganglioglioma, Benign
Rare indolent tumors comprised of neoplastic glial and neuronal cells which occur primarily in children and young adults. Benign lesions tend to be associated with long survival unless the tumor degenerates into a histologically malignant form. They tend to occur in the optic nerve and white matter of the brain and spinal cord.

Ganglioglioma, Intracranial
Rare indolent tumors comprised of neoplastic glial and neuronal cells which occur primarily in children and young adults. Benign lesions tend to be associated with long survival unless the tumor degenerates into a histologically malignant form. They tend to occur in the optic nerve and white matter of the brain and spinal cord.

Ganglioglioma, Malignant
Rare indolent tumors comprised of neoplastic glial and neuronal cells which occur primarily in children and young adults. Benign lesions tend to be associated with long survival unless the tumor degenerates into a histologically malignant form. They tend to occur in the optic nerve and white matter of the brain and spinal cord.

Gangliogliomas
Rare indolent tumors comprised of neoplastic glial and neuronal cells which occur primarily in children and young adults. Benign lesions tend to be associated with long survival unless the tumor degenerates into a histologically malignant form. They tend to occur in the optic nerve and white matter of the brain and spinal cord.

Gangliogliomas, Benign
Rare indolent tumors comprised of neoplastic glial and neuronal cells which occur primarily in children and young adults. Benign lesions tend to be associated with long survival unless the tumor degenerates into a histologically malignant form. They tend to occur in the optic nerve and white matter of the brain and spinal cord.

Gangliogliomas, Intracranial
Rare indolent tumors comprised of neoplastic glial and neuronal cells which occur primarily in children and young adults. Benign lesions tend to be associated with long survival unless the tumor degenerates into a histologically malignant form. They tend to occur in the optic nerve and white matter of the brain and spinal cord.

Gangliogliomas, Malignant
Rare indolent tumors comprised of neoplastic glial and neuronal cells which occur primarily in children and young adults. Benign lesions tend to be associated with long survival unless the tumor degenerates into a histologically malignant form. They tend to occur in the optic nerve and white matter of the brain and spinal cord.

Ganglion
A cluster of nerve cells.

Ganglion cell
Output neuron of the retina. Axons form the optic nerve. Divided into several different classifications by morphological and physiological features for cats and primates.

Ganglion Cell, Retinal
Cells of the innermost nuclear layer of the retina, the ganglion cell layer, which project axons through the optic nerve to the brain. They are quite variable in size and in the shapes of their dendritic arbors, which are generally confined to the inner plexiform layer.

Ganglion Cells, Retinal
Cells of the innermost nuclear layer of the retina, the ganglion cell layer, which project axons through the optic nerve to the brain. They are quite variable in size and in the shapes of their dendritic arbors, which are generally confined to the inner plexiform layer.

Ganglion cyst
A benign, knot-like, cystic tumor on a tendon sheath.

Ganglion of Corti
The sensory ganglion of the COCHLEAR NERVE. The cells of the spiral ganglion send fibers peripherally to the cochlear hair cells and centrally to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS) of the BRAIN STEM.

Ganglion, Autonomic
Clusters of neurons and their processes in the autonomic nervous system. In the autonomic ganglia, the preganglionic fibers from the central nervous system synapse onto the neurons whose axons are the postganglionic fibers innervating target organs. The ganglia also contain intrinsic neurons and supporting cells and preganglionic fibers passing through to other ganglia.

Ganglion, Basal
Large subcortical nuclear masses derived from the telencephalon and located in the basal regions of the cerebral hemispheres.

Ganglion, Celiac
Ganglia of the sympathetic nervous system including the paravertebral and the prevertebral ganglia. Among these are the sympathetic chain ganglia, the superior, middle, and inferior cervical ganglia, and the aorticorenal, celiac, and stellate ganglia.

Ganglion, Cervicothoracic
A paravertebral sympathetic ganglion formed by the fusion of the inferior cervical and first thoracic ganglia.

Ganglion, Dorsal Root
Sensory ganglia located on the dorsal spinal roots within the vertebral column. The spinal ganglion cells are pseudounipolar. The single primary branch bifurcates sending a peripheral process to carry sensory information from the periphery and a central branch which relays that information to the spinal cord or brain.

Ganglion, Gasserian
The semilunar-shaped ganglion containing the cells of origin of most of the sensory fibers of the trigeminal nerve. It is situated within the dural cleft on the cerebral surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone and gives off the ophthalmic, maxillary, and part of the mandibular nerves.

Ganglion, Geniculate
The sensory ganglion of the facial (7th cranial) nerve. The geniculate ganglion cells send central processes to the brain stem and peripheral processes to the taste buds in the anterior tongue, the soft palate, and the skin of the external auditory meatus and the mastoid process.

Ganglion, Intra Osseous
Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.

Ganglion, Intra-Osseous
Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.

Ganglion, Intraosseous
Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.

Ganglion, Invertebrate
Clusters of neuronal cell bodies in invertebrates. Invertebrate ganglia may also contain neuronal processes and non-neuronal supporting cells. Many invertebrate ganglia are favorable subjects for research because they have small numbers of functional neuronal types which can be identified from one animal to another.

Ganglion, Nodose
The inferior (caudal) ganglion of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. The unipolar nodose ganglion cells are sensory cells with central projections to the medulla and peripheral processes traveling in various branches of the vagus nerve.

Ganglion, Parasympathetic
Ganglia of the parasympathetic nervous system, including the ciliary, pterygopalatine, submandibular, and otic ganglia in the cranial region and intrinsic (terminal) ganglia associated with target organs in the thorax and abdomen.

Ganglion, Semilunar
The semilunar-shaped ganglion containing the cells of origin of most of the sensory fibers of the trigeminal nerve. It is situated within the dural cleft on the cerebral surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone and gives off the ophthalmic, maxillary, and part of the mandibular nerves.

Ganglion, Sensory
Clusters of neurons in the somatic peripheral nervous system which contain the cell bodies of sensory nerve axons. Sensory ganglia may also have intrinsic interneurons and non-neuronal supporting cells.

Ganglion, Spinal
Sensory ganglia located on the dorsal spinal roots within the vertebral column. The spinal ganglion cells are pseudounipolar. The single primary branch bifurcates sending a peripheral process to carry sensory information from the periphery and a central branch which relays that information to the spinal cord or brain.

Ganglion, Spiral
The sensory ganglion of the COCHLEAR NERVE. The cells of the spiral ganglion send fibers peripherally to the cochlear hair cells and centrally to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS) of the BRAIN STEM.

Ganglion, Stellate
A paravertebral sympathetic ganglion formed by the fusion of the inferior cervical and first thoracic ganglia.

Ganglion, Superior Cervical
The largest and uppermost of the paravertebral sympathetic ganglia.

Ganglion, Sympathetic
Ganglia of the sympathetic nervous system including the paravertebral and the prevertebral ganglia. Among these are the sympathetic chain ganglia, the superior, middle, and inferior cervical ganglia, and the aorticorenal, celiac, and stellate ganglia.

Ganglion, Trigeminal
The semilunar-shaped ganglion containing the cells of origin of most of the sensory fibers of the trigeminal nerve. It is situated within the dural cleft on the cerebral surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone and gives off the ophthalmic, maxillary, and part of the mandibular nerves.

Ganglionectomies
Removal of an autonomic or sensory ganglion by any means.

Ganglionectomy
Removal of an autonomic or sensory ganglion by any means.

Ganglioneuroblastoma
A moderately malignant neoplasm composed of primitive neuroectodermal cells dispersed in myxomatous or fibrous stroma intermixed with mature ganglion cells. It may undergo transformation into a neuroblastoma. It arises from the sympathetic trunk or less frequently from the adrenal medulla, cerebral cortex, and other locations. Cervical ganglioneuroblastomas may be associated with HORNER SYNDROME and the tumor may occasionally secrete vasoactive intestinal peptide, resulting in chronic diarrhea.

Ganglioneuroblastomas
A moderately malignant neoplasm composed of primitive neuroectodermal cells dispersed in myxomatous or fibrous stroma intermixed with mature ganglion cells. It may undergo transformation into a neuroblastoma. It arises from the sympathetic trunk or less frequently from the adrenal medulla, cerebral cortex, and other locations. Cervical ganglioneuroblastomas may be associated with HORNER SYNDROME and the tumor may occasionally secrete vasoactive intestinal peptide, resulting in chronic diarrhea.

Ganglioneuroma
A benign neoplasm that usually arises from the sympathetic trunk in the mediastinum. Histologic features include spindle cell proliferation (resembling a neurofibroma) and the presence of large ganglion cells. The tumor may present clinically with HORNER SYNDROME or diarrhea due to ectopic production of vasoactive intestinal peptide. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p966)

Ganglioneuromas
A benign neoplasm that usually arises from the sympathetic trunk in the mediastinum. Histologic features include spindle cell proliferation (resembling a neurofibroma) and the presence of large ganglion cells. The tumor may present clinically with HORNER SYNDROME or diarrhea due to ectopic production of vasoactive intestinal peptide. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p966)

Ganglionic Blockaders
Agents having as their major action the interruption of neural transmission at nicotinic receptors on postganglionic autonomic neurons. Because their actions are so broad, including blocking of sympathetic and parasympathetic systems, their therapeutic use has been largely supplanted by more specific drugs. They may still be used in the control of blood pressure in patients with acute dissecting aortic aneurysm and for the induction of hypotension in surgery.

Ganglionic Blockers
Agents having as their major action the interruption of neural transmission at nicotinic receptors on postganglionic autonomic neurons. Because their actions are so broad, including blocking of sympathetic and parasympathetic systems, their therapeutic use has been largely supplanted by more specific drugs. They may still be used in the control of blood pressure in patients with acute dissecting aortic aneurysm and for the induction of hypotension in surgery.

Ganglionic Blocking Agents
Agents having as their major action the interruption of neural transmission at nicotinic receptors on postganglionic autonomic neurons. Because their actions are so broad, including blocking of sympathetic and parasympathetic systems, their therapeutic use has been largely supplanted by more specific drugs. They may still be used in the control of blood pressure in patients with acute dissecting aortic aneurysm and for the induction of hypotension in surgery.

Ganglionic Stimulants
Agents that mimic neural transmission by stimulation of the nicotinic receptors on postganglionic autonomic neurons. Drugs that indirectly augment ganglionic transmission by increasing the release or slowing the breakdown of acetylcholine or by non-nicotinic effects on postganglionic neurons are not included here nor are the nonspecific cholinergic agonists.

Ganglionitides, Geniculate
Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.

Ganglionitis, Geniculate
Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.

Ganglionitis, Herpetic Geniculate
A syndrome characterized by facial palsy in association with a herpetic eruption of the external auditory meatus. This may occasionally be associated with tinnitus, vertigo, deafness, severe otalgia, and inflammation of the pinna. The condition is caused by reactivation of a latent HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN infection which causes inflammation of the facial and vestibular nerves, and may occasionally involve additional cranial nerves. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p757)

Ganglions, Intra-Osseous
Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.

Ganglions, Invertebrate
Clusters of neuronal cell bodies in invertebrates. Invertebrate ganglia may also contain neuronal processes and non-neuronal supporting cells. Many invertebrate ganglia are favorable subjects for research because they have small numbers of functional neuronal types which can be identified from one animal to another.

Ganglioplegic Agents
Agents having as their major action the interruption of neural transmission at nicotinic receptors on postganglionic autonomic neurons. Because their actions are so broad, including blocking of sympathetic and parasympathetic systems, their therapeutic use has been largely supplanted by more specific drugs. They may still be used in the control of blood pressure in patients with acute dissecting aortic aneurysm and for the induction of hypotension in surgery.

Ganglioside GM2
A glycosphingolipid that accumulates due to a deficiency of hexosaminidase A or B (BETA-N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE), or GM2 activator protein, resulting in GANGLIOSIDOSES, heredity metabolic disorders that include TAY-SACHS DISEASE and SANDHOFF DISEASE.

Ganglioside GM3
A ganglioside present in abnormally large amounts in the brain and liver due to a deficient biosynthetic enzyme, G(M3):UDP-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase. Deficiency of this enzyme prevents the formation of G(M2) ganglioside from G(M3) ganglioside and is the cause of an anabolic sphingolipidosis.

Ganglioside Sialidase Deficiency Disease
A group of inherited metabolic diseases characterized by the accumulation of excessive amounts of acid mucopolysaccharides, sphingolipids, and/or glycolipids in visceral and mesenchymal cells. Abnormal amounts of sphingolipids or glycolipids are present in neural tissue. Mental retardation and skeletal changes, most notably dysostosis multiplex, occur frequently. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch56, pp36-7)

Ganglioside Storage Disease
A group of often fatal inherited diseases marked by the accumulation of GANGLIOSIDES in LYSOSOMES secondary to enzymatic deficiency states. Gangliosidoses include TAY- SACHS DISEASE; GANGLIOSIDOSIS GM1; GANGLIOSIDOSES GM2; and SANDHOFF DISEASE; which share the infantile or childhood onset of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM deterioration. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp89-97)

Ganglioside Storage Diseases
A group of often fatal inherited diseases marked by the accumulation of GANGLIOSIDES in LYSOSOMES secondary to enzymatic deficiency states. Gangliosidoses include TAY- SACHS DISEASE; GANGLIOSIDOSIS GM1; GANGLIOSIDOSES GM2; and SANDHOFF DISEASE; which share the infantile or childhood onset of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM deterioration. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp89-97)

Ganglioside Storage Disorder
A group of often fatal inherited diseases marked by the accumulation of GANGLIOSIDES in LYSOSOMES secondary to enzymatic deficiency states. Gangliosidoses include TAY- SACHS DISEASE; GANGLIOSIDOSIS GM1; GANGLIOSIDOSES GM2; and SANDHOFF DISEASE; which share the infantile or childhood onset of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM deterioration. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp89-97)

Ganglioside Storage Disorders
A group of often fatal inherited diseases marked by the accumulation of GANGLIOSIDES in LYSOSOMES secondary to enzymatic deficiency states. Gangliosidoses include TAY- SACHS DISEASE; GANGLIOSIDOSIS GM1; GANGLIOSIDOSES GM2; and SANDHOFF DISEASE; which share the infantile or childhood onset of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM deterioration. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp89-97)

Ganglioside, Tay-Sachs Disease
A glycosphingolipid that accumulates due to a deficiency of hexosaminidase A or B (BETA-N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE), or GM2 activator protein, resulting in GANGLIOSIDOSES, heredity metabolic disorders that include TAY-SACHS DISEASE and SANDHOFF DISEASE.

Gangliosides
A subclass of ACIDIC GLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS. They contain one or more sialic acid (N-ACETYLNEURAMINIC ACID) residues. Using the Svennerholm system of abbrevations, gangliosides are designated G for ganglioside, plus subscript M, D, or T for mono-, di-, or trisialo, respectively, the subscript letter being followed by a subscript arabic numeral to indicated sequence of migration in thin-layer chromatograms. (From Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1997)

Gangliosidoses
A group of often fatal inherited diseases marked by the accumulation of GANGLIOSIDES in LYSOSOMES secondary to enzymatic deficiency states. Gangliosidoses include TAY- SACHS DISEASE; GANGLIOSIDOSIS GM1; GANGLIOSIDOSES GM2; and SANDHOFF DISEASE; which share the infantile or childhood onset of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM deterioration. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp89-97)

Gangliosidoses GM2
Inherited diseases characterized by the accumulation of G(M2) GANGLIOSIDE in central nervous system lysosomes and variably in other tissues. Subtypes include TAY-SACHS DISEASE and SANDHOFF DISEASE, as well as an AB variant of BETA-N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE deficiency and an adult onset form of GM2 Gangliosidosis.

Gangliosidoses, GM2
Inherited diseases characterized by the accumulation of G(M2) GANGLIOSIDE in central nervous system lysosomes and variably in other tissues. Subtypes include TAY-SACHS DISEASE and SANDHOFF DISEASE, as well as an AB variant of BETA-N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE deficiency and an adult onset form of GM2 Gangliosidosis.

Gangliosidosis
A group of often fatal inherited diseases marked by the accumulation of GANGLIOSIDES in LYSOSOMES secondary to enzymatic deficiency states. Gangliosidoses include TAY- SACHS DISEASE; GANGLIOSIDOSIS GM1; GANGLIOSIDOSES GM2; and SANDHOFF DISEASE; which share the infantile or childhood onset of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM deterioration. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp89-97)

Gangliosidosis G(M1)
A form of gangliosidosis characterized by accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides in lysosomes caused by an absence or severe deficiency of the enzyme BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (type A1). The three phenotypes of this disorder are infantile (generalized), juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, hypotonia, poor psychomotor development, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features hyperacusis, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive intellectual deterioration, involuntary movements, ataxia, and spasticity. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)

Gangliosidosis G(M2), Type I
An autosomal recessive inherited gangliosidosis characterized by the onset in the first 6 months of life of an exaggerated startle response, delay in psychomotor development, hypotonia (followed by spasticity), visual loss, and a macular cherry red spot. Hexosaminidase A (see BETA-N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE) is deficient, leading to the accumulation of GM2 ganglioside in neurons of the central nervous system and retina. This condition is strongly associated with Askenazic Jewish ancestory. (Menkes, Textbook of Pediatric Neurology, 5th ed pp89-96)

Gangliosidosis G(M2), Type II
An autosomal inherited disease caused by deficiency of the enzymes hexosaminidase A & B (see BETA-N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE) which leads to an accumulation of GM2 ganglioside and the sphingolipid globoside in neurons and other organs. Clinical manifestations resemble TAY-SACHS DISEASE, but the disease is not limited to Askenazi Jews and may feature hepatosplenomegaly. The infantile form presents in the first 4 months of life with psychomotor delay, hypotonia followed by spasticity, and cherry red spots in the macula. Rare juvenile and adult forms have been reported. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p92)

Gangliosidosis GM1
A form of gangliosidosis characterized by accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides in lysosomes caused by an absence or severe deficiency of the enzyme BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (type A1). The three phenotypes of this disorder are infantile (generalized), juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, hypotonia, poor psychomotor development, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features hyperacusis, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive intellectual deterioration, involuntary movements, ataxia, and spasticity. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)

Gangliosidosis GM1, Adult
A form of gangliosidosis characterized by accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides in lysosomes caused by an absence or severe deficiency of the enzyme BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (type A1). The three phenotypes of this disorder are infantile (generalized), juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, hypotonia, poor psychomotor development, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features hyperacusis, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive intellectual deterioration, involuntary movements, ataxia, and spasticity. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)

Gangliosidosis GM1, Infantile
A form of gangliosidosis characterized by accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides in lysosomes caused by an absence or severe deficiency of the enzyme BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (type A1). The three phenotypes of this disorder are infantile (generalized), juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, hypotonia, poor psychomotor development, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features hyperacusis, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive intellectual deterioration, involuntary movements, ataxia, and spasticity. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)

Gangliosidosis GM1, Juvenile
A form of gangliosidosis characterized by accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides in lysosomes caused by an absence or severe deficiency of the enzyme BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (type A1). The three phenotypes of this disorder are infantile (generalized), juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, hypotonia, poor psychomotor development, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features hyperacusis, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive intellectual deterioration, involuntary movements, ataxia, and spasticity. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)

Gangliosidosis GM1, Type 1
A form of gangliosidosis characterized by accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides in lysosomes caused by an absence or severe deficiency of the enzyme BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (type A1). The three phenotypes of this disorder are infantile (generalized), juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, hypotonia, poor psychomotor development, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features hyperacusis, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive intellectual deterioration, involuntary movements, ataxia, and spasticity. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)

Gangliosidosis GM1, Type 2
A form of gangliosidosis characterized by accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides in lysosomes caused by an absence or severe deficiency of the enzyme BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (type A1). The three phenotypes of this disorder are infantile (generalized), juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, hypotonia, poor psychomotor development, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features hyperacusis, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive intellectual deterioration, involuntary movements, ataxia, and spasticity. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)

Gangliosidosis GM1, Type 3
A form of gangliosidosis characterized by accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides in lysosomes caused by an absence or severe deficiency of the enzyme BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (type A1). The three phenotypes of this disorder are infantile (generalized), juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, hypotonia, poor psychomotor development, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features hyperacusis, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive intellectual deterioration, involuntary movements, ataxia, and spasticity. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)

Gangliosidosis GM2, AB Variant
Inherited diseases characterized by the accumulation of G(M2) GANGLIOSIDE in central nervous system lysosomes and variably in other tissues. Subtypes include TAY-SACHS DISEASE and SANDHOFF DISEASE, as well as an AB variant of BETA-N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE deficiency and an adult onset form of GM2 Gangliosidosis.

Gangliosidosis GM2, Type AB
Inherited diseases characterized by the accumulation of G(M2) GANGLIOSIDE in central nervous system lysosomes and variably in other tissues. Subtypes include TAY-SACHS DISEASE and SANDHOFF DISEASE, as well as an AB variant of BETA-N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE deficiency and an adult onset form of GM2 Gangliosidosis.

Gangliosidosis GM2, Type I
An autosomal recessive inherited gangliosidosis characterized by the onset in the first 6 months of life of an exaggerated startle response, delay in psychomotor development, hypotonia (followed by spasticity), visual loss, and a macular cherry red spot. Hexosaminidase A (see BETA-N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE) is deficient, leading to the accumulation of GM2 ganglioside in neurons of the central nervous system and retina. This condition is strongly associated with Askenazic Jewish ancestory. (Menkes, Textbook of Pediatric Neurology, 5th ed pp89-96)

Gangliosidosis GM2, Type II
An autosomal inherited disease caused by deficiency of the enzymes hexosaminidase A & B (see BETA-N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE) which leads to an accumulation of GM2 ganglioside and the sphingolipid globoside in neurons and other organs. Clinical manifestations resemble TAY-SACHS DISEASE, but the disease is not limited to Askenazi Jews and may feature hepatosplenomegaly. The infantile form presents in the first 4 months of life with psychomotor delay, hypotonia followed by spasticity, and cherry red spots in the macula. Rare juvenile and adult forms have been reported. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p92)

Gangliosidosis, Generalized
A form of gangliosidosis characterized by accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides in lysosomes caused by an absence or severe deficiency of the enzyme BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (type A1). The three phenotypes of this disorder are infantile (generalized), juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, hypotonia, poor psychomotor development, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features hyperacusis, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive intellectual deterioration, involuntary movements, ataxia, and spasticity. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)

Gangliosidosis, GM1
A form of gangliosidosis characterized by accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides in lysosomes caused by an absence or severe deficiency of the enzyme BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (type A1). The three phenotypes of this disorder are infantile (generalized), juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, hypotonia, poor psychomotor development, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features hyperacusis, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive intellectual deterioration, involuntary movements, ataxia, and spasticity. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)

Gangliosidosis, GM2
Inherited diseases characterized by the accumulation of G(M2) GANGLIOSIDE in central nervous system lysosomes and variably in other tissues. Subtypes include TAY-SACHS DISEASE and SANDHOFF DISEASE, as well as an AB variant of BETA-N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE deficiency and an adult onset form of GM2 Gangliosidosis.

Gangrene, Dental Pulp
Death of pulp tissue. When the necrosis is due to ischemia with superimposed bacterial infection, it is referred to as pulp gangrene.

Gangrene, Fournier
An acute infective gangrene involving the scrotum, penis, or perineum caused by gram-positive organisms, enteric bacilli, and anaerobes, usually resulting from local trauma, operative procedures, or urinary tract disease.

Gangrene, Gas
A severe condition resulting from bacteria invading healthy muscle from adjacent traumatized muscle or soft tissue. The infection originates in a wound contaminated with bacteria of the genus CLOSTRIDIUM. C. perfringens accounts for the majority of cases (over eighty percent), while C. noyvi, C. septicum, and C. histolyticum cause most of the other cases.

Gangrene, Pulp
Death of pulp tissue. When the necrosis is due to ischemia with superimposed bacterial infection, it is referred to as pulp gangrene.

Gangrenes
Death and putrefaction of tissue usually due to a loss of blood supply.

Gangrenes, Fournier
An acute infective gangrene involving the scrotum, penis, or perineum caused by gram-positive organisms, enteric bacilli, and anaerobes, usually resulting from local trauma, operative procedures, or urinary tract disease.

Gangrenes, Gas
A severe condition resulting from bacteria invading healthy muscle from adjacent traumatized muscle or soft tissue. The infection originates in a wound contaminated with bacteria of the genus CLOSTRIDIUM. C. perfringens accounts for the majority of cases (over eighty percent), while C. noyvi, C. septicum, and C. histolyticum cause most of the other cases.

Gangrenous Stomatitides
A severe gangrenous process occurring predominantly in debilitated and malnourished children, especially in underdeveloped countries. It typically begins as a small vesicle or ulcer on the gingiva that rapidly becomes necrotic and spreads to produce extensive destruction of the buccal and labial mucosa and tissues of the face, which may result in severe disfigurement and even death. Various bacteria have been implicated in the etiology. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Gangrenous Stomatitis
A severe gangrenous process occurring predominantly in debilitated and malnourished children, especially in underdeveloped countries. It typically begins as a small vesicle or ulcer on the gingiva that rapidly becomes necrotic and spreads to produce extensive destruction of the buccal and labial mucosa and tissues of the face, which may result in severe disfigurement and even death. Various bacteria have been implicated in the etiology. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Gangreung doctors
All doctors near Gangreung, South Korea. Doctors who can assist a patient in Gangreung.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Gall
The bile produced in the liver and stored in the gallbladder.

Gallbladder
The storage sac for bile, located below the liver.

Gallstone
A stone-like mass that forms in the gallbladder.

Gamma globulin
Blood protein that contains most antibodies. Used in the temporary prevention of hepatitis and as treatment for disorders with antibody deficiencies.

Ganglion cyst
A benign, knot-like, cystic tumor on a tendon sheath.

Gangrene

Gastrointestinal
Having to do with the stomach and intestines.

Genetic
Hereditary. Having to do with the genes.

Genitourinary system
The genitals and urinary organs.

Geriatrics
The branch of medicine devoted to the elderly.

Germ
A disease-causing microorganism.

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