Forearm
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  Forearm



Forearm

   The portion of the upper limb from the elbow to the wrist. In popular usage, the arm extends from the shoulder to the hand. However, in medical terminology, the arm refers to the upper extremity extending from the shoulder only to the elbow. The arm is thus distinguished in medical usage from the forearm, which extends from the elbow to the wrist.The forearm has 2 bones: the radius and ulna.

RELATED TERMS
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Elbow
The juncture of the long bones in the middle portion of the arm. The bone of the upper arm (humerus) meets both the ulna (the inner bone of the forearm) and radius (the outer bone of the forearm) to form a hinge joint at the elbow. The radius and ulna also meet one another in the elbow to permit a small amount of rotation of the forearm. The elbow therefore functions to move the arm like a hinge (forward and backward) and in rotation (outward and inward). The biceps muscle is the major muscle that flexes the elbow hinge, and the triceps muscle is the major muscle that extends it. The primary stability of the elbow is provided by the ulnar collateral ligament, located on the medial (inner) side of the elbow. The outer bony prominence of the elbow is the lateral epicondyle, a part of the humerus bone. Tendons attached to this area can be injured, causing inflammation or tendonitis (lateral epicondylitis, or tennis elbow). The inner portion of the elbow is a bony prominence called the medial epicondyle of the humerus. Additional tendons from muscles attach here and can be injured, likewise causing inflammation or tendonitis (medial epicondylitis, or golfer's elbow).

Wrist
The joint or part of the arm between the hand and the forearm.

Shoulder
The ball-and-socket joint connecting the arm with the body.

Medical
Pertaining to Medicine.

Extremity
The extremities in medical language are not freezing cold or scorching heat but rather the uttermost parts of the body. The extremities are simply the hands and feet.

Forearm
The portion of the upper limb from the elbow to the wrist. In popular usage, the arm extends from the shoulder to the hand. However, in medical terminology, the arm refers to the upper extremity extending from the shoulder only to the elbow. The arm is thus distinguished in medical usage from the forearm, which extends from the elbow to the wrist.The forearm has 2 bones: the radius and ulna.

Ulna
Forearm bone on the side of the little finger.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Forearm Injuries
Injuries to the part of the upper limb of the body between the wrist and elbow.

Forearm Injury
Injuries to the part of the upper limb of the body between the wrist and elbow.

Forebrain
The part of the brain developed from the most rostral of the three primary vesicles of the embryonic neural tube and consisting of the DIENCEPHALON and TELENCEPHALON.

Forebrain Bundle, Medial
A complex group of fibers arising from the basal olfactory regions, the periamygdaloid region, and the septal nuclei, and passing to the lateral hypothalamus. Some fibers continue into the tegmentum.

Forebrain Bundle, Median
A complex group of fibers arising from the basal olfactory regions, the periamygdaloid region, and the septal nuclei, and passing to the lateral hypothalamus. Some fibers continue into the tegmentum.

Forebrain Bundles, Medial
A complex group of fibers arising from the basal olfactory regions, the periamygdaloid region, and the septal nuclei, and passing to the lateral hypothalamus. Some fibers continue into the tegmentum.

Forebrain Bundles, Median
A complex group of fibers arising from the basal olfactory regions, the periamygdaloid region, and the septal nuclei, and passing to the lateral hypothalamus. Some fibers continue into the tegmentum.

Forebrains
The part of the brain developed from the most rostral of the three primary vesicles of the embryonic neural tube and consisting of the DIENCEPHALON and TELENCEPHALON.

Forecast, Bayesian
A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihoods of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.

Forecasting
The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.

Forecasts, Population
The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.

Foredoomance
The inevitable consequence of living culminating in eventual degeneration, decline, disease and death; one of the five universal exigencies of being human.

Forefoot, Human
The forepart of the foot including the metatarsals and the TOES.

Forehead
The part of the face above the eyes.

Forehead Trauma
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Forehead Traumas
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Foreheads
The part of the face above the eyes.

Foreign Aid
The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.

Foreign body airway obstruction
Partial or complete blockage of the breathing tubes to the lungs due to a foreign body.

Foreign Body Giant Cell
Multinucleated cells (fused macrophages), characteristic of granulomatous inflammation, which form around exogenous material in the skin. They are similar in appearance to Langhans giant cells (GIANT CELLS, LANGHANS), but foreign-body giant cells have more abundant chromatin and their nuclei are scattered in an irregular pattern in the cytoplasm.

Foreign Body Giant Cells
Multinucleated cells (fused macrophages), characteristic of granulomatous inflammation, which form around exogenous material in the skin. They are similar in appearance to Langhans giant cells (GIANT CELLS, LANGHANS), but foreign-body giant cells have more abundant chromatin and their nuclei are scattered in an irregular pattern in the cytoplasm.

Foreign Body Granuloma
Histiocytic, inflammatory response to a foreign body. It consists of modified macrophages with multinucleated giant cells, in this case foreign-body giant cells (GIANT CELLS, FOREIGN-BODY), usually surrounded by lymphocytes.

Foreign Body Migration
Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.

Foreign Body Reaction
Chronic inflammation and granuloma formation around irritating foreign bodies.

Foreign Body Type Giant Cells
Multinucleated cells (fused macrophages), characteristic of granulomatous inflammation, which form around exogenous material in the skin. They are similar in appearance to Langhans giant cells (GIANT CELLS, LANGHANS), but foreign-body giant cells have more abundant chromatin and their nuclei are scattered in an irregular pattern in the cytoplasm.

Foreign Body-Type Giant Cells
Multinucleated cells (fused macrophages), characteristic of granulomatous inflammation, which form around exogenous material in the skin. They are similar in appearance to Langhans giant cells (GIANT CELLS, LANGHANS), but foreign-body giant cells have more abundant chromatin and their nuclei are scattered in an irregular pattern in the cytoplasm.

Foreign Medical Graduate
Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.

Foreign Medical Graduates
Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.

Foreign Professional Personnel
Persons who have acquired academic or specialized training in countries other than that in which they are working. The concept excludes physicians for which FOREIGN MEDICAL GRADUATES is the likely heading.

Foreign-Body Giant Cell
Multinucleated cells (fused macrophages), characteristic of granulomatous inflammation, which form around exogenous material in the skin. They are similar in appearance to Langhans giant cells (GIANT CELLS, LANGHANS), but foreign-body giant cells have more abundant chromatin and their nuclei are scattered in an irregular pattern in the cytoplasm.

Foreign-Body Giant Cells
Multinucleated cells (fused macrophages), characteristic of granulomatous inflammation, which form around exogenous material in the skin. They are similar in appearance to Langhans giant cells (GIANT CELLS, LANGHANS), but foreign-body giant cells have more abundant chromatin and their nuclei are scattered in an irregular pattern in the cytoplasm.

Foreign-Body Granuloma
Histiocytic, inflammatory response to a foreign body. It consists of modified macrophages with multinucleated giant cells, in this case foreign-body giant cells (GIANT CELLS, FOREIGN-BODY), usually surrounded by lymphocytes.

Foreign-Body Granulomas
Histiocytic, inflammatory response to a foreign body. It consists of modified macrophages with multinucleated giant cells, in this case foreign-body giant cells (GIANT CELLS, FOREIGN-BODY), usually surrounded by lymphocytes.

Foreign-Body Migration
Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.

Foreign-Body Migrations
Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.

Foreign-Body Reaction
Chronic inflammation and granuloma formation around irritating foreign bodies.

Forelimb
A front limb of a quadruped. (The Random House College Dictionary, 1980)

Forelimbs
A front limb of a quadruped. (The Random House College Dictionary, 1980)

Forensic
Pertaining to or applied in legal proceedings.

Forensic anthropology
The application of the science of physical anthropology to the legal process. Forensic anthropology includes the identification of skeletal, decomposed, or unidentified human remains. Forensic anthropologists may team up with forensic pathologists, forensic dentists, and homicide detectives to identify a dead person and the time and manner of their death. Forensic anthropology may also help determine the age, sex, stature, and unique features of the deceased from their remains. DNA forensics, blood groups, and fingerprints are all tools of the trade in forensic anthropology today.

Forensic Anthropology
Scientific study of human skeletal remains with the express purpose of identification. This includes establishing individual identity, trauma analysis, facial reconstruction, photographic superimposition, determination of time interval since death, and crime-scene recovery. Forensic anthropologists do not certify cause of death but provide data to assist in determination of probable cause. This is a branch of the field of physical anthropology and qualified individuals are certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1992 Jun;13(2):146)

Forensic dentistry
Practice of gathering legal evidence for body identification or judicial issues.

Forensic Dentistry
The application of dental knowledge to questions of law.

Forensic genetics
The branch of genetics that deals with the application of genetic knowledge to legal problems and legal proceedings. Forensic genetics is also a branch of forensic medicine which deals more broadly with the application of medical knowledge to legal matters.

Forensic medicine
The branch of medicine that deals with the application of medical knowledge to legal problems and legal proceedings. Also called legal medicine. A physician may be engaged in forensic (or legal) medicine; a lawyer with comparable interests is said to be engaged in medical jurisprudence.

Forensic Medicine
The application of medical knowledge to questions of law.

Forensics
Forensics or forensic science is the application of science to questions which are of interest to the legal system. For example, forensic pathology is the study of the human body to determine cause and manner of death. Criminalistics is the application of various sciences to answer questions relating to examination and comparison of biological evidence, trace evidence, impression evidence, drugs and firearms. Forensic odontology is the study of the uniqueness of dentition. Etcetera.

Foreplay
The traditional term for erotosexual activity during the proceptive phase in which manual, oral, and other skin and body contact ensure erection of the penis, lubrication of the vagina, and an urgency of being ready for orgasm, usually penovaginally induced.

Foreskin
The flap of skin that normally covers the head of the penis; it is removed when a baby is circumcised.

Foreskin and glans, inflammation of the
In the uncircumcised male, balanitis (inflammation of the glans, the rounded head of the penis) and posthitis (inflammation of the foreskin) usually occur together as balanoposthitis: inflammation of both the glans and foreskin. Circumcision prevents balanoposthitis. Without a foreskin, there can of course be no posthitis and hence no balanoposthitis.

Foreskin, inflammation of the
Inflammation of the foreskin of the penis (the prepuce) is called posthitis. In the uncircumcised male, posthitis and balanitis (inflammation of the glans, the rounded head of the penis) usually occur together as balanoposthitis: inflammation of both the glans and foreskin. Circumcision prevents balanoposthitis. Without a foreskin, there can of course be no posthitis and hence no balanoposthitis.

Forest County Medical Center
The Forest County Medical Center is a hospital in Tionesta, Pennsylvania, United States.

Forest Disease, Kyasanur
Tick-borne flavivirus infection occurring in the Kyasanur Forest in India.

Forest Park Health Center
The Forest Park Health Center is a hospital in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, United States.

Forest Park Hospital
Forest Park Hospital is a hospital in Saint Louis, Missouri (USA).

Forestier Certonciny Syndrome
A syndrome in the elderly characterized by proximal joint and muscle pain, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and a self-limiting course. Pain is usually accompanied by evidence of an inflammatory reaction. Women are affected twice as commonly as men and Caucasians more frequently than other groups. The condition is frequently associated with TEMPORAL ARTERITIS and some theories pose the possibility that the two diseases arise from a single etiology or even that they are the same entity.

Forestier disease
A form of degenerative arthritis characteristically associated with flowing calcification along the sides of the vertebrae of the spine and commonly with inflammation (tendinitis) and calcification of the tendons at their attachments points to bone. Because areas of the spine and tendons can become inflamed, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen can be helpful in relieving both pain and inflammation. Forestier disease is also called diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH).

Forestier Disease
A disease of elderly men characterized by large osteophytes that bridge vertebrae and ossification of ligaments and tendon insertions.

Forestier's disease
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. (DISH, Ankylosing hyperostosis). Florid new bone formation at entheses results in spinal stiffness. May be confused with ankylosing spondylitis.

Forestier-Certonciny Syndrome
A syndrome in the elderly characterized by proximal joint and muscle pain, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and a self-limiting course. Pain is usually accompanied by evidence of an inflammatory reaction. Women are affected twice as commonly as men and Caucasians more frequently than other groups. The condition is frequently associated with TEMPORAL ARTERITIS and some theories pose the possibility that the two diseases arise from a single etiology or even that they are the same entity.

Forestry
The science of developing, caring for, or cultivating forests.

Forests
Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Foramen, interventricular
An opening between the lateral and third ventricles in a system of four communicating cavities within the brain that are continuous with the central canal of the spinal cord.

Foramina
The plural of foramen, a natural opening. As in the foramina of Luschka.

Foramina of Luschka
Opening from the fourth ventricle, one in a system of four communicating cavities called ventricles within the brain that are continuous with the central canal of the spinal cord.

Forced expiratory volume
The volume of air that can be forced out taking a deep breath, an important measure of pulmonary function. The forced expiratory volume in the first second is the FEV1.

Forceps, obstetrical
An instrument designed as an aid in the vaginal delivery of a baby. Forceps may be used to ease delivery or to cope with problems of fetal distress or fetal position. The decision to use forceps or do a C-section must be made by an obstetrician.

Forearm

Foreign body airway obstruction
Partial or complete blockage of the breathing tubes to the lungs due to a foreign body.

Forensic anthropology
The application of the science of physical anthropology to the legal process. Forensic anthropology includes the identification of skeletal, decomposed, or unidentified human remains. Forensic anthropologists may team up with forensic pathologists, forensic dentists, and homicide detectives to identify a dead person and the time and manner of their death. Forensic anthropology may also help determine the age, sex, stature, and unique features of the deceased from their remains. DNA forensics, blood groups, and fingerprints are all tools of the trade in forensic anthropology today.

Forensic genetics
The branch of genetics that deals with the application of genetic knowledge to legal problems and legal proceedings. Forensic genetics is also a branch of forensic medicine which deals more broadly with the application of medical knowledge to legal matters.

Forensic medicine
The branch of medicine that deals with the application of medical knowledge to legal problems and legal proceedings. Also called legal medicine. A physician may be engaged in forensic (or legal) medicine; a lawyer with comparable interests is said to be engaged in medical jurisprudence.

Foreskin and glans, inflammation of the
In the uncircumcised male, balanitis (inflammation of the glans, the rounded head of the penis) and posthitis (inflammation of the foreskin) usually occur together as balanoposthitis: inflammation of both the glans and foreskin. Circumcision prevents balanoposthitis. Without a foreskin, there can of course be no posthitis and hence no balanoposthitis.

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