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  Fever



Fever

    When body temperature rises above its normal level - defined as 98.6 degrees F, though it varies by individual and time of day. A fever is the sign of an immune system at work and usually indicates an infection.

RELATED TERMS
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Fever
When body temperature rises above its normal level - defined as 98.6 degrees F, though it varies by individual and time of day. A fever is the sign of an immune system at work and usually indicates an infection.

Sign
An objective manifestation of a pathological condition. Signs are observed by the examiner rather than reported by the affected individual.

Immune
Resistant to a particular disease.

Infection




SIMILAR TERMS
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Fever blister
A small sore situated on the face or in the mouth that causes pain, burning, or itching before bursting and crusting over. The favorite locations are on the lips, chin or cheeks and in the nostrils. Less frequented sites are the gums or roof of the mouth (the palate).

Fever Blister
Herpes simplex, caused by type 1 virus, primarily spread by oral secretions and usually occurring as a concomitant of fever. It may also develop in the absence of fever or prior illness. It commonly involves the facial region, especially the lips and the nares. (Dorland, 27th ed.)

Fever Blisters
Herpes simplex, caused by type 1 virus, primarily spread by oral secretions and usually occurring as a concomitant of fever. It may also develop in the absence of fever or prior illness. It commonly involves the facial region, especially the lips and the nares. (Dorland, 27th ed.)

Fever Convulsion
Seizures that occur during a febrile episode. It is a common condition, affecting 2-5% of children aged 3 months to five years. An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance has been identified in some families. The majority are simple febrile seizures (generally defined as generalized onset, single seizures with a duration of less than 30 minutes). Complex febrile seizures are characterized by focal onset, duration greater than 30 minutes, and/or more than one seizure in a 24 hour period. The likelihood of developing epilepsy (i.e., a nonfebrile seizure disorder) following simple febrile seizures is low. Complex febrile seizures are associated with a moderately increased incidence of epilepsy. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p784)

Fever Convulsions
Seizures that occur during a febrile episode. It is a common condition, affecting 2-5% of children aged 3 months to five years. An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance has been identified in some families. The majority are simple febrile seizures (generally defined as generalized onset, single seizures with a duration of less than 30 minutes). Complex febrile seizures are characterized by focal onset, duration greater than 30 minutes, and/or more than one seizure in a 24 hour period. The likelihood of developing epilepsy (i.e., a nonfebrile seizure disorder) following simple febrile seizures is low. Complex febrile seizures are associated with a moderately increased incidence of epilepsy. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p784)

Fever of Unknown Origin
Fever in which the etiology cannot be ascertained.

Fever Seizure
Seizures that occur during a febrile episode. It is a common condition, affecting 2-5% of children aged 3 months to five years. An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance has been identified in some families. The majority are simple febrile seizures (generally defined as generalized onset, single seizures with a duration of less than 30 minutes). Complex febrile seizures are characterized by focal onset, duration greater than 30 minutes, and/or more than one seizure in a 24 hour period. The likelihood of developing epilepsy (i.e., a nonfebrile seizure disorder) following simple febrile seizures is low. Complex febrile seizures are associated with a moderately increased incidence of epilepsy. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p784)

Fever Seizures
Seizures that occur during a febrile episode. It is a common condition, affecting 2-5% of children aged 3 months to five years. An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance has been identified in some families. The majority are simple febrile seizures (generally defined as generalized onset, single seizures with a duration of less than 30 minutes). Complex febrile seizures are characterized by focal onset, duration greater than 30 minutes, and/or more than one seizure in a 24 hour period. The likelihood of developing epilepsy (i.e., a nonfebrile seizure disorder) following simple febrile seizures is low. Complex febrile seizures are associated with a moderately increased incidence of epilepsy. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p784)

Fever Therapy
Abnormally high temperature intentionally induced in living things regionally or whole body. It is most often induced by radiation (heat waves, infra-red), ultrasound, or drugs.

Fever Vaccine, Yellow
Vaccine used to prevent YELLOW FEVER. It consists of a live attenuated 17D strain of the YELLOW FEVER VIRUS.

Fever Virus, Breakbone
A species of the genus FLAVIVIRUS which causes an acute febrile and sometimes hemorrhagic disease in man. Dengue is mosquito-borne and four serotypes are known.

Fever Viruses, Breakbone
A species of the genus FLAVIVIRUS which causes an acute febrile and sometimes hemorrhagic disease in man. Dengue is mosquito-borne and four serotypes are known.

Fever with renal syndrome, hemorrhagic
A set of diseases, also known as hemorrhagic fever, characterized by the abrupt onset of high fever and chills, headache, cold and cough, and pain in the muscles, joints and abdomen with nausea and vomiting followed by bleeding into the kidney and elsewhere.

Fever, American Hemorrhagic
Diseases caused by American hemorrhagic fever viruses (ARENAVIRUSES, NEW WORLD).

Fever, Animal Milk
A disease of pregnant and lactating cows and ewes leading to generalized paresis and death. The disease, which is characterized by hypocalcemia, occurs at or shortly after parturition in cows and within weeks before or after parturition in ewes.

Fever, Argentinian Hemorrhagic
Diseases caused by American hemorrhagic fever viruses (ARENAVIRUSES, NEW WORLD).

Fever, Black Water
A complication of MALARIA, FALCIPARUM characterized by the passage of dark red to black urine.

Fever, Blackwater
A complication of MALARIA, FALCIPARUM characterized by the passage of dark red to black urine.

Fever, Bolivian Hemorrhagic
Diseases caused by American hemorrhagic fever viruses (ARENAVIRUSES, NEW WORLD).

Fever, Boutonneuse
A febrile disease of the Mediterranean area, the Crimea, Africa, and India, caused by infection with RICKETTSIA CONORII.

Fever, breakbone
An acute mosquito-borne viral illness of sudden onset that usually follows a benign course with headache, fever, prostration, severe joint and muscle pain, swollen glands (lymphadenopathy) and rash. The presence (the "dengue triad") of fever, rash, and headache (and other pains) is particularly characteristic. Better known as dengue, the disease is endemic throughout the tropics and subtropics. It goes by other names including dandy fever. Victims of dengue often have contortions due to the intense joint and muscle pain.

Fever, cat scratch
A bacterial infection due to a cat scratch seen most often today in people with HIV. The disease characteristically presents with swollen lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), sore throat, fatigue, and fever, chills, sweats, vomiting, loss of appetite, and weight loss. There is usually a little bump (a papule) which may be pus-filled (a pustule) at the site of the scratch. Then more nodules appear on and under the skin. As the number of nodules increases, patients get sicker.

Fever, Colorado Tick
A febrile illness characterized by chills, aches, vomiting, leukopenia, and sometimes encephalitis. It is caused by the COLORADO TICK FEVER VIRUS, a reovirus transmitted by the tick Dermacentor andersoni.

Fever, Crimean Hemorrhagic
A severe, often fatal disease in humans caused by the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER VIRUS, CRIMEAN-CONGO).

Fever, dandy
An acute mosquito- borne viral illness of sudden onset that usually follows a benign course with headache, fever, prostration, severe joint and muscle pain, swollen glands (lymphadenopathy) and rash. The presence (the "dengue triad") of fever, rash, and headache (and other pains) is particularly characteristic. Better known as dengue, the disease is endemic throughout the tropics and subtropics. It goes by other names including breakbone fever. Victims of dengue often have contortions due to the intense joint and muscle pain

Fever, dengue
An acute mosquito-borne viral illness of sudden onset that usually follows a benign course with headache, fever, prostration, severe joint and muscle pain, swollen glands (lymphadenopathy) and rash. The presence (the "dengue triad") of fever, rash, and headache (and other pains) is particularly characteristic of dengue. Dengue is endemic throughout the tropics and subtropics. It goes by other names including breakbone or dandy fever. Victims of dengue often have contortions due to the intense joint and muscle pain.

Fever, Dengue
An acute infectious, eruptive, febrile disease caused by four antigenically related but distinct serotypes of the DENGUE VIRUS. It is transmitted by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes, especially A. aegypti. Classical dengue (dengue fever) is self-limiting and characterized by fever, myalgia, headache, and rash. DENGUE HEMORRHAGIC FEVER is a more virulent form of dengue virus infection and a separate clinical entity. (From Dorland, 28th ed)

Fever, dengue hemorrhagic (DHF)
A syndrome due to the dengue virus that tends to affect children under 10, causing abdominal pain, hemorrhage (bleeding) and circulatory collapse (shock). DHF starts abruptly with high continuous fever and headache plus respiratory and intestinal symptoms with sore throat, cough, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Shock occurs after 2 to 6 days with sudden collapse, cool clammy extremities, weak thready pulse, and blueness around the mouth (circumoral cyanosis). There is bleeding with easy bruising, blood spots in the skin (petechiae), spitting up blood (hematemesis), blood in the stool (melena), bleeding gums and nosebleeds (epistaxis). Pneumonia and heart inflammation (myocarditis) may be present. The mortality is appreciable ranging from 6 to 30%. Most deaths occur in children. Infants under a year of age are especially at risk of death. DHF is also called Philippine, Thai, or Southeast Asian hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome.

Fever, desert
A disease also called coccidioidomycosis (CM) due to a fungus called Coccidioides immitis. About 40% of people infected with this fungus develop symptoms. Most often they have an influenza-like illness with fever, cough, headaches, rash, and myalgias (muscle pains). Of those people with symptoms, 8% have severe lung disease requiring hospitalization and 7% develop disseminated infection (throughout the body).

Fever, dumdum
Also called kala-azar, a chronic, potentially fatal parasitic disease of the viscera (the internal organs) due to infection by an agent called Leishmania donovani.

Fever, East Coast
Infection of cattle, sheep, or goats with protozoa of the genus THEILERIA. This infection results in an acute or chronic febrile condition.

Fever, Ebola virus
A notoriously deadly virus that causes fearsome symptoms, the most prominent being high fever and massive internal bleeding. Ebola virus kills as many as 90% of the people it infects. It is one of the viruses that is capable of causing hemorrhagic (bloody) fever.

Fever, Enteric
An acute systemic febrile infection caused by SALMONELLA TYPHI.

Fever, Ephemeral
An Ephemerovirus infection of cattle caused by bovine ephemeral fever virus (EPHEMERAL FEVER VIRUS, BOVINE). It is characterized by respiratory symptoms, increased oropharyngeal secretions and lacrimation, joint pains, tremor, and stiffness.

Fever, epidemic hemorrhagic
A number of diseases characterized by an abrupt onset of high fever and chills, headache, cold and cough, and pain in the muscles, joints and abdomen with nausea and vomiting followed by bleeding into the kidney and elsewhere. Known also as hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

Fever, Familial Mediterranean
An autosomal recessive inherited disease characterized by episodic fever, severe abdominal pain, pleurisy, arthritis, and a characteristic ankle rash. Disease flare-ups tend to last 3 days, and individuals are asymptomatic between attacks. Orchitis, a benign recurrent MENINGITIS, headaches, and amyloid nephropathy may also occur. (From Medicine (Baltimore) 1998 Jul;77(4):268-97)

Fever, familial Mediterranean (FMF)
An inherited disorder featuring short recurring crises of severe abdominal pain and bouts of fever. Other symptoms include arthritis, chest pain from inflammation of the lung cavity, and skin rashes. Between attacks, the patient seems healthy. Amyloidosis (the abnormal deposition of a particular protein, called amyloid, in various tissues of the body) is a potentially serious complication and can develop without overt attacks of FMF. The kidney is a prime target for the amyloid.

Fever, five-day
Also called trench fever, this is a disease borne by body lice that was first recognized in the trenches of World War I, when it is estimated to have affected more than a million people in Russia and on the fronts in Europe. Trench fever was again a major problem in the military in World War II and is seen endemically in Mexico, Africa, E. Europe, and elsewhere.

Fever, Fog
A cattle disease of uncertain cause, probably an allergic reaction.

Fever, Glandular
A common, acute infection usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (HERPESVIRUS 4, HUMAN). There is an increase in mononuclear white blood cells and other atypical lymphocytes, generalized lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and occasionally hepatomegaly with hepatitis.

Fever, Hay
A seasonal variety of allergic rhinitis, marked by acute conjunctivitis with lacrimation and itching, regarded as an allergic condition triggered by specific allergens.

Fever, hemorrhagic
A number of diseases characterized by an abrupt onset of high fever and chills, headache, cold and cough, and pain in the muscles, joints and abdomen with nausea and vomiting followed by bleeding into the kidney and elsewhere. Known also as hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

Fever, Lassa
An acute febrile human disease caused by the LASSA VIRUS.

Fever, Malta
Infection caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA mainly involving the reticuloendothelial system. This condition is characterized by fever, weakness, malaise, and weight loss.

Fever, Mediterranean
A inherited disorder of unknown cause featuring short recurring bouts of fever together with pain in the joints, chest or abdomen. Also called Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF).

Fever, Mediterranean Spotted
A febrile disease of the Mediterranean area, the Crimea, Africa, and India, caused by infection with RICKETTSIA CONORII.

Fever, Meuse
Meuse or trench fever is a disease borne by body lice that was first recognized in the trenches of World War I, when it is estimated to have affected more than a million people in Russia and on the fronts in Europe. Trench fever was again a major problem in the military in World War II and is seen endemically in Mexico, Africa, E. Europe, and elsewhere.

Fever, Omsk Hemorrhagic
Infection with the Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus, a Flavivirus.

Fever, Oroya
Infections by the genus BARTONELLA. Bartonella bacilliformis can cause acute febrile anemia, designated Oroya fever, and a benign skin eruption, called verruga peruana. BARTONELLA QUINTANA causes TRENCH FEVER, while BARTONELLA HENSELAE is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis (ANGIOMATOSIS, BACILLARY) and is also one of the causes of CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE in immunocompetent patients.

Fever, Paratyphoid
A prolonged febrile illness commonly caused by serotypes of Salmonella paratyphi. It is similar to typhoid fever but less severe.

Fever, Pharyngo-Conjunctival
Respiratory and conjunctival infections caused by 33 identified serotypes of human adenoviruses.

Fever, Philippine hemorrhagic
A syndrome due to the dengue virus that tends to affect children under 10, causing abdominal pain, hemorrhage (bleeding) and circulatory collapse (shock). Known also as dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), it starts abruptly with high continuous fever and headache plus respiratory and intestinal symptoms with sore throat, cough, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Shock occurs after 2 to 6 days with sudden collapse, cool clammy extremities, weak thready pulse, and blueness around the mouth (circumoral cyanosis). There is bleeding with easy bruising, blood spots in the skin (petechiae), spitting up blood (hematemesis), blood in the stool (melena), bleeding gums and nosebleeds (epistaxis). Pneumonia and heart inflammation (myocarditis) may be present. The mortality is appreciable ranging from 6 to 30%. Most deaths occur in children. Infants under a year of age are especially at risk of death. It is also called Thai or Southeast Asian hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome.

Fever, Pontiac
A flu-like illness caused by the bacterium Legionella pneumophila contracted by breathing mist that comes from a water source (such as air conditioning cooling towers, whirlpool spas, showers) contaminated with the bacteria. The incubation period is short, from a few hours to 2 days, before the onset of fever and muscle aches. Persons with Pontiac fever do not have pneumonia. They generally recover in 2 to 5 days without treatment. Pontiac fever is so-named because of an outbreak in 1968 in Pontiac, Michigan. It is a milder form of legionellosis than Legionnaire disease which is caused by the same bacterium.

Fever, puerperal
Fever that lasts for more than 24 hours within the first 10 days after a woman has had a baby. Puerperal fever is due to an infection, most often of the placental site within the uterus. If the infection involves the bloodstream, it constitutes puerperal sepsis. Puerperal fever has gone by a number of different names including childbirth fever, childbed fever and postpartum fever. In Latin a "puerpera" is a woman in childbirth since "puer" means child and "parere" means to give birth. The puerperium is the time immediately after the delivery of a baby.

Fever, Q
An acute febrile illness due to Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii), a species of bacteria. Q fever is a zoonotic disease (contracted from animals). Aside from sudden onset of fever, there is headache, malaise, and pneumonia but no rash.

Fever, quintan
Quintan means recurring every 5 days, the characteristic duration of trench fever.

Fever, Rat-Bite
A syndrome characterized by recurring fever, rash, and arthralgias occurring days to weeks after a rat bite. The causative agents are either Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus.

Fever, Ratbite
A syndrome characterized by recurring fever, rash, and arthralgias occurring days to weeks after a rat bite. The causative agents are either Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus.

Fever, relapsing
An acute infection with recurrent episodes of fever caused by spirochetes of the genus Borrelia which are borne by ticks or lice. The relapsing nature of the fever is associated with the presence of antigenic variants. As an immune response develops to the predominant antigenic strain, variant strains multiply and cause a recrudescent infection.

Fever, Relapsing
An acute infection characterized by recurrent episodes of pyrexia alternating with asymptomatic intervals of apparent recovery. This condition is caused by spirochetes of the genus BORRELIA. It is transmitted by the bites of either the body louse (PEDICULUS humanus corporis), for which humans are the reservoir, or by soft ticks of the genus ORNITHODOROS, for which rodents and other animals are the principal reservoirs.

Fever, remittent
A type of fever that gradually decreases in intensity over time.

Fever, rheumatic
An illness that occurs following a streptococcus infection (such as a "strep throat") or scarlet fever and predominantly affects children. Symptoms include fever, pain in the joints, nausea, stomach cramps, and vomiting. Rheumatic fever can cause long-lasting effects in the skin, joints, heart, and brain.

Fever, Rheumatic
A febrile disease occurring as a delayed sequela of infections with group A hemolytic streptococci and characterized by multiple focal inflammatory lesions of the connective tissue structures, especially of the heart, blood vessels, and joints (polyarthritis), and by the presence of Aschoff bodies in the myocardium and skin. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Fever, Rift Valley
A viral disease that is acute, causes fever in domestic animals (such as cattle, buffalo, sheep, goats, and camels) and humans, and is associated with mosquito-borne epidemics during years of heavy rainfall. Rift Valley fever is more deadly than West Nile virus.

Fever, Rocky Mountain spotted (RMSF)
An acute febrile (feverish) disease initially recognized in the Rocky Mountain states, caused by Rickettsia rickettsii transmitted by hard-shelled (ixodid) ticks. Occurs only in the Western Hemisphere. Anyone frequenting tick-infested areas is at risk for RMSF.

Fever, scarlet
Also called scarlatina, a disease caused by infection with group A streptococcal bacteria that occurs in a small proportion of people with strep throat.

Fever, Scarlet
Infection with group A streptococci that is characterized by tonsillitis and pharyngitis. An erythematous rash is commonly present.

Fever, shin bone
Called shin bone fever because it characteristically causes fever and pain in the legs, this disease is also known as trench fever.

Fever, Shipping
Bovine respiratory disease found in animals that have been shipped or exposed to cattle recently transported. It is thought to be caused by infection with the bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (see RESPIROVIRUS) or one of several other respiratory viruses, followed by infection with either PASTEURELLA MULTOCIDA or PASTEURELLA HAEMOLYTICA.

Fever, Show
A highly contagious DNA virus infection of the cat family and of mink, characterized by fever, enteritis and bone marrow changes. It is also called feline ataxia, feline agranulocytosis, feline infectious enteritis, cat fever, cat plague, show fever.

Fever, Southeast Asian hemorrhagic
A syndrome due to the dengue virus that tends to affect children under 10, causing abdominal pain, hemorrhage (bleeding) and circulatory collapse (shock). Known also as dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), it starts abruptly with high continuous fever and headache plus respiratory and intestinal symptoms with sore throat, cough, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Shock occurs after 2 to 6 days with sudden collapse, cool clammy extremities, weak thready pulse, and blueness around the mouth (circumoral cyanosis). There is bleeding with easy bruising, blood spots in the skin (petechiae), spitting up blood (hematemesis), blood in the stool (melena), bleeding gums and nosebleeds (epistaxis). Pneumonia and heart inflammation (myocarditis) may be present. The mortality is appreciable ranging from 6 to 30%. Most deaths occur in children. Infants under a year of age are especially at risk of death.

Fever, splenic
Known also as anthrax, splenic fever is a serious bacterial infection. It is not primarily a human disease but rather an infection of animals. Cattle, sheep, horses, mules, and some wild animals are highly susceptible. Humans (and swine) are generally resistant to anthrax. Anthrax can take different forms. With the lung form of the disease. People inhale the anthrax spores and, if untreated, are likely to die. An intestinal form is caused by eating meat contaminated with anthrax. But most human anthrax comes from skin contact with animal products. Cutaneous (skin) anthrax was once well known among people who handled infected animals, like farmers, woolsorters, tanners, brushmakers and carpetmakers in the days when the brushes and carpets were animal products. The hallmark of skin anthrax is a carbuncle, a cluster of boils, that ulcerates in an ugly way. Typically this lesion has a hard black center surrounded by bright red inflammation.

Fever, spotted
Also known as Rocky Mountain spotted fever. An acute febrile (feverish) disease initially recognized in the Rocky Mountain states, caused by Rickettsia rickettsii transmitted by hard-shelled (ixodid) ticks. Occurs only in the Western Hemisphere. Anyone frequenting tick-infested areas is at risk for RMSF.

Fever, Swamp
Viral disease of horses caused by the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV; INFECTIOUS ANEMIA VIRUS, EQUINE). It is characterized by intermittent fever, weakness, and anemia. Chronic infection consists of acute episodes with remissions.

Fever, Thai hemorrhagic
A syndrome due to the dengue virus that tends to affect children under 10, causing abdominal pain, hemorrhage (bleeding) and circulatory collapse (shock). Known also as dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), it starts abruptly with high continuous fever and headache plus respiratory and intestinal symptoms with sore throat, cough, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Shock occurs after 2 to 6 days with sudden collapse, cool clammy extremities, weak thready pulse, and blueness around the mouth (circumoral cyanosis). There is bleeding with easy bruising, blood spots in the skin (petechiae), spitting up blood (hematemesis), blood in the stool (melena), bleeding gums and nosebleeds (epistaxis). Pneumonia and heart inflammation (myocarditis) may be present. The mortality is appreciable ranging from 6 to 30%. Most deaths occur in children. Infants under a year of age are especially at risk of death. It is also called Philippine or Southeast Asian hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome.

Fever, trench
A disease borne by body lice that was first recognized in the trenches of World War I, when it is estimated to have affected more than a million people in Russia and on the fronts in Europe. Trench fever was again a major problem in the military in World War II and is seen endemically in Mexico, Africa, E. Europe, and elsewhere.

Fever, Trench
An intermittent fever characterized by intervals of chills, fever, and splenomegaly each of which may last as long as 40 hours. It is caused by BARTONELLA QUINTANA and transmitted by the human louse.

Fever, Tsutsugamushi
An acute infectious disease caused by ORIENTIA TSUTSUGAMUSHI. It is limited to eastern and southeastern Asia, India, northern Australia, and the adjacent islands. Characteristics include the formation of a primary cutaneous lesion at the site of the bite of an infected mite, fever lasting about two weeks, and a maculopapular rash.

Fever, typhoid
An acute illness with fever caused by infection with the Salmonella typhi bacteria contracted from contaminated water and food. The disease has an insidious onset characterized by fever, headache, constipation, malaise, chills, and myalgia (muscle pain). Diarrhea is uncommon, and vomiting is not usually severe. Confusion, delirium, intestinal perforation, and death may occur in severe cases. Without therapy, the illness may last for 3 to 4 weeks and death rates range between 12% and 30%. The disease is transmitted through contaminated drinking water or food. Large epidemics are most often related to fecal contamination of water supplies or street vended foods. A chronic carrier state -- excretion of the organism for more than 1 year -- occurs in approximately 5% of cases. Typhoid Mary was a chronic carrier.

Fever, Typhoid
An acute systemic febrile infection caused by SALMONELLA TYPHI.

Fever, undulant
An infectious disease due to the bacteria Brucella that characteristically causes rising and falling fevers, sweats, malaise, weakness, anorexia, headache, myalgia (muscle pain) and back pain. The disease is called undulant fever because the fever is typically undulant, rising and falling like a wave. It is also called brucellosis after its bacterial cause.

Fever, Undulant
Infection caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA mainly involving the reticuloendothelial system. This condition is characterized by fever, weakness, malaise, and weight loss.

Fever, Uveoparotid
A manifestation of sarcoidosis marked by chronic inflammation of the parotid gland and the uvea.

Fever, valley
A disease also called coccidioidomycosis (CM) due to a fungus called Coccidioides immitis. About 40% of people infected with this fungus develop symptoms. Most often they have an influenza-like illness with fever, cough, headaches, rash, and myalgias (muscle pains). Of those people with symptoms, 8% have severe lung disease requiring hospitalization and 7% develop disseminated infection (throughout the body).

Fever, Viral Hemorrhagic
A group of viral diseases of diverse etiology but having many similar clinical characteristics; increased capillary permeability, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia are common to all. Hemorrhagic fevers are characterized by sudden onset, fever, headache, generalized myalgia, backache, conjunctivitis, and severe prostration, followed by various hemorrhagic symptoms. Hemorrhagic fever with kidney involvement is HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME.

Fever, West Nile
A febrile disease caused by the West Nile virus that is transmitted from birds to the common Culex mosquito and then to people. The virus is named after the area it was first found in Uganda.

Fever, Wolhynia
Also known as trench fever, a disease borne by body lice that was first recognized in the trenches of World War I, when it is estimated to have affected more than a million people in Russia and on the fronts in Europe.

Fever, yellow
An acute systemic (bodywide) illness caused by a virus called a Flavivirus. In severe cases, the viral infection causes a high fever, bleeding into the skin, and necrosis (death) of cells in the kidney and liver. The damage done to the liver from the virus results in severe jaundice which yellows the skin.

Fever, Yellow
An acute infectious disease primarily of the tropics, caused by a virus and transmitted to man by mosquitoes of the genera Aedes and Haemagogus.

Feverfew
An herb that has been most commonly used for migraine headaches.

Fevers
An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.

Fevers, Black Water
A complication of MALARIA, FALCIPARUM characterized by the passage of dark red to black urine.

Fevers, Blackwater
A complication of MALARIA, FALCIPARUM characterized by the passage of dark red to black urine.

Fevers, Boutonneuse
A febrile disease of the Mediterranean area, the Crimea, Africa, and India, caused by infection with RICKETTSIA CONORII.

Fevers, Crimean Hemorrhagic
A severe, often fatal disease in humans caused by the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER VIRUS, CRIMEAN-CONGO).

Fevers, Enteric
An acute systemic febrile infection caused by SALMONELLA TYPHI.

Fevers, Lassa
An acute febrile human disease caused by the LASSA VIRUS.

Fevers, Paratyphoid
A prolonged febrile illness commonly caused by serotypes of Salmonella paratyphi. It is similar to typhoid fever but less severe.

Fevers, Q
An acute infectious disease caused by COXIELLA BURNETTI. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, headache, malaise, and weakness. In humans, it is commonly contracted by inhalation of infected dusts derived from infected domestic animals.

Fevers, Rat-Bite
A syndrome characterized by recurring fever, rash, and arthralgias occurring days to weeks after a rat bite. The causative agents are either Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus.

Fevers, Ratbite
A syndrome characterized by recurring fever, rash, and arthralgias occurring days to weeks after a rat bite. The causative agents are either Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus.

Fevers, Relapsing
An acute infection characterized by recurrent episodes of pyrexia alternating with asymptomatic intervals of apparent recovery. This condition is caused by spirochetes of the genus BORRELIA. It is transmitted by the bites of either the body louse (PEDICULUS humanus corporis), for which humans are the reservoir, or by soft ticks of the genus ORNITHODOROS, for which rodents and other animals are the principal reservoirs.

Fevers, Rheumatic
A febrile disease occurring as a delayed sequela of infections with group A hemolytic streptococci and characterized by multiple focal inflammatory lesions of the connective tissue structures, especially of the heart, blood vessels, and joints (polyarthritis), and by the presence of Aschoff bodies in the myocardium and skin. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Fevers, Scarlet
Infection with group A streptococci that is characterized by tonsillitis and pharyngitis. An erythematous rash is commonly present.

Fevers, Show
A highly contagious DNA virus infection of the cat family and of mink, characterized by fever, enteritis and bone marrow changes. It is also called feline ataxia, feline agranulocytosis, feline infectious enteritis, cat fever, cat plague, show fever.

Fevers, Swamp
Viral disease of horses caused by the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV; INFECTIOUS ANEMIA VIRUS, EQUINE). It is characterized by intermittent fever, weakness, and anemia. Chronic infection consists of acute episodes with remissions.

Fevers, Trench
An intermittent fever characterized by intervals of chills, fever, and splenomegaly each of which may last as long as 40 hours. It is caused by BARTONELLA QUINTANA and transmitted by the human louse.

Fevers, Tsutsugamushi
An acute infectious disease caused by ORIENTIA TSUTSUGAMUSHI. It is limited to eastern and southeastern Asia, India, northern Australia, and the adjacent islands. Characteristics include the formation of a primary cutaneous lesion at the site of the bite of an infected mite, fever lasting about two weeks, and a maculopapular rash.

Fevers, Typhoid
An acute systemic febrile infection caused by SALMONELLA TYPHI.

Fevers, Undulant
Infection caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA mainly involving the reticuloendothelial system. This condition is characterized by fever, weakness, malaise, and weight loss.

Fevers, Uveoparotid
A manifestation of sarcoidosis marked by chronic inflammation of the parotid gland and the uvea.

Fevers, Viral Hemorrhagic
A group of viral diseases of diverse etiology but having many similar clinical characteristics; increased capillary permeability, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia are common to all. Hemorrhagic fevers are characterized by sudden onset, fever, headache, generalized myalgia, backache, conjunctivitis, and severe prostration, followed by various hemorrhagic symptoms. Hemorrhagic fever with kidney involvement is HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME.

Fevers, Yellow
An acute infectious disease primarily of the tropics, caused by a virus and transmitted to man by mosquitoes of the genera Aedes and Haemagogus.



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Fetal distress
When a fetus's life is believed to be in danger, most often because of too little oxygen. Signs of fetal distress -- including slowed heartbeat or absence of fetal movement -- call for immediate delivery of the baby.

Fetal monitoring
Tracking a fetus's heartbeat and a woman's uterine contractions during labor.

Fetal presentation
The position of the baby -- such as feet down (breech) or head down (vertex) -- inside a woman's uterus. About 96 percent of babies present in the vertex position; some who present in breech position can be turned around by a doctor before delivery begins.

Fetal-maternal exchange
The transfer of oxygen and nutrients from the mother to the baby and thetransfer of waste from the baby to the mother.

Fetoscopy
A prenatal diagnostic procedure in which a doctor inserts a laparoscope (a small viewing instrument) through a small incision in a pregnant woman's abdomen and uterine wall to look for any abnormalities in the fetus. Carries a 5percent risk of miscarriage or preterm labor.

Fever

Fine motor skills
The muscle control required to make small, precise movements, such as picking up a raisin or pushing a button.

Floppy infant syndrome
Limp, slack muscles in an infant often caused by neuromuscular disease (Werdnig-Hoffman disease, myasthenia gravis, myotonic dystrophy, or muscular dystrophy). In a child who is otherwise healthy and meeting normal developmental milestones, hypotonia can mean simply low muscle tone and increased flexibility or laxity of ligaments; in one who is severely ill it can mean an inability to sit up, crawl, walk, eat correctly, etc.

Follicle stimulating hormone
A hormone produced by the pituitary gland that stimulates the growth of eggs in the ovaries.

Follicles
Each month several of these small egg-containing cavities develop on the ovary of an ovulating woman. Each cavity contains a single immature egg; ovulation occurs when a follicle (or sometimes more than one) ruptures and releases an egg.

Fontanel
The soft spots on a baby's head that, during birth, enable the soft bony plates of the skull to flex, allowing the head to pass through the birth canal. Fontanels are completely hardened by a child's second birthday.

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