Exercise
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  Exercise



Exercise

   Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.

RELATED TERMS
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HEALTH
The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.

Contrast
"Short for ""contrast media."" Contrast media are X-ray dyes used to provide contrast, for example, between blood vessels and other tissue."

EXERTION
Expenditure of energy by skeletal muscles. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of oxygen consumption, heat produced, or heart rate. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.

Expenditure
The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Exercise ECG
Monitoring the electrical activity of the heart muscles while the heart is under stress, usually induced by the subject walking on a treadmill.

Exercise Induced Asthma
Asthma attacks following a period of exercise. Usually the induced attack is short-lived and regresses spontaneously. The magnitude of postexertional airway obstruction is strongly influenced by the environment in which exercise is performed (i.e. inhalation of cold air during physical exertion markedly augments the severity of the airway obstruction; conversely, warm humid air blunts or abolishes it).

Exercise Induced Bronchospasm
Asthma attacks following a period of exercise. Usually the induced attack is short-lived and regresses spontaneously. The magnitude of postexertional airway obstruction is strongly influenced by the environment in which exercise is performed (i.e. inhalation of cold air during physical exertion markedly augments the severity of the airway obstruction; conversely, warm humid air blunts or abolishes it).

Exercise Movement Technics
Physical activities which people can do to benefit their health.

Exercise Movement Techniques
Physical activities which people can do to benefit their health.

Exercise Stress Test
A test used to provide information about how the heart responds to stress. It usually involves walking on a treadmill or pedaling a stationary bike at increasing levels of difficulty, while the electrocardiogram, heart rate and blood pressure are monitored. When one is not able to do activity, medications may be used to "stress" the heart. This is called a pharmacological stress test.

Exercise test
A test (sometimes called the treadmill test or exercise treadmill test) in which a continuous electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) recording of the heart is made as the patient performs increasing levels of exercise on the treadmill which is tilted to produce the effect of going up a small hill. The patient can stop the test at any time, if necessary. Afterwards the patient has heart and blood pressure checked. There is very little risk in taking the test in healthy persons -- no more than if a person walks fast or jogs up a big hill. Medical professionals should be present in case something unusual happens during the test. The exercise test screens for the presence of narrowed coronary arteries that can limit the supply of oxygenated blood to the heart muscle during exercise. The test also detects abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias).

Exercise Test
Controlled physical activity, more strenuous than at rest, which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used. The intensity of exercise is often graded, using criteria such as rate of work done, oxygen consumption, and heart rate.

Exercise Tests
Controlled physical activity, more strenuous than at rest, which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used. The intensity of exercise is often graded, using criteria such as rate of work done, oxygen consumption, and heart rate.

Exercise Therapies
Motion of the body or its parts to relieve symptoms or to improve function, leading to PHYSICAL FITNESS, but not PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING.

Exercise Therapy
Motion of the body or its parts to relieve symptoms or to improve function, leading to PHYSICAL FITNESS, but not PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING.

Exercise Tolerance
The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.

Exercise treadmill
Exercise on a treadmill, a machine with a moving strip on which one walks without moving forward. A treadmill was originally a wide wheel turned by the weight of people climbing on steps around its edge, used in the past to provide power for machines or as a punishment in prisons.

Exercise treadmill test
A test (sometimes simply called a treadmill test or exercise test) in which a continuous electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) recording of the heart is made as the patient performs increasing levels of exercise on the treadmill which is tilted to produce the effect of going up a small hill. The patient can stop the test at any time, if necessary. Afterwards the patient has heart and blood pressure checked.

Exercise, Aerobic
Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.

Exercise, Breathing
Therapeutic exercises aimed to deepen inspiration or expiration or even to alter the rate and rhythm of respiration.

Exercise, isometric
Exercise involving muscular contractions without movement of the involved parts of the body. Isometric exercise is one method of muscular exercise. In contrast, isotonic exercise occurs when a contracting muscle shortens against a constant load, as when lifting a weight.

Exercise, Isometric
Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.

Exercise, isotonic
Exercise when a contracting muscle shortens against a constant load, as when lifting a weight. Isometric exercise is one method of muscular exercise. In contrast, isotonic exercise is when muscular contractions occur without movement of the involved parts of the body.

Exercise, passive
Movement of the body, usually of the limbs, without effort by the patient. The patient is passive.

Exercise, Physical
Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.

Exercise-induced asthma
Asthma that is "triggered" by vigorous physical activity. Exercise-induced asthma tends particularly to affect children and young adults (because of their high level of physical activity) but can occur at any age.

Exercise-Induced Asthma
Asthma attacks following a period of exercise. Usually the induced attack is short-lived and regresses spontaneously. The magnitude of postexertional airway obstruction is strongly influenced by the environment in which exercise is performed (i.e. inhalation of cold air during physical exertion markedly augments the severity of the airway obstruction; conversely, warm humid air blunts or abolishes it).

Exercise-Induced Asthmas
Asthma attacks following a period of exercise. Usually the induced attack is short-lived and regresses spontaneously. The magnitude of postexertional airway obstruction is strongly influenced by the environment in which exercise is performed (i.e. inhalation of cold air during physical exertion markedly augments the severity of the airway obstruction; conversely, warm humid air blunts or abolishes it).

Exercise-induced bronchospasm
Also called exercise- induced asthma, this is asthma that is triggered by vigorous physical activity. Exercise-induced asthma tends particularly to affect children and young adults (because of their high level of physical activity) but can occur at any age.

Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm
Asthma attacks following a period of exercise. Usually the induced attack is short-lived and regresses spontaneously. The magnitude of postexertional airway obstruction is strongly influenced by the environment in which exercise is performed (i.e. inhalation of cold air during physical exertion markedly augments the severity of the airway obstruction; conversely, warm humid air blunts or abolishes it).

Exercise-Induced Bronchospasms
Asthma attacks following a period of exercise. Usually the induced attack is short-lived and regresses spontaneously. The magnitude of postexertional airway obstruction is strongly influenced by the environment in which exercise is performed (i.e. inhalation of cold air during physical exertion markedly augments the severity of the airway obstruction; conversely, warm humid air blunts or abolishes it).

Exercises
Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.

Exercises, Aerobic
Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.

Exercises, Isometric
Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.

Exercises, Physical
Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.

Exertion
Expenditure of energy by skeletal muscles. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of oxygen consumption, heat produced, or heart rate. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.

Exertional Headache, Benign
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Exertional Headaches, Benign
Common conditions characterized by persistent or recurrent headaches (see HEADACHE). Headache syndrome classification systems may be based on etiology (e.g., VASCULAR HEADACHE, post-traumatic headaches, etc.), temporal pattern (e.g., CLUSTER HEADACHE, paroxysmal hemicrania, etc.), and precipitating factors (e.g., cough headache).

Exertions
Expenditure of energy by skeletal muscles. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of oxygen consumption, heat produced, or heart rate. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Excisions, Prophage
The mechanism by which latent viruses, such as genetically transmitted tumor viruses or prophages of lysogenic bacteria, are induced to replicate and are released as infectious viruses. It may be effected by various endogenous and exogenous stimuli, including B-cell lipopolysaccharides, glucocorticoid hormones, halogenated pyrimidines, ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and superinfecting viruses.

Excitement, Psychomotor
A feeling of restlessness associated with increased motor activity. This may occur as a manifestation of nervous system drug toxicity or other conditions.

Excitotoxins
Toxic substances from microorganisms, plants or animals that interfere with the functions of the nervous system. Most venoms contain neurotoxic substances. Myotoxins are included in this concept.

Excitatory Amino Acid Receptors
Cell-surface proteins that bind glutamate and trigger changes which influence the behavior of cells. Glutamate receptors include ionotropic receptors (AMPA, kainate, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors), which directly control ion channels, and metabotropic receptors which act through second messenger systems. Glutamate receptors are the most common mediators of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. They have also been implicated in the mechanisms of memory and of many diseases.

Exercise Induced Asthma
Asthma attacks following a period of exercise. Usually the induced attack is short-lived and regresses spontaneously. The magnitude of postexertional airway obstruction is strongly influenced by the environment in which exercise is performed (i.e. inhalation of cold air during physical exertion markedly augments the severity of the airway obstruction; conversely, warm humid air blunts or abolishes it).

Exercise

Exenteration, Pelvic
Removal of all of the organs and adjacent structures of the pelvis. It is usually performed to surgically remove cancer involving the bladder, uterine cervix, or rectum. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Exemptions, Tax
Status not subject to taxation; as the income of a philanthropic organization. Tax-exempt organizations may also qualify to receive tax-deductible donations if they are considered to be nonprofit corporations under Section 501(c)3 of the United States Internal Revenue Code.

Exclusion Chromatography
Chromatography on non-ionic gels without regard to the mechanism of solute discrimination.

Exercise, Breathing
Therapeutic exercises aimed to deepen inspiration or expiration or even to alter the rate and rhythm of respiration.

Exercise Tolerance
The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.

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