Excision
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  Excision



Excision

   1. Surgical removal, as in the excision of a tumor. 2. The removal as if by surgery, as in base excision repair.

RELATED TERMS
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Excision
1. Surgical removal, as in the excision of a tumor. 2. The removal as if by surgery, as in base excision repair.

Tumor
Overgrowth of tissue.

Surgery
Treating diseases or other medical conditions by operating on a patient to remove or repair parts of the body.

Base
A chemical compound that either donates hydroxide ions or absorbs hydrogen ions when dissolved in water. Bases and acids are referred to as opposites because the effect of an acid is to increase the hydronium ion concentration in water, whereas bases reduce this concentration. Arrhenius bases are water-soluble and always have a pH greater than 7 in solution.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Excimer laser
A laser that emits very concentrated light in the ultraviolet (UV) region of the spectrum.

Excimer Laser Angioplasties
Techniques using laser energy in combination with a balloon catheter to perform angioplasty. These procedures can take several forms including: a) laser fiber delivering the energy while the inflated balloon centers the fiber and occludes the blood flow; b) balloon angioplasty immediately following laser angioplasty; or c) laser energy transmitted through angioplasty balloons that contain an internal fiber.

Excimer Laser Angioplasty
Techniques using laser energy in combination with a balloon catheter to perform angioplasty. These procedures can take several forms including: a) laser fiber delivering the energy while the inflated balloon centers the fiber and occludes the blood flow; b) balloon angioplasty immediately following laser angioplasty; or c) laser energy transmitted through angioplasty balloons that contain an internal fiber.

Excimer Laser Keratectomies
A type of refractive surgery of the cornea to correct myopia and astigmatism, using an excimer laser. An excimer laser is a laser containing a noble gas, such as helium or neon, which is based on a transition between an excited state in which a metastable bond exists between two gas atoms and a rapidly dissociating ground state. The extremely precise laser light reshapes the surface of the cornea without making an incision. This procedure can reduce much higher degrees of myopia than radial keratotomy (KERATOTOMY, RADIAL), although it generally takes longer for vision to clear. (From In Focus 1994;1(2):3 and McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p675)

Excimer Laser Keratectomy
A type of refractive surgery of the cornea to correct myopia and astigmatism, using an excimer laser. An excimer laser is a laser containing a noble gas, such as helium or neon, which is based on a transition between an excited state in which a metastable bond exists between two gas atoms and a rapidly dissociating ground state. The extremely precise laser light reshapes the surface of the cornea without making an incision. This procedure can reduce much higher degrees of myopia than radial keratotomy (KERATOTOMY, RADIAL), although it generally takes longer for vision to clear. (From In Focus 1994;1(2):3 and McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p675)

Excipients
Usually inert substances added to a prescription in order to provide suitable consistency to the dosage form; a binder, matrix, base or diluent in pills, tablets, creams, salves, etc.

Excise
To remove by cutting.

Excision Mastectomies, Local
Removal of only enough breast tissue to ensure that the margins of the resected surgical specimen are free of tumor.

Excision Mastectomy, Local
Removal of only enough breast tissue to ensure that the margins of the resected surgical specimen are free of tumor.

Excision Repair
The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as ""dark repair"" because they do not require light.

Excision Repair, Nucleotide
The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as ""dark repair"" because they do not require light.

Excision Repairs
The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as ""dark repair"" because they do not require light.

Excision Repairs, Nucleotide
The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as ""dark repair"" because they do not require light.

Excision, Lymph Node
Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)

Excision, Prophage
The mechanism by which latent viruses, such as genetically transmitted tumor viruses or prophages of lysogenic bacteria, are induced to replicate and are released as infectious viruses. It may be effected by various endogenous and exogenous stimuli, including B-cell lipopolysaccharides, glucocorticoid hormones, halogenated pyrimidines, ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and superinfecting viruses.

Excision, Tubal
Surgical interruption of the fallopian tube during laparotomy or in the context of pelvioscopy.

Excisional
Pertaining to the act of excision, of removal by surgery. An excisional biopsy is one in which the lesion is removed by the biopsy.

Excisional biopsy
A biopsy in which an entire biopsy in which an entire lesion, is removed. A excisional biopsy is in contrast to an incisional biopsy in which only a sample of tissue is cut into (incised) and removed.

Excisions, Lymph Node
Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)

Excisions, Prophage
The mechanism by which latent viruses, such as genetically transmitted tumor viruses or prophages of lysogenic bacteria, are induced to replicate and are released as infectious viruses. It may be effected by various endogenous and exogenous stimuli, including B-cell lipopolysaccharides, glucocorticoid hormones, halogenated pyrimidines, ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and superinfecting viruses.

Excisions, Tubal
Surgical interruption of the fallopian tube during laparotomy or in the context of pelvioscopy.

Excitatory Amino Acid
Endogenous amino acids released by neurons as excitatory neurotransmitters. Glutamic acid is the most common excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Aspartic acid has been regarded as an excitatory transmitter for many years, but the extent of its role as a transmitter is unclear.

Excitatory Amino Acid Agents
Drugs used for their actions on any aspect of excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter systems. Included are drugs that act on excitatory amino acid receptors, affect the life cycle of excitatory amino acid transmitters, or affect the survival of neurons using excitatory amino acids.

Excitatory Amino Acid Agonist
Drugs that bind to and activate excitatory amino acid receptors.

Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists
Drugs that bind to and activate excitatory amino acid receptors.

Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists
Drugs that bind to but do not activate excitatory amino acid receptors, thereby blocking the actions of agonists.

Excitatory Amino Acid Receptor
Cell-surface proteins that bind glutamate and trigger changes which influence the behavior of cells. Glutamate receptors include ionotropic receptors (AMPA, kainate, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors), which directly control ion channels, and metabotropic receptors which act through second messenger systems. Glutamate receptors are the most common mediators of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. They have also been implicated in the mechanisms of memory and of many diseases.

Excitatory Amino Acid Receptors
Cell-surface proteins that bind glutamate and trigger changes which influence the behavior of cells. Glutamate receptors include ionotropic receptors (AMPA, kainate, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors), which directly control ion channels, and metabotropic receptors which act through second messenger systems. Glutamate receptors are the most common mediators of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. They have also been implicated in the mechanisms of memory and of many diseases.

Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 1
A high affinity glutamate/aspartate transporter found in astrocytes, heart, skeletal muscle and placenta. Its action can be coupled to the co-transport of potassium, sodium or hydrogen ions.

Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2
A high affinity glutamate/aspartate transporter found in ASTROCYTES and in the liver. It action can be coupled to the co-transport of potassium, sodium or hydrogen ions.

Excitatory Amino Acids
Endogenous amino acids released by neurons as excitatory neurotransmitters. Glutamic acid is the most common excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Aspartic acid has been regarded as an excitatory transmitter for many years, but the extent of its role as a transmitter is unclear.

Excitatory Neurotoxins
Toxic substances from microorganisms, plants or animals that interfere with the functions of the nervous system. Most venoms contain neurotoxic substances. Myotoxins are included in this concept.

Excitatory Postsynaptic Potential
The change in potential produced in the membrane of the next neuron when an impulse which has an excitatory influence arrives at the synapse; it is a local change in the direction of depolarization; summation of these potentials can lead to discharge of an impulse by the neuron. (Stedman, 26th ed)

Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials
The change in potential produced in the membrane of the next neuron when an impulse which has an excitatory influence arrives at the synapse; it is a local change in the direction of depolarization; summation of these potentials can lead to discharge of an impulse by the neuron. (Stedman, 26th ed)

Excitement phase
The first of the four sexual phases delineated by Masters and Johnson.

Excitement, Psychomotor
A feeling of restlessness associated with increased motor activity. This may occur as a manifestation of nervous system drug toxicity or other conditions.

Excitotoxin
Toxic substances from microorganisms, plants or animals that interfere with the functions of the nervous system. Most venoms contain neurotoxic substances. Myotoxins are included in this concept.

Excitotoxins
Toxic substances from microorganisms, plants or animals that interfere with the functions of the nervous system. Most venoms contain neurotoxic substances. Myotoxins are included in this concept.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Excess iron
Iron overload can damage the heart, liver, gonads and other organs. Iron overload is a particular risk for: People with certain genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis; and People receiving repeated blood transfusions.

Excess selenium
Too much selenium (selenosis) which may cause reversible balding and brittle nails, give a garlic odor to the breath, and cause intestinal distress, weakness and slowed mental functioning. People who chronically consume more than the tolerable upper intake level (UL) of selenium -- in adults, the UL is 400 micrograms per day of selenium -- are at risk for developing selenosis.

Excessive daytime sleepiness
A neurological disorder in which there is a sudden recurrent uncontrollable compulsion to sleep. Excessive daytime sleepiness is also known as narcolepsy.

Exchange, gas
The primary function of the lungs involving the transfer of oxygen from inhaled air into the blood and the transfer of carbon dioxide from the blood into the exhaled air.

Excimer laser
A laser that emits very concentrated light in the ultraviolet (UV) region of the spectrum.

Excision

Excisional
Pertaining to the act of excision, of removal by surgery. An excisional biopsy is one in which the lesion is removed by the biopsy.

Excisional biopsy
A biopsy in which an entire biopsy in which an entire lesion, is removed. A excisional biopsy is in contrast to an incisional biopsy in which only a sample of tissue is cut into (incised) and removed.

Exclamation point hair
Exclamation point hair is a key diagnostic finding in a disorder called alopecia areata. Alopecia areata is patchy baldness (alopecia means baldness and areata means occurring in patches) which typically begins with patchy hair loss on the scalp and sometimes progresses to complete baldness and even loss of body hair. The hair loss tends to be rather rapid and asymmetrical and is different than male pattern baldness.Alopecia areata affects both males and females. It tends to occur most often in children and young adults but older individuals can also be affected.The most common pattern of alopecia areata is one or more spots of hair loss on the scalp. There is also a form with more generalized thinning. When all of the scalp hair is lost, it is called alopecia totalis. Loss of all of the hairs on the body is called alopecia universalis.

Excrescence
An abnormal outgrowth as, for example, a wart.

Exemestane
An oral antiestrogen. Exemestane inhibits the enzyme aromatase in the adrenal glands that produces the estrogens (estradiol and estrone) and thereby lowers their levels.

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