Event
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  Event



Event

   A set of outcomes. Cardiovascular events might include a heart attack and gastrointestinal events a GI bleed. The use of the term "event" in medicine comes from probability theory.

RELATED TERMS
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Cardiovascular
Of, relating to, or involving the heart and the blood vessels.

Heart
The hollow, muscular organ responsible for pumping blood through the circulatory system.

Gastrointestinal
Having to do with the stomach and intestines.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Evening primrose oil
A natural source of essential fatty acids (EFOs). Evening primrose oil contains a higher level of arachnoidic acid than some other EFO sources, so people with seizure disorders may wish to avoid its use.

Event Free Survival
Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.

Event Related Potentials
The electric response evoked in the central nervous system by stimulation of sensory receptors or some point on the sensory pathway leading from the receptor to the cortex. The evoked stimulus can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), or visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), although other modalities have been reported. Event-related potentials is sometimes used synonymously with evoked potentials but is often associated with the execution of a motor, cognitive, or psychophysiological task, as well as with the response to a stimulus.

Event Related Potentials, P300
A late-appearing component of the event-related potential. P stands for positive voltage potential and 300 represents 300 millisecond poststimulus. Its amplitude increases with unpredictable, unlikely, or highly significant stimuli and thereby constitutes an index of mental activity. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 6th ed)

Event, Sentinel Health
Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort, geographic area, population subgroup, etc. to estimate trends in larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)

Event, Solar Particle
Any type of variation in the appearance of energy output of the sun. (NASA Thesaurus, 1994)

Event, Special
Occasions to commemorate an event or occasions designated for a specific purpose.

Event-Free Survival
Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.

Event-Free Survivals
Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.

Event-Related Potential
The electric response evoked in the central nervous system by stimulation of sensory receptors or some point on the sensory pathway leading from the receptor to the cortex. The evoked stimulus can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), or visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), although other modalities have been reported. Event-related potentials is sometimes used synonymously with evoked potentials but is often associated with the execution of a motor, cognitive, or psychophysiological task, as well as with the response to a stimulus.

Event-Related Potential, P300
A late-appearing component of the event-related potential. P stands for positive voltage potential and 300 represents 300 millisecond poststimulus. Its amplitude increases with unpredictable, unlikely, or highly significant stimuli and thereby constitutes an index of mental activity. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 6th ed)

Event-Related Potentials
The electric response evoked in the central nervous system by stimulation of sensory receptors or some point on the sensory pathway leading from the receptor to the cortex. The evoked stimulus can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), or visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), although other modalities have been reported. Event-related potentials is sometimes used synonymously with evoked potentials but is often associated with the execution of a motor, cognitive, or psychophysiological task, as well as with the response to a stimulus.

Event-Related Potentials, P300
A late-appearing component of the event-related potential. P stands for positive voltage potential and 300 represents 300 millisecond poststimulus. Its amplitude increases with unpredictable, unlikely, or highly significant stimuli and thereby constitutes an index of mental activity. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 6th ed)

Eventration, Diaphragmatic
Elevation of the dome of the diaphragm, usually the result of paralysis of a phrenic nerve. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Eventrations, Diaphragmatic
Elevation of the dome of the diaphragm, usually the result of paralysis of a phrenic nerve. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Events, Sentinel Health
Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort, geographic area, population subgroup, etc. to estimate trends in larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)

Events, Solar Particle
Any type of variation in the appearance of energy output of the sun. (NASA Thesaurus, 1994)

Events, Special
Occasions to commemorate an event or occasions designated for a specific purpose.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Euthanasia
The most commonly understood meaning of euthanasia today is more than the old dictionary definition of dying well -- a good and easy death. It refers, for example, to the situation when a doctor induces the death with a lethal injection, of a patient who is suffering unrelievably and has persistently requested the doctor to do so. Suicide, whether irrational or rational, for unrelated reasons is not euthanasia. Nor is the forced killing of another person.

Euthanasia, active
The active acceleration of a "good" death by use of drugs etc, whether by oneself or with the aid of a doctor. Today the most commonly understood meaning of euthanasia is more than this old dictionary definition of dying well a good and easy death. Euthanasia refers, for example, to the situation when a doctor induces the death with a lethal injection, of a patient who is suffering without relief and has persistently requested the doctor to do so.Suicide, whether irrational or rational, for unrelated reasons is not euthanasia. Nor is the forced killing of another person.

Euthyroid
The state of having normal thyroid gland function. As opposed to hyperthyroid (overactive thyroid) and hypothyroid (underactive thyroid).

EVAR
Endovascular aneurysm repair. A procedure to repair an aneurysm of the aorta. In EVAR a stent is placed in the aneurysmal area of the aorta. The procedure is similar to the placement of a stent in a coronary artery after angioplasty. An aortic aneurysm is a ballooning or widening of the aorta, the largest artery in the body. The aneurysm weakens the wall of the aorta and can end in the aorta rupturing with catastrophic consequences. As the diameter of the aneurysm increases, the chances of the aneurysm rupturing rise dramatically. Large aortic aneurysms are very perilous and can be silent, with few or no symptoms. Men over 60 are particularly at risk to have an aortic aneurysm.

Evening primrose oil
A natural source of essential fatty acids (EFOs). Evening primrose oil contains a higher level of arachnoidic acid than some other EFO sources, so people with seizure disorders may wish to avoid its use.

Event

Evert
To turn outward or turn inside out. To evert the foot is to move its forepart away from the midline of the body. To evert a hollow organ is to turn it inside out.

Evertor
A muscle that turns a part toward the outside. To evert is to turn outward or turn inside out.

Evidence-based medicine
The judicious use of the best current evidence in making decisions about the care of the individual patient. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is mean to integrate clinical expertise with the best available research evidence and patient values.

Evolution
The continuing process of change, especially in reference to natural selection.

Evolution, biologic
Biologic evolution was contrasted with cultural (social) evolution in 1968 by A.G. Motulsky who pointed out that biologic evolution is mediated by genes, shows a slow rate of change, employs random variation (mutations) and selection as agents of change, new variants are often harmful, these new variants are transmitted from parents to offspring, the mode of transmission is simple, complexity is achieved by the rare formation of new genes by chromosome duplication, biologic evolution occurs with all forms of life, and the biology of humans requires cultural evolution.

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