Erythrocytes
Health dictionary
Untitled Document
Search :      

Art dictionary
Financial dictionary
Hollywood dictionary
Insurance dictionary
Literature dictionary
Real Estate dictionary
Tourism dictionary

 
  Erythrocytes



Erythrocytes

   Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing hemoglobin whose function is to transport oxygen.

RELATED TERMS
--------------------------------------

Blood
The life-maintaining fluid which is made up of plasma, red blood cells (erythrocytes), white blood cells (leukocytes), and platelets; blood circulates through the body's heart, arteries, veins, and capillaries; it carries away waste matter and carbon dioxide, and brings nourishment, electrolytes, hormones, vitamins, antibodies, heat, and oxygen to the tissues.

Erythrocytes
Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing hemoglobin whose function is to transport oxygen.

Hemoglobin
Hemoglobin is a substance contained within the red blood cells and is responsible for their color. It has the unique property of combining reversibly with oxygen and is the medium by which oxygen is transported within the body. It takes up oxygen as blood passes through the lungs and releases it as blood passes through the tissues.

Oxygen
A chemical element essential for sustaining life.



SIMILAR TERMS
--------------------------------------

Erythema
Redness of the skin.

Erythema chronicum migrans
Spreading annular rash which appears at the site of tick-bite in Lyme disease.

Erythema Chronicum Migrans
A deep type of gyrate erythema that follows a bite by an ixodid tick; it is a stage-1 manifestation of LYME DISEASE. The site of the bite is characterized by a red papule that expands peripherally as a nonscaling, palpable band that clears centrally. This condition is often associated with systemic symptoms such as chills, fever, headache, malaise, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, backache, and stiff neck.

Erythema dose
The amount of radiation which, applied to the skin, makes it turn temporarily red (erythematous).

Erythema Induratum
A type of panniculitis characterized histologically by the presence of granulomas, vasculitis, and necrosis. It is traditionally considered to be the tuberculous counterpart of nodular vasculitis, but is now known to occur without tuberculous precedent. It is seen most commonly in adolescent and menopausal women, is initiated or exacerbated by cold weather, and typically presents as one or more recurrent erythrocyanotic nodules or plaques on the calves. The nodules may progress to form indurations, ulcerations, and scars.

Erythema infectiosum
Last of five childhood diseases to be discovered, including scarlet fever, measles, rubella, and roseola.Mild infection characterized by fever and a bright red rash on the cheeks.

Erythema Infectiosum
Contagious infection with human B19 Parvovirus most commonly seen in school age children and characterized by fever, headache, and rashes of the face, trunk, and extremities. It is often confused with rubella.

Erythema marginatum
Rash occurring in rheumatic fever.

Erythema multiforme
An eruption of flat or raised spots of skin as a result of hypersensitivity to certain drugs or allergies.

Erythema nodosum
Red tender subcutaneous swellings, usually found on the lower limbs. Often associated with an asymmetrical, predominantly large joint arthropathy. Sarcoidosis, streptococcal infection and tuberculosis are the commonest triggers, but there are a number of others.

Erythema Nodosum
An erythematous eruption commonly associated with drug reactions or infection and characterized by inflammatory nodules that are usually tender, multiple, and bilateral. These nodules are located predominantly on the shins with less common occurrence on the thighs and forearms. They undergo characteristic color changes ending in temporary bruise-like areas. This condition usually subsides in 3-6 weeks without scarring or atrophy.

Erythema, Acrodynic
A condition seen primarily in childhood, most often resulting from chronic exposure to MERCURY COMPOUNDS which may result in ENCEPHALOPATHY and POLYNEUROPATHY. Clinical features include pain, swelling and pinkish discoloration of the fingers and toes, weakness in the extremities, extreme irritability, HYPERESTHESIA, and alterations in level of consciousness. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p603)

Erythemas
Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.

Erythematous
Redness of the skin caused by congestion of the capillaries, often due to inflammation or infection.

Erythermalgia
Disease marked by paroxysmal, bilateral vasodilatation, particularly of the extremities, with burning pain, and increased skin temperature and redness.

Erythermalgias
Disease marked by paroxysmal, bilateral vasodilatation, particularly of the extremities, with burning pain, and increased skin temperature and redness.

Erythra-derm
Erythra-derm is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): erythromycin.

Erythrasma
A chronic superficial slowly spreading skin infection, especially in the folds of the body and webs between the toes, caused by a bacterium called Corynebacterium minutissimum. Erythrasma most often affects adults, especially those with diabetes, and people in the tropics.

Erythremia
A myeloproliferative disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by abnormal proliferation of all hematopoietic bone marrow elements and an absolute increase in red cell mass and total blood volume, associated frequently with splenomegaly, leukocytosis, and thrombocythemia. Hematopoiesis is also reactive in extramedullary sites (liver and spleen). In time myelofibrosis occurs.

Erythremias
A myeloproliferative disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by abnormal proliferation of all hematopoietic bone marrow elements and an absolute increase in red cell mass and total blood volume, associated frequently with splenomegaly, leukocytosis, and thrombocythemia. Hematopoiesis is also reactive in extramedullary sites (liver and spleen). In time myelofibrosis occurs.

Erythremic Myeloses
A myeloproliferative disorder characterized by neoplastic proliferation of erythroblastic and myeloblastic elements with atypical erythroblasts and myeloblasts in the peripheral blood.

Erythremic Myelosis
A myeloproliferative disorder characterized by neoplastic proliferation of erythroblastic and myeloblastic elements with atypical erythroblasts and myeloblasts in the peripheral blood.

Erythrina
A genus of leguminous shrubs or trees, mainly tropical, yielding certain alkaloids, lectins, and other useful compounds.

Erythrina cristagalli
A genus of leguminous shrubs or trees, mainly tropical, yielding certain alkaloids, lectins, and other useful compounds.

Erythritol
A four-carbon sugar that is found in algae, fungi, and lichens. It is twice as sweet as sucrose and can be used as a coronary vasodilator.

Erythrityl Tetranitrate
A vasodilator with general properties similar to NITROGLYCERIN. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1020)

Erythro-statin
Erythro-statin is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): erythromycin.

Erythroblast
Immature, nucleated erythrocytes occupying the stage of ERYTHROPOIESIS that follows formation of ERYTHROID PROGENITOR CELLS and precedes formation of RETICULOCYTES. Popularly called normoblasts.

Erythroblastic Leukemia, Acute
A myeloproliferative disorder characterized by neoplastic proliferation of erythroblastic and myeloblastic elements with atypical erythroblasts and myeloblasts in the peripheral blood.

Erythroblastic Leukemias, Acute
A myeloproliferative disorder characterized by neoplastic proliferation of erythroblastic and myeloblastic elements with atypical erythroblasts and myeloblasts in the peripheral blood.

Erythroblastoses, Fetal
Hemolytic anemia of the fetus or newborn infant, caused by the transplacental transmission of maternally formed antibody, usually secondary to an incompatibility between the blood group of the mother and that of her offspring. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Erythroblastosis Virus, Avian
A species of ALPHARETROVIRUS causing progressive anemia and weakness in domestic and wild fowl.

Erythroblastosis Viruses, Avian
A species of ALPHARETROVIRUS causing progressive anemia and weakness in domestic and wild fowl.

Erythroblastosis, Fetal
Hemolytic anemia of the fetus or newborn infant, caused by the transplacental transmission of maternally formed antibody, usually secondary to an incompatibility between the blood group of the mother and that of her offspring. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Erythroblasts
Immature, nucleated erythrocytes occupying the stage of ERYTHROPOIESIS that follows formation of ERYTHROID PROGENITOR CELLS and precedes formation of RETICULOCYTES. Popularly called normoblasts.

Erythrocebus
a genus of Old World monkeys of the family CERCOPITHECINAE that inhabit the forests and savannas of Africa. It contains only one species, ERYTHROCEBUS PATAS, also known as the patas monkey or red monkey.

Erythrocebus pata
A species of the genus ERYTHROCEBUS, subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE. It inhabits the flat open arid country of Africa. It is also known as the patas monkey or the red monkey.

Erythrocebus patas
A species of the genus ERYTHROCEBUS, subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE. It inhabits the flat open arid country of Africa. It is also known as the patas monkey or the red monkey.

Erythrocin
Erythrocin is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): erythromycin lactobionate.

Erythrocin stearate
Erythrocin stearate is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): erythromycin stearate.

Erythrocruorins
High molecular weight (1,500,000 to 3,000,000) hemoglobins found in the plasma of many polychete and oligochete annelid worms and various mollusks. They bind one mole of oxygen per heme and function as oxygen carriers.

Erythrocuprein
An oxidoreductase that catalyzes the reaction between superoxide anions and hydrogen to yield molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme protects the cell against dangerous levels of superoxide. EC 1.15.1.1.

Erythrocyanosis
Reddish discoloration and swelling of the limbs in response to cold. Erythrocyanosis is particularly common in children and more common in women than men.

Erythrocyte
An erythrocyte is more commonly known as a red blood cell, which is the most numerous type of blood cell. Erythrocytes contain the red pigment hemoglobin and are responsible for oxygen transport. In humans, the number of erythrocytes in the blood varies between 4.5 and 5.5 million per cubic millimeter. They survive for about four months and are then destroyed in the spleen and liver.

Erythrocyte (red blood cell, red cell, red corpuscle)
Red blood cell that delivers oxygen to tissues and removes carbon dioxide and other waste products.

Erythrocyte Aggregation
Aggregation of erythrocytes probably resulting from changes in the negative surface charge (zeta potential) of the cells caused by the dielectric effect of proteins in the surrounding plasma, especially asymmetric macromolecules like fibrinogen and gamma-globulin.

Erythrocyte Aggregation, Intravascular
The massing or clumping of erythrocytes in intact blood vessels in response to injury or in certain diseases, interfering with adequate blood flow. It is also called sludging of blood and intravascular agglutination. (Dorland, 24th ed)

Erythrocyte Aggregations
Aggregation of erythrocytes probably resulting from changes in the negative surface charge (zeta potential) of the cells caused by the dielectric effect of proteins in the surrounding plasma, especially asymmetric macromolecules like fibrinogen and gamma-globulin.

Erythrocyte Aggregations, Intravascular
The massing or clumping of erythrocytes in intact blood vessels in response to injury or in certain diseases, interfering with adequate blood flow. It is also called sludging of blood and intravascular agglutination. (Dorland, 24th ed)

Erythrocyte Aging
Senescence of the red blood cell. Lacking the organelles that make protein synthesis possible, the mature erythrocyte is incapable of self-repair, reproduction, and carrying out certain functions performed by other cells. This limits the average life span of an erythrocyte to 120 days.

Erythrocyte Anion Exchanger
A ubiquitous membrane transport protein found in the plasma membrane of diverse cell types and tissues, and in nuclear, mitochondrial, and Golgi membranes. It is the major integral transmembrane protein of the erythrocyte plasma membrane, comprising 25% of the total membrane protein. It exists as a dimer and performs the important function of allowing the efficient transport of bicarbonate across erythrocyte cell membranes in exchange for chloride ion.

Erythrocyte Anion Transport Protein
A ubiquitous membrane transport protein found in the plasma membrane of diverse cell types and tissues, and in nuclear, mitochondrial, and Golgi membranes. It is the major integral transmembrane protein of the erythrocyte plasma membrane, comprising 25% of the total membrane protein. It exists as a dimer and performs the important function of allowing the efficient transport of bicarbonate across erythrocyte cell membranes in exchange for chloride ion.

Erythrocyte Aplasia
Suppression of erythropoiesis with little or no abnormality of leukocyte or platelet production.

Erythrocyte Aplasias
Suppression of erythropoiesis with little or no abnormality of leukocyte or platelet production.

Erythrocyte band 4.5 Protein
Membrane transport proteins which bind glucose and sodium ions and enter the cell together. The sodium ions are then pumped out of the cell by a sodium potassium ATPase. The rate and extent of the sugar transport depends on the sodium ion concentration. Inhibitors of the monosaccharide transport system are phlorizin, cytochalasin B, and inhibitors of the sodium potassium ATPase system. Insulin increases the rate of monosaccharide transport across the membrane into the cell.

Erythrocyte Burst Promoting Factor
A multilineage cell growth factor secreted by lymphocytes, epithelial cells, and astrocytes which stimulates clonal proliferation and differentiation of various types of blood and tissue cells. Also called multi-CSF, it is considered one of the hematopoietic colony stimulating factors.

Erythrocyte Burst-Promoting Factor
A multilineage cell growth factor secreted by lymphocytes, epithelial cells, and astrocytes which stimulates clonal proliferation and differentiation of various types of blood and tissue cells. Also called multi-CSF, it is considered one of the hematopoietic colony stimulating factors.

Erythrocyte Count
A count of the number of red blood cells per unit volume in a sample of venous blood.

Erythrocyte Counts
A count of the number of red blood cells per unit volume in a sample of venous blood.

Erythrocyte Deformability
Ability of erythrocytes to change shape as they pass through narrow spaces, such as the microvasculature.

Erythrocyte Filterability
Ability of erythrocytes to change shape as they pass through narrow spaces, such as the microvasculature.

Erythrocyte Hemoglobin, Mean Cell
Quantification of size and cell hemoglobin content or concentration of the erythrocyte, usually derived from erythrocyte count, blood hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit. Includes the mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Use also for cell diameter and thickness.

Erythrocyte Inclusion
Pathologic inclusions occurring in erythrocytes.

Erythrocyte Inclusions
Pathologic inclusions occurring in erythrocytes.

Erythrocyte Index
Quantification of size and cell hemoglobin content or concentration of the erythrocyte, usually derived from erythrocyte count, blood hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit. Includes the mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Use also for cell diameter and thickness.

Erythrocyte Indexes
Quantification of size and cell hemoglobin content or concentration of the erythrocyte, usually derived from erythrocyte count, blood hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit. Includes the mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Use also for cell diameter and thickness.

Erythrocyte Indices
Quantification of size and cell hemoglobin content or concentration of the erythrocyte, usually derived from erythrocyte count, blood hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit. Includes the mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Use also for cell diameter and thickness.

Erythrocyte Lactate Transporter
A family of proteins involved in the transport of monocarboxylic acids such as LACTIC ACID and PYRUVIC ACID across cellular membranes.

Erythrocyte Lactate Transporters
A family of proteins involved in the transport of monocarboxylic acids such as LACTIC ACID and PYRUVIC ACID across cellular membranes.

Erythrocyte Membrane Anion Transport Protein
A ubiquitous membrane transport protein found in the plasma membrane of diverse cell types and tissues, and in nuclear, mitochondrial, and Golgi membranes. It is the major integral transmembrane protein of the erythrocyte plasma membrane, comprising 25% of the total membrane protein. It exists as a dimer and performs the important function of allowing the efficient transport of bicarbonate across erythrocyte cell membranes in exchange for chloride ion.

Erythrocyte Membrane Aspartic Proteinase
An aspartic endopeptidase of the hydrolase class that is similar to cathepsin D but has a slightly broader specificity. EC 3.4.23.34.

Erythrocyte Membrane Band 3 Protein
A ubiquitous membrane transport protein found in the plasma membrane of diverse cell types and tissues, and in nuclear, mitochondrial, and Golgi membranes. It is the major integral transmembrane protein of the erythrocyte plasma membrane, comprising 25% of the total membrane protein. It exists as a dimer and performs the important function of allowing the efficient transport of bicarbonate across erythrocyte cell membranes in exchange for chloride ion.

Erythrocyte Number
A count of the number of red blood cells per unit volume in a sample of venous blood.

Erythrocyte Numbers
A count of the number of red blood cells per unit volume in a sample of venous blood.

Erythrocyte Sedimentation
Measurement of rate of settling of erythrocytes in anticoagulated blood.

Erythrocyte sedimentation rate
blood test that measures the speed at which red blood cells settle on the bottom of a test tube; high sedimentation rate signals possible inflammatory disease.

Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate
Measurement of rate of settling of erythrocytes in anticoagulated blood.

Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rates
Measurement of rate of settling of erythrocytes in anticoagulated blood.

Erythrocyte Sialoglycoprotein
The major sialoglycoprotein of the human erythrocyte membrane. It consists of at least two sialoglycopeptides and is composed of 60% carbohydrate including sialic acid and 40% protein. It is involved in a number of different biological activities including the binding of MN blood groups, influenza viruses, kidney bean phytohemagglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin.

Erythrocyte Size Determination
Quantification of size and cell hemoglobin content or concentration of the erythrocyte, usually derived from erythrocyte count, blood hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit. Includes the mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Use also for cell diameter and thickness.

Erythrocyte Size Determinations
Quantification of size and cell hemoglobin content or concentration of the erythrocyte, usually derived from erythrocyte count, blood hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit. Includes the mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Use also for cell diameter and thickness.

Erythrocyte Substitutes
Substances that can carry oxygen to and carbon dioxide away from the tissues when introduced into the blood stream. They are used to replace hemoglobin in severe hemorrhage and also to perfuse isolated organs. The best known are perfluorocarbon emulsions and various hemoglobin solutions.

Erythrocyte Survival
Senescence of the red blood cell. Lacking the organelles that make protein synthesis possible, the mature erythrocyte is incapable of self-repair, reproduction, and carrying out certain functions performed by other cells. This limits the average life span of an erythrocyte to 120 days.

Erythrocyte Transfusion
The transfer of erythrocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.

Erythrocyte Transfusions
The transfer of erythrocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.

Erythrocyte Volume
Volume of circulating erythrocytes. It is usually measured by radioisotope dilution technique.

Erythrocyte Volume, Mean Cell
Quantification of size and cell hemoglobin content or concentration of the erythrocyte, usually derived from erythrocyte count, blood hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit. Includes the mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Use also for cell diameter and thickness.

Erythrocyte Volume, Packed
Measurement of the volume of packed red cells in a blood specimen by centrifugation. The procedure is performed using a tube with graduated markings or with automated blood cell counters. It is used as an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, anemia shows a low hematocrit, polycythemia, high values.

Erythrocyte Volumes
Volume of circulating erythrocytes. It is usually measured by radioisotope dilution technique.

Erythrocyte Volumes, Packed
Measurement of the volume of packed red cells in a blood specimen by centrifugation. The procedure is performed using a tube with graduated markings or with automated blood cell counters. It is used as an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, anemia shows a low hematocrit, polycythemia, high values.

Erythrocyte, Nucleated
Immature, nucleated erythrocytes occupying the stage of ERYTHROPOIESIS that follows formation of ERYTHROID PROGENITOR CELLS and precedes formation of RETICULOCYTES. Popularly called normoblasts.

Erythrocyte-Binding Glycoprotein, T11
Glycoprotein members of the immunoglobulin superfamily which participate in T-cell adhesion and activation. They are expressed on most peripheral T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and thymocytes, and function as co-receptors or accessory molecules in the T-cell receptor complex.

Erythrocytes, Artificial
Substances that can carry oxygen to and carbon dioxide away from the tissues when introduced into the blood stream. They are used to replace hemoglobin in severe hemorrhage and also to perfuse isolated organs. The best known are perfluorocarbon emulsions and various hemoglobin solutions.

Erythrocytes, Nucleated
Immature, nucleated erythrocytes occupying the stage of ERYTHROPOIESIS that follows formation of ERYTHROID PROGENITOR CELLS and precedes formation of RETICULOCYTES. Popularly called normoblasts.

Erythrocytoses
An increase in the total red cell mass of the blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Erythrocytosis
An increase in the total red cell mass of the blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Erythroderma
The widespread involvement of the skin by a scaly, erythematous dermatitis occurring either as a secondary or reactive process to an underlying cutaneous disorder (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, etc.), or as a primary or idiopathic disease. It is often associated with the loss of hair and nails, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and pruritus. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Erythroderma Ichthyosiforme, Bullous
A form of congenital ichthyosis inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized by erythroderma and severe hyperkeratosis. It is manifested at birth by blisters followed by the appearance of thickened, horny, verruciform scales over the entire body, but accentuated in flexural areas.

Erythroderma Ichthyosiforme, Nonbullous
A chronic, congenital ichthyosis inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Infants are usually born encased in a collodion membrane which sheds within a few weeks. Scaling is generalized and marked with grayish-brown quadrilateral scales, adherent at their centers and free at the edges. In some cases, scales are so thick that they resemble armored plate.

Erythroderma, Congenital Ichthyosiform
Designation for several severe forms of ichthyosis, present at birth, that are characterized by hyperkeratotic scaling. Infants may be born encased in a collodion membrane which begins shedding within 24 hours. This is followed in about two weeks by persistent generalized scaling. The forms include bullous (HYPERKERATOSIS, EPIDERMOLYTIC), non-bullous (ICHTHYOSIS, LAMELLAR), wet type, and dry type.

Erythroderma, Maculopapular
The term applied to a group of relatively uncommon inflammatory, maculopapular, scaly eruptions of unknown etiology and resistant to conventional treatment. Eruptions are both psoriatic and lichenoid in appearance, but the diseases are distinct from psoriasis, lichen planus, or other recognized dermatoses. Proposed nomenclature divides parapsoriasis into two distinct subgroups, PITYRIASIS LICHENOIDES and parapsoriasis en plaques (small- and large-plaque parapsoriasis).

Erythroderma, Sezary
A form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma manifested by generalized exfoliative erythroderma, intense pruritus, peripheral lymphadenopathy, and abnormal hyperchromatic mononuclear cells in the skin, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood (Sezary cells). (Dorland, 27th ed)

Erythrodermas
The widespread involvement of the skin by a scaly, erythematous dermatitis occurring either as a secondary or reactive process to an underlying cutaneous disorder (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, etc.), or as a primary or idiopathic disease. It is often associated with the loss of hair and nails, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and pruritus. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Erythrodermas, Congenital Ichthyosiform
Designation for several severe forms of ichthyosis, present at birth, that are characterized by hyperkeratotic scaling. Infants may be born encased in a collodion membrane which begins shedding within 24 hours. This is followed in about two weeks by persistent generalized scaling. The forms include bullous (HYPERKERATOSIS, EPIDERMOLYTIC), non-bullous (ICHTHYOSIS, LAMELLAR), wet type, and dry type.

Erythrodermas, Maculopapular
The term applied to a group of relatively uncommon inflammatory, maculopapular, scaly eruptions of unknown etiology and resistant to conventional treatment. Eruptions are both psoriatic and lichenoid in appearance, but the diseases are distinct from psoriasis, lichen planus, or other recognized dermatoses. Proposed nomenclature divides parapsoriasis into two distinct subgroups, PITYRIASIS LICHENOIDES and parapsoriasis en plaques (small- and large-plaque parapsoriasis).

Erythrodermic psoriasis
A particularly inflammatory form of psoriasis that often affects most of the body surface. It is the least common form of psoriasis and most commonly appears on people who have unstable plaque psoriasis, where lesions are not clearly defined. The erythrodermic form of psoriasis is characterized by periodic, widespread, fiery redness of the skin. The erythema (reddening) and exfoliation (shedding) of the skin are often accompanied by severe itching and pain. Swelling may also develop.

Erythrohepatic Porphyria
A form of porphyria characterized by a wide range of photocutaneous changes, liver disease, and an excess of protoporphyrin.

Erythrohepatic Porphyrias
A form of porphyria characterized by a wide range of photocutaneous changes, liver disease, and an excess of protoporphyrin.

Erythroid Burst-Forming Unit
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythroid Burst-Forming Units
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythroid Colony-Forming Unit
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythroid Colony-Forming Units
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythroid Precursor Cell
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythroid Precursor Cells
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythroid Progenitor Cell
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythroid Progenitor Cells
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythroid Stem Cell
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythroid Stem Cells
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythroidine, Dihydro beta
Dihydro analog of beta-erythroidine, which is isolated from the seeds and other plant parts of Erythrina sp. Leguminosae. It is an alkaloid with curarimimetic properties.

Erythroleukemia
A form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) involving the cells that give rise to the erythrocytes (the red blood cells). In this type of leukemia, the body produces large numbers of abnormal, immature red blood cells. Erythroleukemia is classified as acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) of the M6 type.

Erythroleukemias
A myeloproliferative disorder characterized by neoplastic proliferation of erythroblastic and myeloblastic elements with atypical erythroblasts and myeloblasts in the peripheral blood.

Erythromelalgia
Disease marked by paroxysmal, bilateral vasodilatation, particularly of the extremities, with burning pain, and increased skin temperature and redness.

Erythromelalgias
Disease marked by paroxysmal, bilateral vasodilatation, particularly of the extremities, with burning pain, and increased skin temperature and redness.

Erythromycin
An antibiotic derived from the bacterium Streptomyces erythreus which is especially effective against gram positive bacteria. This antibiotic is often used to treat people who are allergic to penicillin, to treat penicillin-resistant infections and acne.

Erythromycin A
A bacteriostatic antibiotic substance produced by Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin A is considered its major active component. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.

Erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide
Erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): benzoyl peroxide; erythromycin.

Erythromycin C
A bacteriostatic antibiotic substance produced by Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin A is considered its major active component. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.

Erythromycin estolate
Erythromycin estolate is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): erythromycin estolate.

Erythromycin Estolate
A macrolide antibiotic, produced by Streptomyces erythreus. It is the lauryl sulfate salt of the propionic ester of erythromycin. This erythromycin salt acts primarily as a bacteriostatic agent. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.

Erythromycin ethylsuccinate
Erythromycin ethylsuccinate is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): erythromycin ethylsuccinate.

Erythromycin Ethylsuccinate
A macrolide antibiotic, produced by Streptomyces erythreus. This compound is an ester of erythromycin base and succinic acid. It acts primarily as a bacteriostatic agent. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.

Erythromycin ethylsuccinate and sulfisoxazole acetyl
Erythromycin ethylsuccinate and sulfisoxazole acetyl is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): erythromycin ethylsuccinate; sulfisoxazole acetyl.

Erythromycin Lactate
A bacteriostatic antibiotic substance produced by Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin A is considered its major active component. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.

Erythromycin lactobionate
Erythromycin lactobionate is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): erythromycin lactobionate.

Erythromycin Phosphate
A bacteriostatic antibiotic substance produced by Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin A is considered its major active component. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.

Erythromycin Propionate Dodecyl Sulfate
A macrolide antibiotic, produced by Streptomyces erythreus. It is the lauryl sulfate salt of the propionic ester of erythromycin. This erythromycin salt acts primarily as a bacteriostatic agent. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.

Erythromycin Propionate Lauryl Sulfate
A macrolide antibiotic, produced by Streptomyces erythreus. It is the lauryl sulfate salt of the propionic ester of erythromycin. This erythromycin salt acts primarily as a bacteriostatic agent. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.

Erythromycin Propionate Monododecyl Sulfate
A macrolide antibiotic, produced by Streptomyces erythreus. It is the lauryl sulfate salt of the propionic ester of erythromycin. This erythromycin salt acts primarily as a bacteriostatic agent. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.

Erythromycin stearate
Erythromycin stearate is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): erythromycin stearate.

Erythroped
A macrolide antibiotic, produced by Streptomyces erythreus. This compound is an ester of erythromycin base and succinic acid. It acts primarily as a bacteriostatic agent. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.

Erythrophobia
An abnormal and persistent fear of blushing. Sufferers of erythrophobia experience undue anxiety even though they realize their fear is irrational. Their anxiety results from worry about being the focus of attention and the subject of embarrassment. Attempts to suppress blushing often have the opposite effect. Sufferers of erythrophobia tend to avoid social gatherings and workplace projects that require them to interact with, or speak before, groups of co-workers.

Erythroplakia
A reddened patch with a velvety surface found in the mouth.

Erythroplasia
A condition of the mucous membrane characterized by erythematous papular lesions. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Erythroplasias
A condition of the mucous membrane characterized by erythematous papular lesions. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Erythropoieses
The production of erythrocytes. In the human, in early embryonic life they are produced in the yolk sac; in the middle trimester, by the liver; in the third trimester and after birth, by the bone marrow exclusively. The maintenance in a normal individual of a remarkably constant erythrocyte count and erythrocyte mass in the peripheral blood implies the existence of an erythropoietic stimulus that under physiological conditions so regulates the rate of production of new erythrocytes as to balance the rate of normal destruction. (Guyton, Textbook of Medical Physiology, 8th ed, p356 & Miale, Laboratory Medicine Hematology, 6th ed, p17)

Erythropoiesis
The formation of red blood cells.

Erythropoietic Porphyria
Autosomal recessive porphyria characterized by splenomegaly, photosensitivity, hemolytic anemia, and the appearance of red urine in early infancy. This condition results from increased synthesis of uroporphyrinogen I relative to uroporphyrinogen III in bone marrow normoblasts.

Erythropoietic Porphyria, Congenital
Autosomal recessive porphyria characterized by splenomegaly, photosensitivity, hemolytic anemia, and the appearance of red urine in early infancy. This condition results from increased synthesis of uroporphyrinogen I relative to uroporphyrinogen III in bone marrow normoblasts.

Erythropoietic Porphyrias
Autosomal recessive porphyria characterized by splenomegaly, photosensitivity, hemolytic anemia, and the appearance of red urine in early infancy. This condition results from increased synthesis of uroporphyrinogen I relative to uroporphyrinogen III in bone marrow normoblasts.

Erythropoietic Porphyrias, Congenital
Autosomal recessive porphyria characterized by splenomegaly, photosensitivity, hemolytic anemia, and the appearance of red urine in early infancy. This condition results from increased synthesis of uroporphyrinogen I relative to uroporphyrinogen III in bone marrow normoblasts.

Erythropoietic Progenitor Cell
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythropoietic Progenitor Cells
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythropoietic Protoporphyria
A form of porphyria characterized by a wide range of photocutaneous changes, liver disease, and an excess of protoporphyrin.

Erythropoietic Protoporphyrias
A form of porphyria characterized by a wide range of photocutaneous changes, liver disease, and an excess of protoporphyrin.

Erythropoietic Stem Cell
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythropoietic Stem Cells
Committed, erythroid stem cells derived from myeloid stem cells. The progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by erythropoietin, and then further differentiate into erythroblasts when stimulated by other factors.

Erythropoietin
Glycoprotein hormone, secreted chiefly by the kidney in the adult and the liver in the fetus, that acts on erythroid stem cells of the bone marrow to stimulate proliferation and differentiation.

Erythropoietin (EPO)
A hormone produced by the kidney that promotes the formation of red blood cells in the bone marrow. EPO is a glycoprotein (a protein with a sugar attached to it). Human EPO has a molecular weight of 34,000.

Erythropoietin Receptor
Cell surface proteins that bind erythropoietin with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells.

Erythropoietin Receptors
Cell surface proteins that bind erythropoietin with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells.

Erythropoietin test
A test of the hormone erythropoietin (EPO) in blood. An abnormal level of EPO may mean bone marrow or kidney disease or EPO abuse.

Erythropoietin, Recombinant
ERYTHROPOIETIN prepared by recombinant DNA technology.

Erythrose Reductase
An enzyme that catalyzes reversibly the oxidation of an aldose to an alditol. It possesses broad specificity for many aldoses. EC 1.1.1.21.

Erythrosin
A vital stain and coloring agent used in dentistry to disclose plaque. It is used as a tissue stain and dye in foods and pharmaceuticals, may inhibit some enzymes, and is preferentially absorbed by certain tumor cells.

Erythrosin B
A vital stain and coloring agent used in dentistry to disclose plaque. It is used as a tissue stain and dye in foods and pharmaceuticals, may inhibit some enzymes, and is preferentially absorbed by certain tumor cells.

Erythrosine
A vital stain and coloring agent used in dentistry to disclose plaque. It is used as a tissue stain and dye in foods and pharmaceuticals, may inhibit some enzymes, and is preferentially absorbed by certain tumor cells.

Erythrosine B
A vital stain and coloring agent used in dentistry to disclose plaque. It is used as a tissue stain and dye in foods and pharmaceuticals, may inhibit some enzymes, and is preferentially absorbed by certain tumor cells.

Erythrovirus
A genus of the family PARVOVIRIDAE, subfamily PARVOVIRINAE, and containing the type species PARVOVIRUS B19, HUMAN.

Erythroviruses
A genus of the family PARVOVIRIDAE, subfamily PARVOVIRINAE, and containing the type species PARVOVIRUS B19, HUMAN.

Erythroxylaceae
A plant family of the order Linales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida best known for the coca plant.

Erythroxylon
Any of several South American shrubs of the Erythroxylon genus (and family) that yield COCAINE; the leaves are chewed with alum for CNS stimulation.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
--------------------------------------

Erythrocyte Indices
Quantification of size and cell hemoglobin content or concentration of the erythrocyte, usually derived from erythrocyte count, blood hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit. Includes the mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Use also for cell diameter and thickness.

Erythrocyte Indexes
Quantification of size and cell hemoglobin content or concentration of the erythrocyte, usually derived from erythrocyte count, blood hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit. Includes the mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Use also for cell diameter and thickness.

Erythrocyte Index
Quantification of size and cell hemoglobin content or concentration of the erythrocyte, usually derived from erythrocyte count, blood hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit. Includes the mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Use also for cell diameter and thickness.

Erythrocyte Inclusions
Pathologic inclusions occurring in erythrocytes.

Erythrocytes, Artificial
Substances that can carry oxygen to and carbon dioxide away from the tissues when introduced into the blood stream. They are used to replace hemoglobin in severe hemorrhage and also to perfuse isolated organs. The best known are perfluorocarbon emulsions and various hemoglobin solutions.

Erythrocytes

Erythrocyte-Binding Glycoprotein, T11
Glycoprotein members of the immunoglobulin superfamily which participate in T-cell adhesion and activation. They are expressed on most peripheral T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and thymocytes, and function as co-receptors or accessory molecules in the T-cell receptor complex.

Erythrocyte, Nucleated
Immature, nucleated erythrocytes occupying the stage of ERYTHROPOIESIS that follows formation of ERYTHROID PROGENITOR CELLS and precedes formation of RETICULOCYTES. Popularly called normoblasts.

Erythrocyte Volumes, Packed
Measurement of the volume of packed red cells in a blood specimen by centrifugation. The procedure is performed using a tube with graduated markings or with automated blood cell counters. It is used as an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, anemia shows a low hematocrit, polycythemia, high values.

Erythrocyte Volume, Mean Cell
Quantification of size and cell hemoglobin content or concentration of the erythrocyte, usually derived from erythrocyte count, blood hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit. Includes the mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Use also for cell diameter and thickness.

Erythrocyte Volumes
Volume of circulating erythrocytes. It is usually measured by radioisotope dilution technique.

   We thank you for using the Health Dictionary to search for Erythrocytes. If you have a better definition for Erythrocytes than the one presented here, please let us know by making use of the suggest a term option. This definition of Erythrocytes may be disputed by other professionals. Our attempt is to provide easy definitions on Erythrocytes and any other medical topic for the public at large.
 
This dictionary contains 59020 terms.      









  
                    © Health Dictionary 2005 - All rights reserved -

   rythrocytes / eythrocytes / erthrocytes / eryhrocytes / erytrocytes / erythocytes / erythrcytes / erythroytes / erythroctes / erythrocyes / erythrocyts / erythrocyte / eerythrocytes / errythrocytes / eryythrocytes / erytthrocytes / erythhrocytes / erythrrocytes / erythroocytes / erythroccytes / erythrocyytes / erythrocyttes / erythrocytees / erythrocytess / 3rythrocytes / 4rythrocytes / rrythrocytes / frythrocytes / drythrocytes / srythrocytes / wrythrocytes / e4ythrocytes / e5ythrocytes / etythrocytes / egythrocytes / efythrocytes / edythrocytes / eeythrocytes / e3ythrocytes / er6throcytes / er7throcytes / eruthrocytes / erjthrocytes / erhthrocytes / ergthrocytes / ertthrocytes / er5throcytes / ery5hrocytes / ery6hrocytes / eryyhrocytes / eryhhrocytes / eryghrocytes / eryfhrocytes / eryrhrocytes / ery4hrocytes / erytyrocytes / eryturocytes / erytjrocytes / erytnrocytes / erytbrocytes / erytgrocytes / eryttrocytes / eryth4ocytes / eryth5ocytes / erythtocytes / erythgocytes / erythfocytes / erythdocytes / erytheocytes / eryth3ocytes / erythr9cytes / erythr0cytes / erythrpcytes / erythrlcytes / erythrkcytes / erythricytes / erythr8cytes / erythroxytes / erythrosytes / erythrodytes / erythrofytes / erythrovytes / erythro ytes / erythroc6tes / erythroc7tes / erythrocutes / erythrocjtes / erythrochtes / erythrocgtes / erythrocttes / erythroc5tes / erythrocy5es / erythrocy6es / erythrocyyes / erythrocyhes / erythrocyges / erythrocyfes / erythrocyres / erythrocy4es / erythrocyt3s / erythrocyt4s / erythrocytrs / erythrocytfs / erythrocytds / erythrocytss / erythrocytws / erythrocytew / erythrocytee / erythrocyted / erythrocytex / erythrocytez / erythrocytea / erythrocyteq /