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  Equipment



Equipment

   Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.

RELATED TERMS
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Equipment
Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.

Diagnostic
Pertaining to a diagnosis; usually refers to a characteristic or criteria which is critical for a specific diagnosis.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Equid herpesvirus 1
A species of VARICELLOVIRUS causing abortion and respiratory disease in horses.

Equid herpesvirus 2
A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting New World primates and other species. HERPESVIRUS 2, SAIMIRIINE is the type species.

Equid herpesvirus 3
A species of VARICELLOVIRUS causing coital exanthema in horses.

Equid herpesvirus 4
A species of VARICELLOVIRUS and the chief cause of rhinopneumonitis in horses.

Equidae
A family of hoofed mammals consisting of HORSES, asses, donkeys, and zebras. Members of this family are strict herbivores and can be classified as either browsers or grazers depending on how they feed.

Equilenin
3-Hydroxyestra-1,3,5(10),6,8-pentaen-17-one. A naturally occurring steroid with estrogenic activity obtained from the urine of pregnant mares.

Equilibrations, Occlusal
Selective grinding of occlusal surfaces of the teeth in an effort to eliminate premature contacts and occlusal interferences; to establish optimal masticatory effectiveness, stable occlusal relationships, direction of main occlusal forces, and efficient multidirectional patterns, to improve functional relations and to induce physiologic stimulation of the masticatory system; to eliminate occlusal trauma; to eliminate abnormal muscle tension; to aid in the stabilization of orthodontic results; to treat peridontal and temporomandibular joint problems; and in restorative procedures. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)

Equilibrium
A state of being evenly balanced or the harmonious performance of function. Its physiological application is in the biomechanical responses of the musculoskeletal system during standing, walking, sitting, and other movements. Stability and equilibrium are related to the mathematics of the center of gravity of the body.

Equilibrium disorders
Balance disorders.

Equilibrium Radionuclide Angiocardiographies
Radionuclide ventriculography where scintigraphic data is acquired during repeated cardiac cycles at specific times in the cycle, using an electrocardiographic synchronizer or gating device. Analysis of right ventricular function is difficult with this technique; that is best evaluated by first-pass ventriculography (VENTRICULOGRAPHY, FIRST-PASS).

Equilibrium Radionuclide Angiocardiography
Radionuclide ventriculography where scintigraphic data is acquired during repeated cardiac cycles at specific times in the cycle, using an electrocardiographic synchronizer or gating device. Analysis of right ventricular function is difficult with this technique; that is best evaluated by first-pass ventriculography (VENTRICULOGRAPHY, FIRST-PASS).

Equilibrium Radionuclide Angiographies
Radionuclide ventriculography where scintigraphic data is acquired during repeated cardiac cycles at specific times in the cycle, using an electrocardiographic synchronizer or gating device. Analysis of right ventricular function is difficult with this technique; that is best evaluated by first-pass ventriculography (VENTRICULOGRAPHY, FIRST-PASS).

Equilibrium Radionuclide Angiography
Radionuclide ventriculography where scintigraphic data is acquired during repeated cardiac cycles at specific times in the cycle, using an electrocardiographic synchronizer or gating device. Analysis of right ventricular function is difficult with this technique; that is best evaluated by first-pass ventriculography (VENTRICULOGRAPHY, FIRST-PASS).

Equilibrium Radionuclide Ventriculographies
Radionuclide ventriculography where scintigraphic data is acquired during repeated cardiac cycles at specific times in the cycle, using an electrocardiographic synchronizer or gating device. Analysis of right ventricular function is difficult with this technique; that is best evaluated by first-pass ventriculography (VENTRICULOGRAPHY, FIRST-PASS).

Equilibrium Radionuclide Ventriculography
Radionuclide ventriculography where scintigraphic data is acquired during repeated cardiac cycles at specific times in the cycle, using an electrocardiographic synchronizer or gating device. Analysis of right ventricular function is difficult with this technique; that is best evaluated by first-pass ventriculography (VENTRICULOGRAPHY, FIRST-PASS).

Equilibrium Scintigraphies
Radionuclide ventriculography where scintigraphic data is acquired during repeated cardiac cycles at specific times in the cycle, using an electrocardiographic synchronizer or gating device. Analysis of right ventricular function is difficult with this technique; that is best evaluated by first-pass ventriculography (VENTRICULOGRAPHY, FIRST-PASS).

Equilibrium Scintigraphy
Radionuclide ventriculography where scintigraphic data is acquired during repeated cardiac cycles at specific times in the cycle, using an electrocardiographic synchronizer or gating device. Analysis of right ventricular function is difficult with this technique; that is best evaluated by first-pass ventriculography (VENTRICULOGRAPHY, FIRST-PASS).

Equilibrium, Acid-Base
The balance between acids and bases in the blood plasma. Normally it results in a slightly alkaline state with an excess of hydroxyl ions in comparison to hydrogen. The balance is achieved by the offset of the ingestion and production of acidic and basic material by the amount of acidic and basic material metabolized and excreted by the body.

Equilibrium, Genetic
The study of the genetic composition of populations and of the effects of factors such as selection, population size, mutation, migration, and genetic drift on the frequencies of various genotypes and phenotypes.

Equilin
3-Hydroxyestra-1,3,5(10)7-tetraen-17-one. A naturally occurring steroid with estrogenic activity obtained from the urine of pregnant mares.

Equiluminant stimuli
Visual stimuli that vary only in color but not in luminance. Stereopsis and motion perception disappear at equiluminance indicating the presence of separate processing channels for color, motion and stereopsis.

Equina, Cauda
The lower part of the SPINAL CORD consisting of the lumbar, sacral, and coccygeal nerve roots.

Equine abortion Virus
A species of VARICELLOVIRUS causing abortion and respiratory disease in horses.

Equine abortion Viruses
A species of VARICELLOVIRUS causing abortion and respiratory disease in horses.

Equine arteritis virus
The type species of the genus ARTERIVIRUS and the etiologic agent of an important equine respiratory disease causing abortion, pneumonia, or other infections.

Equine Arteritis Viruses
The type species of the genus ARTERIVIRUS and the etiologic agent of an important equine respiratory disease causing abortion, pneumonia, or other infections.

Equine coital exanthema virus
A species of VARICELLOVIRUS causing coital exanthema in horses.

Equine Disease
Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.

Equine Diseases
Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.

Equine Encephalitides, Eastern
A form of arboviral encephalitis (primarily affecting equines) endemic to eastern regions of North America. The causative organism (ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS, EASTERN EQUINE) may be transmitted to humans via the bite of AEDES mosquitoes. Clinical manifestations include the acute onset of fever, HEADACHE, altered mentation, and SEIZURES followed by coma. The condition is fatal in up to 50% of cases. Recovery may be marked by residual neurologic deficits and EPILEPSY. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp9-10)

Equine Encephalitis
A group of ALPHAVIRUS INFECTIONS which affect horses and man, transmitted via the bites of mosquitoes. Disorders in this category are endemic to regions of South America and North America. In humans, clinical manifestations vary with the type of infection, and range from a mild influenza-like syndrome to a fulminant encephalitis. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp8-10)

Equine Encephalitis, Eastern
A form of arboviral encephalitis (primarily affecting equines) endemic to eastern regions of North America. The causative organism (ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS, EASTERN EQUINE) may be transmitted to humans via the bite of AEDES mosquitoes. Clinical manifestations include the acute onset of fever, HEADACHE, altered mentation, and SEIZURES followed by coma. The condition is fatal in up to 50% of cases. Recovery may be marked by residual neurologic deficits and EPILEPSY. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp9-10)

Equine Encephalitis, Venezuelan
A form of arboviral encephalitis endemic to Central America and the northern latitudes of South America. The causative organism (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, VENEZUELAN EQUINE) is transmitted to humans and horses via the bite of several mosquito species. Human viral infection may be asymptomatic or remain restricted to a mild influenza-like illness. Encephalitis, usually not severe, occurs in a small percentage of cases and may rarely feature SEIZURES and COMA. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp9-10)

Equine Encephalitis, Western
A form of arboviral encephalitis (which primarily affects horses) endemic to western and central regions of NORTH AMERICA. The causative organism (ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS, WESTERN EQUINE) may be transferred to humans via the bite of mosquitoes (CULEX tarsalis and others). Clinical manifestations include headache and influenza-like symptoms followed by alterations in mentation, SEIZURES, and COMA. DEATH occurs in a minority of cases. Survivors may recover fully or be left with residual neurologic dysfunction, including PARKINSONISM, POSTENCEPHALITIC. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp8-9)

Equine Encephalomyelitides, Eastern
A form of arboviral encephalitis (primarily affecting equines) endemic to eastern regions of North America. The causative organism (ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS, EASTERN EQUINE) may be transmitted to humans via the bite of AEDES mosquitoes. Clinical manifestations include the acute onset of fever, HEADACHE, altered mentation, and SEIZURES followed by coma. The condition is fatal in up to 50% of cases. Recovery may be marked by residual neurologic deficits and EPILEPSY. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp9-10)

Equine Encephalomyelitides, Venezuelan
A form of arboviral encephalitis endemic to Central America and the northern latitudes of South America. The causative organism (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, VENEZUELAN EQUINE) is transmitted to humans and horses via the bite of several mosquito species. Human viral infection may be asymptomatic or remain restricted to a mild influenza-like illness. Encephalitis, usually not severe, occurs in a small percentage of cases and may rarely feature SEIZURES and COMA. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp9-10)

Equine Encephalomyelitis
A group of ALPHAVIRUS INFECTIONS which affect horses and man, transmitted via the bites of mosquitoes. Disorders in this category are endemic to regions of South America and North America. In humans, clinical manifestations vary with the type of infection, and range from a mild influenza-like syndrome to a fulminant encephalitis. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp8-10)

Equine Encephalomyelitis Viral Infections
A group of ALPHAVIRUS INFECTIONS which affect horses and man, transmitted via the bites of mosquitoes. Disorders in this category are endemic to regions of South America and North America. In humans, clinical manifestations vary with the type of infection, and range from a mild influenza-like syndrome to a fulminant encephalitis. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp8-10)

Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus Infections
A group of ALPHAVIRUS INFECTIONS which affect horses and man, transmitted via the bites of mosquitoes. Disorders in this category are endemic to regions of South America and North America. In humans, clinical manifestations vary with the type of infection, and range from a mild influenza-like syndrome to a fulminant encephalitis. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp8-10)

Equine Encephalomyelitis, Eastern
A form of arboviral encephalitis (primarily affecting equines) endemic to eastern regions of North America. The causative organism (ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS, EASTERN EQUINE) may be transmitted to humans via the bite of AEDES mosquitoes. Clinical manifestations include the acute onset of fever, HEADACHE, altered mentation, and SEIZURES followed by coma. The condition is fatal in up to 50% of cases. Recovery may be marked by residual neurologic deficits and EPILEPSY. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp9-10)

Equine Encephalomyelitis, Venezuelan
A form of arboviral encephalitis endemic to Central America and the northern latitudes of South America. The causative organism (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, VENEZUELAN EQUINE) is transmitted to humans and horses via the bite of several mosquito species. Human viral infection may be asymptomatic or remain restricted to a mild influenza-like illness. Encephalitis, usually not severe, occurs in a small percentage of cases and may rarely feature SEIZURES and COMA. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp9-10)

Equine Gonadotropins
Polypeptide hormones secreted in pregnant mares at the junction of the placenta and endometrial cups. Preparations of this taken from the blood serum of pregnant mares have been used in the treatment of infertility, pituitary dwarfism, cryptorchidism, and other conditions in both human males and females.

Equine Herpesvirus 1
A species of VARICELLOVIRUS causing abortion and respiratory disease in horses.

Equine Herpesvirus 2
A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting New World primates and other species. HERPESVIRUS 2, SAIMIRIINE is the type species.

Equine Herpesvirus 3
A species of VARICELLOVIRUS causing coital exanthema in horses.

Equine Herpesvirus 4
A species of VARICELLOVIRUS and the chief cause of rhinopneumonitis in horses.

Equine Infectious Anemia
Viral disease of horses caused by the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV; INFECTIOUS ANEMIA VIRUS, EQUINE). It is characterized by intermittent fever, weakness, and anemia. Chronic infection consists of acute episodes with remissions.

Equine infectious anemia virus
A species of LENTIVIRUS, subgenus equine lentiviruses (LENTIVIRUSES, EQUINE), causing acute and chronic infection in horses. It is transmitted mechanically by biting flies, mosquitoes, and midges, and iatrogenically through unsterilized equipment. Chronic infection often consists of acute episodes with remissions.

Equine Infectious Anemias
Viral disease of horses caused by the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV; INFECTIOUS ANEMIA VIRUS, EQUINE). It is characterized by intermittent fever, weakness, and anemia. Chronic infection consists of acute episodes with remissions.

Equine Infectious Arteritis Virus
The type species of the genus ARTERIVIRUS and the etiologic agent of an important equine respiratory disease causing abortion, pneumonia, or other infections.

Equine Influenza Virus
The type species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS A that causes INFLUENZA and other diseases in humans and animals. Antigenic variation occurs frequently between strains, allowing classification into subtypes and variants. Transmission is by aerosol (human and most non-aquatic hosts) or waterborne (ducks).

Equine Influenza Viruses
The type species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS A that causes INFLUENZA and other diseases in humans and animals. Antigenic variation occurs frequently between strains, allowing classification into subtypes and variants. Transmission is by aerosol (human and most non-aquatic hosts) or waterborne (ducks).

Equine Lentivirus
A subgenus of LENTIVIRUS comprising viruses that produce multi-organ disease with long incubation periods in horses.

Equine Lentiviruses
A subgenus of LENTIVIRUS comprising viruses that produce multi-organ disease with long incubation periods in horses.

Equine Morbillivirus
A subfamily of PARAMYXOVIRIDAE. Genera include RUBULAVIRUS, RESPIROVIRUS, and MORBILLIVIRUS.

Equine Morbilliviruses
A subfamily of PARAMYXOVIRIDAE. Genera include RUBULAVIRUS, RESPIROVIRUS, and MORBILLIVIRUS.

Equine Plague
An insect-borne reovirus infection of horses, mules and donkeys in Africa and the Middle East; characterized by pulmonary edema, cardiac involvement, and edema of the head and neck.

Equine Plagues
An insect-borne reovirus infection of horses, mules and donkeys in Africa and the Middle East; characterized by pulmonary edema, cardiac involvement, and edema of the head and neck.

Equine rhinitis A virus
A genus of the family PICORNAVIRIDAE infecting mainly cloven-hoofed animals. They cause vesicular lesions and upper respiratory tract infections. FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE VIRUS is the type species.

Equine Rhinopneumonitis Virus
A species of VARICELLOVIRUS and the chief cause of rhinopneumonitis in horses.

Equine Rhinopneumonitis Viruses
A species of VARICELLOVIRUS and the chief cause of rhinopneumonitis in horses.

Equine rhinovirus 1
A genus of the family PICORNAVIRIDAE infecting mainly cloven-hoofed animals. They cause vesicular lesions and upper respiratory tract infections. FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE VIRUS is the type species.

Equine Strongyle Infection
Infection of horses with parasitic nematodes of the superfamily STRONGYLOIDEA. Characteristics include the development of hemorrhagic nodules on the abdominal peritoneum.

Equine Strongyle Infections
Infection of horses with parasitic nematodes of the superfamily STRONGYLOIDEA. Characteristics include the development of hemorrhagic nodules on the abdominal peritoneum.

Equine Strongyloses
Infection of horses with parasitic nematodes of the superfamily STRONGYLOIDEA. Characteristics include the development of hemorrhagic nodules on the abdominal peritoneum.

Equine Strongylosis
Infection of horses with parasitic nematodes of the superfamily STRONGYLOIDEA. Characteristics include the development of hemorrhagic nodules on the abdominal peritoneum.

Equine torovirus
A genus of the family CORONAVIRIDAE characterized by enveloped, peplomer-bearing particles containing an elongated tubular nucleocapsid with helical symmetry. Toroviruses have been found in association with enteric infections in horses (Berne virus), cattle (Breda virus), swine, and humans. Transmission probably takes place via the fecal-oral route.

Equine toroviruses
A genus of the family CORONAVIRIDAE characterized by enveloped, peplomer-bearing particles containing an elongated tubular nucleocapsid with helical symmetry. Toroviruses have been found in association with enteric infections in horses (Berne virus), cattle (Breda virus), swine, and humans. Transmission probably takes place via the fecal-oral route.

Equinophobia
An abnormal and persistent fear of horses. Sufferers of equinophobia experience undue anxiety even when a horse is known to be gentle and well trained. They usually avoid horses entirely rather than risk being kicked, bitten or thrown. They may also fear other hoofed animals such as ponies, donkeys and mules.

Equinovarus
A deformed foot in which the foot is plantarflexed, inverted and adducted.

Equinus Contracture
Plantar declination of the foot.

Equinus Contractures
Plantar declination of the foot.

Equinus Deformities
Plantar declination of the foot.

Equinus Deformity
Plantar declination of the foot.

Equipin
Equipin is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): homatropine methylbromide.

Equipment Alarm System
Failure of equipment to perform up to standards. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.

Equipment Alarm Systems
Failure of equipment to perform up to standards. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.

Equipment and Supplies
Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.

Equipment and Supplies, Hospital
Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.

Equipment Contamination
The presence of an infectious agent on instruments, prostheses, or other inanimate articles.

Equipment Contaminations
The presence of an infectious agent on instruments, prostheses, or other inanimate articles.

Equipment Defect
Failure of equipment to perform up to standards. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.

Equipment Defects
Failure of equipment to perform up to standards. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.

Equipment Failure
Failure of equipment to perform up to standards. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.

Equipment Failure Analyses
Determination of reliability and maintainability of equipment.

Equipment Failure Analysis
Determination of reliability and maintainability of equipment.

Equipment Failures
Failure of equipment to perform up to standards. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.

Equipment Hazard
Freedom of equipment from actual or potential hazards.

Equipment Hazards
Freedom of equipment from actual or potential hazards.

Equipment Malfunction
Failure of equipment to perform up to standards. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.

Equipment Malfunctions
Failure of equipment to perform up to standards. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.

Equipment Misuse
Failure of equipment to perform up to standards. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.

Equipment Misuses
Failure of equipment to perform up to standards. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.

Equipment Recycling
Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.

Equipment Reusability
Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.

Equipment Reuse
Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.

Equipment Safety
Freedom of equipment from actual or potential hazards.

Equipment, Athletic
Equipment required for engaging in a sport (such as balls, bats, rackets, skis, skates, ropes, weights) and devices for the protection of athletes during their performance (such as masks, gloves, mouth pieces).

Equipment, Baby
Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.

Equipment, Computer Peripheral
Various units or machines that operate in combination or in conjunction with a computer but are not physically part of it. Peripheral devices typically display computer data, store data from the computer and return the data to the computer on demand, prepare data for human use, or acquire data from a source and convert it to a form usable by a computer. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)

Equipment, Diagnostic
Nonexpendable items used in examinination.

Equipment, Disposable
Apparatus, devices, or supplies intended for one-time or temporary use.

Equipment, Durable Medical
Devices which are very resistant to wear and may be used over a long period of time. They include items such as wheelchairs, hospital beds, artificial limbs, etc.

Equipment, Hospital
Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.

Equipment, Household
Various material objects and items in the home. It includes temporary or permanent machinery and appliances. It does not include furniture or interior furnishings (FURNITURE see INTERIOR DESIGN AND FURNISHINGS; INTERIOR FURNISHINGS see INTERIOR DESIGN AND FURNISHINGS).

Equipment, Infant
Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.

Equipment, Medical, Durable
Devices which are very resistant to wear and may be used over a long period of time. They include items such as wheelchairs, hospital beds, artificial limbs, etc.

Equipment, Orthopedic
Nonexpendable items used in the performance of orthopedic surgery and related therapy. They are differentiated from ORTHOTIC DEVICES, apparatus used to prevent or correct deformities in patients.

Equipment, Sports
Equipment required for engaging in a sport (such as balls, bats, rackets, skis, skates, ropes, weights) and devices for the protection of athletes during their performance (such as masks, gloves, mouth pieces).

Equipment, Surgical
Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.

Equipments, Computer Peripheral
Various units or machines that operate in combination or in conjunction with a computer but are not physically part of it. Peripheral devices typically display computer data, store data from the computer and return the data to the computer on demand, prepare data for human use, or acquire data from a source and convert it to a form usable by a computer. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)

Equipments, Diagnostic
Nonexpendable items used in examinination.

Equipments, Orthopedic
Nonexpendable items used in the performance of orthopedic surgery and related therapy. They are differentiated from ORTHOTIC DEVICES, apparatus used to prevent or correct deformities in patients.

Equipments, Surgical
Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.

Equipoise
A state in which an investigator is uncertain about which arm of a clinical trial would be therapeutically superior for a patient. An investigator who has a treatment preference or finds out that one arm of a comparative trial offers a clinically therapeutic advantage should disclose this information to subjects participating in the trial. Ethically, subjects should only be entered or continue in a trial where equipoise exists for that subject.

Equisetaceae
The only living genus of the order Equisetales, class Equisetopsida (Sphenopsida), division Equisetophyta (Sphenophyta); distantly related to ferns. It grows in moist places. The hollow, jointed, ridged stems contain SILICATES.

Equisetum
The only living genus of the order Equisetales, class Equisetopsida (Sphenopsida), division Equisetophyta (Sphenophyta); distantly related to ferns. It grows in moist places. The hollow, jointed, ridged stems contain SILICATES.

Equities, Pay
The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.

Equity, Pay
The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.

Equivalence trial
A trial with the primary objective of showing that the response to two or more treatments differs by an amount which is clinically unimportant. This is usually demonstrated by showing that the true treatment difference is likely to lie between a lower and an upper equivalence level of clinically acceptable differences.

Equivalence zone
In a precipitin reaction, the region in which the concentration of antigen and antibody leads to maximal precipitation.

Equivalencies, Availability
The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.

Equivalencies, Clinical
The relative equivalency in the efficacy of different modes of treatment of a disease, most often used to compare the efficacy of different pharmaceuticals to treat a given disease.

Equivalencies, Generic
The relative equivalency in the efficacy of different modes of treatment of a disease, most often used to compare the efficacy of different pharmaceuticals to treat a given disease.

Equivalencies, Therapeutic
The relative equivalency in the efficacy of different modes of treatment of a disease, most often used to compare the efficacy of different pharmaceuticals to treat a given disease.

Equivalency, Availability
The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.

Equivalency, Clinical
The relative equivalency in the efficacy of different modes of treatment of a disease, most often used to compare the efficacy of different pharmaceuticals to treat a given disease.

Equivalency, Generic
The relative equivalency in the efficacy of different modes of treatment of a disease, most often used to compare the efficacy of different pharmaceuticals to treat a given disease.

Equivalency, Therapeutic
The relative equivalency in the efficacy of different modes of treatment of a disease, most often used to compare the efficacy of different pharmaceuticals to treat a given disease.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Equipment Contamination
The presence of an infectious agent on instruments, prostheses, or other inanimate articles.

Equipment and Supplies, Hospital
Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.

Equipment Alarm Systems
Failure of equipment to perform up to standards. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.

Equipment and Supplies
Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.

Equipment Alarm System
Failure of equipment to perform up to standards. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.

Equipment

Equinus Deformity
Plantar declination of the foot.

Equinus Deformities
Plantar declination of the foot.

Equinus Contractures
Plantar declination of the foot.

Equipment Reusability
Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.

Equipment Recycling
Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.

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