Ephelides
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  Ephelides



Ephelides

   The plural of ephelis, a type of freckle. Ephelis and ephelides are among the many medical terms that are rarely, if ever, encountered outside of medicine.

RELATED TERMS
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Ephelis
A form of freckle. A flat red or light-brown spot on the skin that typically appears during the sunny months and fades in the winter. They are most often found in people with light complexions and in some families, they are an hereditary (genetic) trait. The regular use of sunscreen during times of sun exposure helps to suppress the appearance of the ephelis-type freckle.

Freckle
A flat circular spot on the skin about the size of the head of a nail that develops after repeated exposure to sunlight, particularly in someone of fair complexion. Freckles may be red, yellow, tan, light-brown, brown, or black. They are always darker than the skin around them since they are due to deposits of the dark melanin, a dark pigment.

Ephelides
The plural of ephelis, a type of freckle. Ephelis and ephelides are among the many medical terms that are rarely, if ever, encountered outside of medicine.

Medical
Pertaining to Medicine.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Ephebiatrics
That branch of health care that succeeds pediatrics and serves that age of adolescence and youth, prior to adulthood.

Ephebophilia
A paraphilia of the eligibilic/stigmatic type distinct from nepiophilia and pedophilia in that the age of the partner is postpubertal and adolescent. The technical term for the reciprocal paraphilic condition in which an older person impersonates an adolescent is paraphilic adolescentilism. Synonym, hebephilia, the condtition in which an adult is responsive to and dependent on the actuality or imagery of erotic/sexual activity with an adolescent boy or girl in order to obtain erotic arousal and facilitate or achieve orgasm. An ephebophiliac may be of either sex. Ephebophilic activity may be replayed in fantasy during masturbation or copulation with an older partner.

Ephedra
Ephedra is a genus of gymnosperm shrubs, the only genus in the family Ephedraceae and order Ephedrales. These plants occur in dry climates over a wide area mainly in the Northern Hemisphere, across southern Europe, north Africa, southwest and central Asia, southwestern North America, and, in the Southern Hemisphere, in South America south to Patagonia. They are also called Joint-pine, Jointfir, yellow horse, country mallow, squaw tea or Mormon Tea. The Chinese species are known as Ma huang.

Ephedra sinica
A plant species of the family Ephedraceae, order Ephedrales, class Gnetopsida, division Gnetophyta. It is a source of EPHEDRINE and other alkaloids.

Ephedrine
An alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonist that may also enhance release of norepinephrine. It has been used in the treatment of several disorders including asthma, heart failure, rhinitis, and urinary incontinence, and for its central nervous system stimulatory effects in the treatment of narcolepsy and depression. It has become less extensively used with the advent of more selective agonists.

Ephelis
A form of freckle. A flat red or light-brown spot on the skin that typically appears during the sunny months and fades in the winter. They are most often found in people with light complexions and in some families, they are an hereditary (genetic) trait. The regular use of sunscreen during times of sun exposure helps to suppress the appearance of the ephelis-type freckle.

Ephemera
Transient everyday items, usually printed on paper, that are produced for a specific limited use and then often thrown away. Similar material of the past has acquired literary or historical significance. The word comes from the Greek ephemeros, lasting only a day. (From Genre Terms: A Thesaurus for Use in Rare Book and Special Collections Cataloguing, 2d ed & The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)

Ephemera (PT)
Transient everyday items, usually printed on paper, that are produced for a specific limited use and then often thrown away. Similar material of the past has acquired literary or historical significance. The word comes from the Greek ephemeros, lasting only a day. (From Genre Terms: A Thesaurus for Use in Rare Book and Special Collections Cataloguing, 2d ed & The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)

Ephemera [Publication Type]
Transient everyday items, usually printed on paper, that are produced for a specific limited use and then often thrown away. Similar material of the past has acquired literary or historical significance. The word comes from the Greek ephemeros, lasting only a day. (From Genre Terms: A Thesaurus for Use in Rare Book and Special Collections Cataloguing, 2d ed & The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)

Ephemeral Fever
An Ephemerovirus infection of cattle caused by bovine ephemeral fever virus (EPHEMERAL FEVER VIRUS, BOVINE). It is characterized by respiratory symptoms, increased oropharyngeal secretions and lacrimation, joint pains, tremor, and stiffness.

Ephemeral Fever Virus, Bovine
The type species of EPHEMEROVIRUS causing disease in cattle. Transmission is by hematophagous arthropods and the virus has been isolated from both culicoides and mosquitoes.

Ephemerovirus
A genus of the family RHABDOVIRIDAE which primarily infect cattle. EPHEMERAL FEVER VIRUS, BOVINE is the type species.

Ephemeroviruses
A genus of the family RHABDOVIRIDAE which primarily infect cattle. EPHEMERAL FEVER VIRUS, BOVINE is the type species.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Enzymes, yellow
A group of respiratory enzymes that catalyze reactions in the body permitting cells to respire or breathe. These biochemical reactions are termed oxidation-reduction reactions.

EOG
Electro-oculography. A type of electrophysiologic retinal testing.

EOS
The gene for familial eosinophilia. EOS has been mapped to chromosome region 5q31-33 containing the cytokine gene cluster which includes the genes for interleukin-3 (IL-3), interleukin-5 (IL-5), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and all of which are thought play roles in the development, proliferation, and activation of eosinophils.

Eosinophilia
An abnormally high number of eosinophils in the blood. Normally, eosinophils constitute 1 to 3% of the peripheral blood leukocytes, at a count of 350 to 650 per cubic millimeter. Eosinophilia can be categorized as mild (less than 1500 eosinophils per cubic millimeter), moderate (1500 to 5000 per cubic millimeter), or severe (more than 5000 per cubic millimeter).

Eosinophilic meningitis
Meningitis with a high percentage of eosinophils (a type of white blood cell) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The usual cause is the parasite Angiostrongylus cantonensis, also known as the rat lungworm. People become infected with this parasite by ingesting its larvae in raw or insufficiently cooked snails, slugs, freshwater prawns, frogs, or fish. Infection may also occur by consumption of fresh produce such as contaminated lettuce. When the larvae are ingested, they penetrate the intestinal tract, go into blood vessels, and eventually reach the meninges (the covering of the brain and spinal cord). The larvae usually die there shortly thereafter. An eosinophilic reaction develops in response to the dying larvae. It is manifested by an outpouring of eosinophils in the CSF.

Ephelides

Ephelis
A form of freckle. A flat red or light-brown spot on the skin that typically appears during the sunny months and fades in the winter. They are most often found in people with light complexions and in some families, they are an hereditary (genetic) trait. The regular use of sunscreen during times of sun exposure helps to suppress the appearance of the ephelis-type freckle.

Epicanthal fold
A fold of skin that comes down across the inner angle (canthus) of the eye. The epicanthal fold is more common in children with Down syndrome and other birth defects than normal children and so is of value in diagnosis. Although some dictionaries state that this eye fold is found in peoples of Asian origin, this is not true. The normal Asian eyefold is continuous with the lower edge of the upper eyelid and actually appears distinctly different than a true epicanthal fold.

Epidemic
The occurrence of more cases of a disease than would be expected in a community or region during a given time period. A sudden severe outbreak of a disease such as SARS.

Epidemic hemorrhagic fever
A number of diseases characterized by an abrupt onset of high fever and chills, headache, cold and cough, and pain in the muscles, joints and abdomen with nausea and vomiting followed by bleeding into the kidney and elsewhere. Known also as hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Many arboviruses (including those in the families Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Filoviridae, and Bunyaviridae) and the Hantaviruses, spread by rodents or biting insects, can cause epidemic hemorrhagic fever. The Ebola virus is a notorious cause of epidemic hemorrhagic fever.

Epidemic myalgia
Also known as Bornholm disease, this is a temporary illness that is a result of virus infection. The disease features fever and intense abdominal and chest pains with headache. The chest pain is typically worsened by breathing or coughing. The illness usually lasts from 3 to 14 days. The most common virus causing Bornholm disease is an enterovirus called Coxsackie B. Bornholm disease is also called pleurodynia (because of inflammation of the lining tissue of the lungs).

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