Enervate
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  Enervate



Enervate

   1. To remove part or all of a nerve, a procedure also called a neurectomy. 2. To lose nervous energy and feel sapped of energy.

RELATED TERMS
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Nerve
Tissue that conveys sensation, temperature, position information to the brain.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Enerbol
A neurotropic agent which reduces permeability of blood-brain barrier to phosphate. It has no vitamin B6 activity.

Energies, Solar
Energy transmitted from the sun in the form of electromagnetic radiation.

Energies, Vital (Philosophy)
The vital life force in the body, supposedly able to be regulated by acupuncture. It corresponds roughly to the Greek pneuma, the Latin spiritus, and the ancient Indian prana. The concept of life-breath or vital energy was formulated as an indication of the awareness of man, originally directed externally toward nature or society but later turned inward to the self or life within. (From Comparison between Concepts of Life-Breath in East and West, 15th International Symposium on the Comparative History of Medicine - East and West, August 26-September 3, 1990, Shizuoka, Japan, pp. ix-x)

Energy Generating Resources
Natural energy sources of power supply.

Energy Intake
Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.

Energy Linked Transhydrogenase
An enzyme present in the mitochondrial membrane of animals and in microorganisms. In the presence of energy (ATP) it catalyzes reversibly the reduction of NAD by NADPH to yield NADP and NADH. This reaction permits the utilization of the reducing properties of NADPH by the respiratory chain and in the reverse direction it allows the reduction of NADP for biosynthetic purposes. EC 1.6.1.1.

Energy Resources Conservation
Planned management, use, and preservation of energy resources.

Energy Resources Conservations
Planned management, use, and preservation of energy resources.

Energy Source, Biologic
Implantable devices which convert biological energy (chemical energy of the metabolism of continuously regenerating body fluids or mechanical energy of periodic movements) to electrical energy. The sources include biogalvanic cells, biofuel cells, and ionic concentration cells.

Energy Source, Biological
Implantable devices which convert biological energy (chemical energy of the metabolism of continuously regenerating body fluids or mechanical energy of periodic movements) to electrical energy. The sources include biogalvanic cells, biofuel cells, and ionic concentration cells.

Energy Sources, Bioelectric
Implantable devices which convert biological energy (chemical energy of the metabolism of continuously regenerating body fluids or mechanical energy of periodic movements) to electrical energy. The sources include biogalvanic cells, biofuel cells, and ionic concentration cells.

Energy Sources, Biologic
Implantable devices which convert biological energy (chemical energy of the metabolism of continuously regenerating body fluids or mechanical energy of periodic movements) to electrical energy. The sources include biogalvanic cells, biofuel cells, and ionic concentration cells.

Energy Sources, Biological
Implantable devices which convert biological energy (chemical energy of the metabolism of continuously regenerating body fluids or mechanical energy of periodic movements) to electrical energy. The sources include biogalvanic cells, biofuel cells, and ionic concentration cells.

Energy Supplies
Natural energy sources of power supply.

Energy Supply
Natural energy sources of power supply.

Energy Transfer
The transfer of energy of a given form among different scales of motion. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed). In biochemistry, this concept generally refers to the transfer of groups from compounds that contain energy-rich bonding arrangements to compounds that have relatively energy-poor bonding characteristics via thermodynamically permissible enzymatic reactions. This principle is a major premise of the interaction between energy-producing and energy-utilizing metabolic pathways in living cells. (From Devlin, Textbook of biochemistry with clinical correlations, 3d ed, p246)

Energy Transfer, Linear
Rate of energy dissipation along the path of charged particles. In radiobiology and health physics, exposure is measured in kiloelectron volts per micrometer of tissue (keV/micrometer T).

Energy, Atomic
Energy released by nuclear fission or nuclear fusion.

Energy, Nuclear
Energy released by nuclear fission or nuclear fusion.

Energy, Solar
Energy transmitted from the sun in the form of electromagnetic radiation.

Energy, Vital (Philosophy)
The vital life force in the body, supposedly able to be regulated by acupuncture. It corresponds roughly to the Greek pneuma, the Latin spiritus, and the ancient Indian prana. The concept of life-breath or vital energy was formulated as an indication of the awareness of man, originally directed externally toward nature or society but later turned inward to the self or life within. (From Comparison between Concepts of Life-Breath in East and West, 15th International Symposium on the Comparative History of Medicine - East and West, August 26-September 3, 1990, Shizuoka, Japan, pp. ix-x)

Energy-Generating Resource
Natural energy sources of power supply.

Energy-Generating Resources
Natural energy sources of power supply.

Energy-Linked Transhydrogenase
An enzyme present in the mitochondrial membrane of animals and in microorganisms. In the presence of energy (ATP) it catalyzes reversibly the reduction of NAD by NADPH to yield NADP and NADH. This reaction permits the utilization of the reducing properties of NADPH by the respiratory chain and in the reverse direction it allows the reduction of NADP for biosynthetic purposes. EC 1.6.1.1.

Enervation
The act of enervating or the state of being enervated.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Endothelial
Relating to the endothelium, the layer of flat cells lining the closed spaces of the body such as the inside of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, the heart, and body cavities. By contrast, the outside layer of cells that covers all the free, open surfaces of the body including the skin and mucous membranes that communicate with the outside of the body is called the epithelium.

Endothelial progenitor cell
A primitive cell made in the bone marrow that can enter the bloodstream and go to areas of blood vessel injury to help repair the damage. The number of endothelial progenitor cells in the blood is a risk factor for vascular disease. Depletion or senescence of endothelial progenitor cells may contribute to blood vessel disease.

Endotherm
An endotherm is a warm-blooded animal (such as homo sapiens). Another term for us warm-blooded creatures is homeotherm. An endotherm or homeotherm is as opposed to a poikilotherm (an organism such as a frog that is cold-blooded) and a stenotherm (a creature that can only survive only within a very narrow temperature range).

Endourologist
An endourologist is a urologist with special expertise in navigating, using endoscopic optical instruments and other tools, inside the kidney, ureter and bladder. Endourologists are specialists in treating diseases of these organs.

Enediyne
A very potent and naturally occurring antibiotic that acts by cleaving DNA. The adverse effects of enediynes on cells include mutagenicity (increase mutation), halting mitois (cell division) by arresting the cell cycle, and inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Enervate

Enervation
The act of enervating or the state of being enervated.

Enfeeble
To make feeble or weaken. Years of chronic illness may leave someone enfeebled. The word enfeeble is not often used in medicine, perhaps because of a negative connotation of the word.

Enhanced external counterpulsation
A non-invasive out-patient treatment for heart disease and, in particular, for angina (chest pain due to an inadequate supply of oxygen to the heart muscle). EECP is designed to relieve angina by improving perfusion in areas of the heart deprived of an adequate blood supply. EECP uses a device to inflate and deflate a series of compressive cuffs that are wrapped around the calves and lower and upper thighs. The basic principle involved is that of counterpulsation. The cuffs inflate during diastole, the period when the heart muscle relaxes and the chambers fill with blood. The cuffs inflate sequentially from the calves upwards, resulting in increased pressure in the aorta and coronary arteries. Compression of the vascular bed in the legs also increases the return of venous blood to the heart and increases cardiac output. Patients are customarily treated with EECP for an hour a day for a total of 35 hours.

Enophthalmos
Sunken eyeball.

Enoxaparin
A low-molecular-weight version of heparin which acts like heparin as an anticoagulant (anti-clotting) medication. Enoxaparin is used to prevent thromboembolic complications (clots that travel from their site of origin through the blood stream to clog up another vessel). Enoxaparin is also used in the early treatment of blood clots in the lungs (pulmonary embolisms).

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