Edema
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  Edema



Edema

    Accumulation of abnormal quantities of fluid in spaces between the cells of the body. Edema can accumulate in almost any location in the body. Most common sites include the feet and ankles.

RELATED TERMS
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Abnormal
Not normal. Deviating from the usual structure, position, condition, or behavior. In referring to a growth, abnormal may mean that it is cancerous or premalignant (likely to become cancer).

Edema
Accumulation of abnormal quantities of fluid in spaces between the cells of the body. Edema can accumulate in almost any location in the body. Most common sites include the feet and ankles.

Feet
The plural of foot, both an anatomic structure and a unit of measure. As an anatomic structure, the foot is the end of the leg on which a person normally stands and walks. The foot is a particularly complex structure made up of dozens of bones that work together with muscles and tendons to execute precise movements. The bones of the foot include the 10 metatarsal bones and the 28 phalanges (toe bones).



SIMILAR TERMS
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Edema (dropsy)
The presence of excessive watery fluid in intercellular (especially subcutaneous) spaces or in a bodily cavity; the condition characterized by such presence; and/or the swelling that the presence of excessive fluid causes.

Edema Disease of Swine
An acute disease of young pigs that is usually associated with weaning. It is characterized clinically by paresis and subcutaneous edema.

Edema Proteinuria Hypertension Gestosis
Hypertensive state associated with edema and proteinuria which develops during pregnancy up to the 20th week of gestation, after which it is classified as pre-eclampsia.

Edema, Angioneurotic
Recurring attacks of transient edema suddenly appearing in areas of the skin or mucous membranes and occasionally of the viscera, often associated with dermatographism, urticaria, erythema, and purpura.

Edema, Brain
Increased intracellular or extracellular fluid in brain tissue. Cytotoxic brain edema (swelling due to increased intracellular fluid) is indicative of a disturbance in cell metabolism, and is commonly associated with hypoxic or ischemic injuries (see HYPOXIA, BRAIN). An increase in extracellular fluid may be caused by increased brain capillary permeability (vasogenic edema), an osmotic gradient, local blockages in interstitial fluid pathways, or by obstruction of CSF flow (e.g., obstructive HYDROCEPHALUS). (From Childs Nerv Syst 1992 Sep; 8(6):301-6)

Edema, Cardiac
A manifestation of congestive heart failure caused by increased venous and capillary pressures and often associated with the retention of sodium by the kidneys. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Edema, Cerebral
Increased intracellular or extracellular fluid in brain tissue. Cytotoxic brain edema (swelling due to increased intracellular fluid) is indicative of a disturbance in cell metabolism, and is commonly associated with hypoxic or ischemic injuries (see HYPOXIA, BRAIN). An increase in extracellular fluid may be caused by increased brain capillary permeability (vasogenic edema), an osmotic gradient, local blockages in interstitial fluid pathways, or by obstruction of CSF flow (e.g., obstructive HYDROCEPHALUS). (From Childs Nerv Syst 1992 Sep; 8(6):301-6)

Edema, Corneal
An excessive amount of fluid in the cornea due to damage of the epithelium or endothelium causing decreased visual acuity.

Edema, Cystoid Macular
Macular degeneration characterized by edema and cystic spaces which may lead to a macular depression or hole.

Edema, Cytotoxic Brain
Increased intracellular or extracellular fluid in brain tissue. Cytotoxic brain edema (swelling due to increased intracellular fluid) is indicative of a disturbance in cell metabolism, and is commonly associated with hypoxic or ischemic injuries (see HYPOXIA, BRAIN). An increase in extracellular fluid may be caused by increased brain capillary permeability (vasogenic edema), an osmotic gradient, local blockages in interstitial fluid pathways, or by obstruction of CSF flow (e.g., obstructive HYDROCEPHALUS). (From Childs Nerv Syst 1992 Sep; 8(6):301-6)

Edema, Cytotoxic Cerebral
Increased intracellular or extracellular fluid in brain tissue. Cytotoxic brain edema (swelling due to increased intracellular fluid) is indicative of a disturbance in cell metabolism, and is commonly associated with hypoxic or ischemic injuries (see HYPOXIA, BRAIN). An increase in extracellular fluid may be caused by increased brain capillary permeability (vasogenic edema), an osmotic gradient, local blockages in interstitial fluid pathways, or by obstruction of CSF flow (e.g., obstructive HYDROCEPHALUS). (From Childs Nerv Syst 1992 Sep; 8(6):301-6)

Edema, Fetal
Edema of the entire body due to abnormal accumulation of serous fluid in the tissues, associated with severe anemia and occurring in ERYTHROBLASTOSIS, FETAL.

Edema, Intracranial
Increased intracellular or extracellular fluid in brain tissue. Cytotoxic brain edema (swelling due to increased intracellular fluid) is indicative of a disturbance in cell metabolism, and is commonly associated with hypoxic or ischemic injuries (see HYPOXIA, BRAIN). An increase in extracellular fluid may be caused by increased brain capillary permeability (vasogenic edema), an osmotic gradient, local blockages in interstitial fluid pathways, or by obstruction of CSF flow (e.g., obstructive HYDROCEPHALUS). (From Childs Nerv Syst 1992 Sep; 8(6):301-6)

Edema, Laryngeal
Edema of any region of the larynx from a variety of causes. In the earliest stages it may be difficult to differentiate from infection, although mucosal injection and erythema are found more often in the latter. Allergic edema may result as a response from provocation induced by foods, inhalants, and drugs. The entire respiratory tract or only an isolated portion of the larynx may be affected. Laryngeal edema may also be hereditary. Other possible causes of laryngeal edema include increased capillary pressure due to superior vena cava syndrome, internal jugular vein ligation, lowered plasma osmotic failure induced by renal failure, impaired lymphatic flow, and increased capillary permeability to proteins. (From Paparella et al., Otolaryngology, 3d ed, p2253)

Edema, Optic Disk
Swelling of the OPTIC DISK, usually in association with increased intracranial pressure, characterized by hyperemia, blurring of the disk margins, microhemorrhages, blind spot enlargement, and engorgement of retinal veins. Chronic papilledema may cause OPTIC ATROPHY and visual loss. (Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p175)

Edema, Optic Papilla
Swelling of the OPTIC DISK, usually in association with increased intracranial pressure, characterized by hyperemia, blurring of the disk margins, microhemorrhages, blind spot enlargement, and engorgement of retinal veins. Chronic papilledema may cause OPTIC ATROPHY and visual loss. (Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p175)

Edema, Retinal
Swelling of the OPTIC DISK, usually in association with increased intracranial pressure, characterized by hyperemia, blurring of the disk margins, microhemorrhages, blind spot enlargement, and engorgement of retinal veins. Chronic papilledema may cause OPTIC ATROPHY and visual loss. (Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p175)

Edema, Vasogenic Brain
Increased intracellular or extracellular fluid in brain tissue. Cytotoxic brain edema (swelling due to increased intracellular fluid) is indicative of a disturbance in cell metabolism, and is commonly associated with hypoxic or ischemic injuries (see HYPOXIA, BRAIN). An increase in extracellular fluid may be caused by increased brain capillary permeability (vasogenic edema), an osmotic gradient, local blockages in interstitial fluid pathways, or by obstruction of CSF flow (e.g., obstructive HYDROCEPHALUS). (From Childs Nerv Syst 1992 Sep; 8(6):301-6)

Edema, Vasogenic Cerebral
Increased intracellular or extracellular fluid in brain tissue. Cytotoxic brain edema (swelling due to increased intracellular fluid) is indicative of a disturbance in cell metabolism, and is commonly associated with hypoxic or ischemic injuries (see HYPOXIA, BRAIN). An increase in extracellular fluid may be caused by increased brain capillary permeability (vasogenic edema), an osmotic gradient, local blockages in interstitial fluid pathways, or by obstruction of CSF flow (e.g., obstructive HYDROCEPHALUS). (From Childs Nerv Syst 1992 Sep; 8(6):301-6)

Edema-Proteinuria-Hypertension Gestoses
Hypertensive state associated with edema and proteinuria which develops during pregnancy up to the 20th week of gestation, after which it is classified as pre-eclampsia.

Edema-Proteinuria-Hypertension Gestosis
Hypertensive state associated with edema and proteinuria which develops during pregnancy up to the 20th week of gestation, after which it is classified as pre-eclampsia.

Edemas, Angioneurotic
Recurring attacks of transient edema suddenly appearing in areas of the skin or mucous membranes and occasionally of the viscera, often associated with dermatographism, urticaria, erythema, and purpura.

Edemas, Cardiac
A manifestation of congestive heart failure caused by increased venous and capillary pressures and often associated with the retention of sodium by the kidneys. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Edemas, Corneal
An excessive amount of fluid in the cornea due to damage of the epithelium or endothelium causing decreased visual acuity.

Edemas, Cystoid Macular
Macular degeneration characterized by edema and cystic spaces which may lead to a macular depression or hole.

Edemas, Fetal
Edema of the entire body due to abnormal accumulation of serous fluid in the tissues, associated with severe anemia and occurring in ERYTHROBLASTOSIS, FETAL.

Edemas, Laryngeal
Edema of any region of the larynx from a variety of causes. In the earliest stages it may be difficult to differentiate from infection, although mucosal injection and erythema are found more often in the latter. Allergic edema may result as a response from provocation induced by foods, inhalants, and drugs. The entire respiratory tract or only an isolated portion of the larynx may be affected. Laryngeal edema may also be hereditary. Other possible causes of laryngeal edema include increased capillary pressure due to superior vena cava syndrome, internal jugular vein ligation, lowered plasma osmotic failure induced by renal failure, impaired lymphatic flow, and increased capillary permeability to proteins. (From Paparella et al., Otolaryngology, 3d ed, p2253)

Edemas, Optic Disk
Swelling of the OPTIC DISK, usually in association with increased intracranial pressure, characterized by hyperemia, blurring of the disk margins, microhemorrhages, blind spot enlargement, and engorgement of retinal veins. Chronic papilledema may cause OPTIC ATROPHY and visual loss. (Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p175)

Edemas, Optic Papilla
Swelling of the OPTIC DISK, usually in association with increased intracranial pressure, characterized by hyperemia, blurring of the disk margins, microhemorrhages, blind spot enlargement, and engorgement of retinal veins. Chronic papilledema may cause OPTIC ATROPHY and visual loss. (Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p175)

Edemas, Retinal
Swelling of the OPTIC DISK, usually in association with increased intracranial pressure, characterized by hyperemia, blurring of the disk margins, microhemorrhages, blind spot enlargement, and engorgement of retinal veins. Chronic papilledema may cause OPTIC ATROPHY and visual loss. (Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p175)



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