Dissection
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  Dissection



Dissection

   The process of cutting apart or separating tissue as, for example, in the study of anatomy or in the course of a surgical procedure.

RELATED TERMS
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Tissue
Biological tissue is a group of cells that perform a similar function.The study of tissues is known as histology, or, in connection with disease, histopathology.The classical tools for studying the tissues are the wax block, the tissue stain, and the optical microscope, though developments in electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and frozen sections have all added to the sum of knowledge in the last couple of decades.

Anatomy
The study of form. Gross anatomy involves structures that can be seen with the naked eye. It is as opposed to microscopic anatomy (or histology) which involves structures seen under the microscope.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Dissecan, Osteochondritis
A type of osteochondritis in which articular cartilage and associated bone becomes partially or totally detached to form joint loose bodies. Affects mainly the knee, ankle, and elbow joints.

Dissecans, Osteochondritis
A type of osteochondritis in which articular cartilage and associated bone becomes partially or totally detached to form joint loose bodies. Affects mainly the knee, ankle, and elbow joints.

Dissect
To cut apart or separate tissue as, for example, for anatomical study or in surgery. Also, an artery is said to dissect when its wall is torn, as in a dissecting aneurysm.

Dissecting Aneurysm
Splitting or dissection of an arterial wall by blood entering through an intimal tear or by interstitial hemorrhage. It is most common in the aorta.

Dissecting Aneurysms
Splitting or dissection of an arterial wall by blood entering through an intimal tear or by interstitial hemorrhage. It is most common in the aorta.

Dissecting Vertebral Artery Aneurysm
Dissection of the wall of the vertebral artery, leading to the formation of an aneurysm that may occlude the vessel. Thrombus formation may occur and give rise to emboli. Cervical fractures or related NECK INJURIES and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA are commonly associated conditions, although this process may occur spontaneously. Ischemia, infarction, and hemorrhage in the vascular distribution of the affected vertebral artery may complicate this condition.

Dissection, Anterior Spinal Artery
Ischemia or infarction of the spinal cord in the distribution of the anterior spinal artery, which supplies the ventral two-thirds of the spinal cord. This condition is usually associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS of the aorta and may result from dissection of an AORTIC ANEURYSM or rarely dissection of the anterior spinal artery. Clinical features include weakness and loss of pain and temperature sensation below the level of injury, with relative sparing of position and vibratory sensation. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1249-50)

Dissection, axillary
Surgery in which the axilla (the armpit) is opened -- to "dissect" means to "cut apart" -- in order to identify, examine, and sometimes remove structures such as lymph nodes or other tissue for diagnosis or treatment.

Dissection, Internal Carotid Artery
A hemorrhage into the wall of the carotid artery, separating the intima from the media and leading to aneurysm formation. This process may occlude the carotid artery and result in thromboembolic complications, including CEREBRAL INFARCTION. Dissections may occur spontaneously or follow CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; NECK INJURIES; and rarely severe bouts of coughing. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p830)

Dissection, Lymph Node
Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)

Dissection, neck
Surgery in which the neck is opened -- to "dissect" means to "cut apart" -- in order to identify, examine, and sometimes remove structures such as lymph nodes or other tissue for diagnosis or treatment. A radical neck dissection involves removal of a tumor from the neck with an additional margin of apparently normal tissue of at least 2 cm, as well as removal of the lymph nodes from the neck.

Dissection, Radical Neck
The most commonly performed major operation for head and neck malignancies, most of which are squamous cell carcinomas. The neck is opened laterally, the majority of the sternocleidomastoid muscle is removed, as are the regional cervical lymph nodes, the jugular vein, the spinal accessory nerve, the submaxillary gland and most of the parotid gland. There are several modifications. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992, p605)

Dissection, Vertebral Artery
Dissection of the wall of the vertebral artery, leading to the formation of an aneurysm that may occlude the vessel. Thrombus formation may occur and give rise to emboli. Cervical fractures or related NECK INJURIES and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA are commonly associated conditions, although this process may occur spontaneously. Ischemia, infarction, and hemorrhage in the vascular distribution of the affected vertebral artery may complicate this condition.

Dissections
The cutting apart or separating of tissues in a body or organism for anatomical study. In surgery, dissection separates different structures along natural lines. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)

Dissections, Lymph Node
Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)

Dissections, Radical Neck
The most commonly performed major operation for head and neck malignancies, most of which are squamous cell carcinomas. The neck is opened laterally, the majority of the sternocleidomastoid muscle is removed, as are the regional cervical lymph nodes, the jugular vein, the spinal accessory nerve, the submaxillary gland and most of the parotid gland. There are several modifications. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992, p605)

Dissections, Vertebral Artery
Dissection of the wall of the vertebral artery, leading to the formation of an aneurysm that may occlude the vessel. Thrombus formation may occur and give rise to emboli. Cervical fractures or related NECK INJURIES and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA are commonly associated conditions, although this process may occur spontaneously. Ischemia, infarction, and hemorrhage in the vascular distribution of the affected vertebral artery may complicate this condition.

Disseminated Coagulation, Intravascular
A disorder characterized by reduction in the elements involved in blood coagulation due to their utilization in widespread blood clotting within the vessels. The activation of the clotting mechanism may arise from any of a number of disorders. In the late stages, it is marked by profuse hemorrhaging. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Disseminated Coagulations, Intravascular
A disorder characterized by reduction in the elements involved in blood coagulation due to their utilization in widespread blood clotting within the vessels. The activation of the clotting mechanism may arise from any of a number of disorders. In the late stages, it is marked by profuse hemorrhaging. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Disseminated Encephalomyelitides, Acute
An acute or subacute inflammatory process of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM characterized histologically by multiple foci of perivascular demyelination. Symptom onset usually occurs several days after an acute viral infection or immunization, but it may coincide with the onset of infection or rarely no antecedent event can be identified. Clinical manifestations include CONFUSION, somnolence, FEVER, nuchal rigidity, and involuntary movements. The illness may progress to COMA and eventually be fatal. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p921)

Disseminated Encephalomyelitis, Acute
An acute or subacute inflammatory process of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM characterized histologically by multiple foci of perivascular demyelination. Symptom onset usually occurs several days after an acute viral infection or immunization, but it may coincide with the onset of infection or rarely no antecedent event can be identified. Clinical manifestations include CONFUSION, somnolence, FEVER, nuchal rigidity, and involuntary movements. The illness may progress to COMA and eventually be fatal. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p921)

Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation
A disorder characterized by reduction in the elements involved in blood coagulation due to their utilization in widespread blood clotting within the vessels. The activation of the clotting mechanism may arise from any of a number of disorders. In the late stages, it is marked by profuse hemorrhaging. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Disseminated Intravascular Coagulations
A disorder characterized by reduction in the elements involved in blood coagulation due to their utilization in widespread blood clotting within the vessels. The activation of the clotting mechanism may arise from any of a number of disorders. In the late stages, it is marked by profuse hemorrhaging. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Disseminated Neurodermatitides
A chronic inflammatory genetically determined disease of the skin marked by increased ability to form reagin (IgE), with increased susceptibility to allergic rhinitis and asthma, and hereditary disposition to a lowered threshold for pruritus. It is manifested by lichenification, excoriation, and crusting, mainly on the flexural surfaces of the elbow and knee. In infants it is known as infantile eczema.

Disseminated Neurodermatitis
A chronic inflammatory genetically determined disease of the skin marked by increased ability to form reagin (IgE), with increased susceptibility to allergic rhinitis and asthma, and hereditary disposition to a lowered threshold for pruritus. It is manifested by lichenification, excoriation, and crusting, mainly on the flexural surfaces of the elbow and knee. In infants it is known as infantile eczema.

Disseminated Sclerosis
An autoimmune disorder mainly affecting young adults and characterized by destruction of myelin in the central nervous system. Pathologic findings include multiple sharply demarcated areas of demyelination throughout the white matter of the central nervous system. Clinical manifestations include visual loss, extra-ocular movement disorders, paresthesias, loss of sensation, weakness, dysarthria, spasticity, ataxia, and bladder dysfunction. The usual pattern is one of recurrent attacks followed by partial recovery (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, RELAPSING-RE;MITTING), but acute fulminating and chronic progressive forms (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, CHRONIC PROGRESSIVE) also occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p903)

Dissemination, Information
Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)

Disseminatum, Xanthoma
Group of disorders which feature accumulations of active histiocytes and lymphocytes, but where the histiocytes are not Langerhans cells. The group includes hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, infection-associated hemophagocytic syndrome, sinus histiocytosis, xanthogranuloma, reticulohistiocytoma, juvenile xanthoma, xanthoma disseminatum, as well as the lipid storage diseases (sea-blue histiocyte syndrome and Niemann-Pick disease).

Dissent
The procedures through which a group approaches, attacks, and solves a common problem.

Dissertation, Academic
Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.

Dissertations, Academic
Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.

Dissociate
To separate or sunder that which is developing as a unity, or has become one, so that it becomes two or more unrelated or partially related entities. In mental life and its expression, these entities are experienced phenomenologically as trance states, alternative states of consciousness, fugue states, or multiple personalities.

Dissociated Nystagmus
Involuntary movements of the eye that are divided into two types, jerk and pendular. Jerk nystagmus has a slow phase in one direction followed by a corrective fast phase in the opposite direction, and is usually caused by central or peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Pendular nystagmus features oscillations that are of equal velocity in both directions and this condition is often associated with visual loss early in life. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p272)

Dissociation
disruption in the usually integrated functions of consciousness, memory, identity, or perception of the environment. The disturbance may be sudden or gradual, transient or chronic.

Dissociation Inhibitors, GDP
Protein factors that inhibit the dissociation of GDP from GTP-BINDING PROTEINS.

Dissociation, Auriculo-Ventricular
Impairment of conduction in heart excitation. It is often applied specifically to atrioventricular heart block. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Dissociations, Auriculo-Ventricular
Impairment of conduction in heart excitation. It is often applied specifically to atrioventricular heart block. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Dissociative Amnesia
Pathologic partial or complete loss of the ability to recall past experiences (AMNESIA, RETROGRADE) or to form new memories (AMNESIA, ANTEROGRADE). This condition may be of organic or psychologic origin. Organic forms of amnesia are usually associated with dysfunction of the DIENCEPHALON or HIPPOCAMPUS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp426-7)

Dissociative Amnesias
Pathologic partial or complete loss of the ability to recall past experiences (AMNESIA, RETROGRADE) or to form new memories (AMNESIA, ANTEROGRADE). This condition may be of organic or psychologic origin. Organic forms of amnesia are usually associated with dysfunction of the DIENCEPHALON or HIPPOCAMPUS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp426-7)

Dissociative Disorder
Sudden temporary alterations in the normally integrative functions of consciousness.

Dissociative Disorders
Sudden temporary alterations in the normally integrative functions of consciousness.

Dissociative Hallucination
Subjectively experienced sensations in the absence of an appropriate stimulus, but which are regarded by the individual as real. They may be of organic origin or associated with MENTAL DISORDERS.

Dissociative Hallucinations
Subjectively experienced sensations in the absence of an appropriate stimulus, but which are regarded by the individual as real. They may be of organic origin or associated with MENTAL DISORDERS.

Dissociative Hysteria
Sudden temporary alterations in the normally integrative functions of consciousness.

Dissociative Identity Disorder
A dissociative disorder in which the individual adopts two or more distinct personalities. Each personality is a fully integrated and complex unit with memories, behavior patterns and social friendships. Transition from one personality to another is sudden.

Dissociative Reaction
Sudden temporary alterations in the normally integrative functions of consciousness.

Dissociative Reactions
Sudden temporary alterations in the normally integrative functions of consciousness.

Dissonance, Cognitive
Motivational state produced by inconsistencies between simultaneously held cognitions or between a cognition and behavior; e.g., smoking enjoyment and believing smoking is harmful are dissonant.

Dissonances, Cognitive
Motivational state produced by inconsistencies between simultaneously held cognitions or between a cognition and behavior; e.g., smoking enjoyment and believing smoking is harmful are dissonant.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Disordered thinking
A failure to be able to "think straight." Thoughts may come and go rapidly. The person may not be able to concentrate on one thought for very long and may be easily distracted, unable to focus attention. The person may be unable to connect thoughts into logical sequences, with thoughts becoming disorganized and fragmented. This lack of logical continuity of thought, termed a "thought disorder," can make conversation very difficult and may contribute to social isolation. If people cannot make sense of what an individual is saying, they are likely to become uncomfortable and tend to leave that person alone. Disorder thinking is a characteristic feature of schizophrenia.

Disorders, lymphoproliferative
Malignant diseases of the lymphoid cells and cells from the reticuloendothelial system (which take up and sequester inert particles). The lymphoproliferative disorders are in contrast to the myeloproliferative disorders which are malignancies of certain bone marrow cells including those that give rise to the red blood cells, the granulocytes (types of white blood cells), and the platelets (crucial to blood clotting).

Disorders, myeloproliferative
Malignant diseases of certain bone marrow cells including those that give rise to the red blood cells, the granulocytes (types of white blood cells), and the platelets (crucial to blood clotting). The myeloproliferative disorders include myelophthisic anemia, erythroblastic leukemia, leukemoid reaction, myelofibrosis, myeloid metaplasia, polycythemia vera, and thrombocytosis. The myeloproliferative disorders are in contrast to the lymphoproliferative disorders which are malignancies of lymphoid cells and cells of the reticuloendothelial system (such as macrophages) which can take up inert particles and sequester them.

Disruption sequence
The events that occur when a fetus that is developing normally is subjected to a destructive agent such as the rubella (German measles) virus.

Dissect
To cut apart or separate tissue as, for example, for anatomical study or in surgery. Also, an artery is said to dissect when its wall is torn, as in a dissecting aneurysm.

Dissection

Dissection, axillary
Surgery in which the axilla (the armpit) is opened -- to "dissect" means to "cut apart" -- in order to identify, examine, and sometimes remove structures such as lymph nodes or other tissue for diagnosis or treatment.

Dissection, neck
Surgery in which the neck is opened -- to "dissect" means to "cut apart" -- in order to identify, examine, and sometimes remove structures such as lymph nodes or other tissue for diagnosis or treatment. A radical neck dissection involves removal of a tumor from the neck with an additional margin of apparently normal tissue of at least 2 cm, as well as removal of the lymph nodes from the neck.

Distance healing
Healing in which people seek to help patients simply with the power of the mind. Distance healing can include anything from therapeutic touch -- in which practitioners, without touching their patients, try to alter their energy fields -- to praying for people who are ill. Distance healing is part of the practice of alternative medicine.

Distichiasis
Double rows of eyelashes. The extra eyelashes grow from glands called the Meibomian glands and may protrude into the cornea, producing severe corneal abrasions.

Diverticulitis, bleeding from
Diverticular bleeding typically occurs intermittently over several days. Colonoscopy is usually performed to confirm the diagnosis and exclude bleeding from other causes. Thermal probes cannot be employed to stop active diverticular bleeding. Therefore, surgical removal of the bleeding diverticula is necessary for those with persistent bleeding.

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