Culture-specific syndromes
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  Culture-specific syndromes



Culture-specific syndromes

    Forms of disturbed behavior specific to certain cultural systems that do not conform to western nosologic entities. Some commonly cited syndromes are the following: amok; koro; latah; piblokto, and windigo.

RELATED TERMS
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Forms
A management function in which standards and guidelines are developed for the developing, maintaining, and handling of forms and records.

Amok
A culture specific syndrome from Malay involving acute indiscriminate homicidal mania.

Koro
A culture specific syndrome of China involving fear of retraction of penis into abdomen with the belief that this will lead to death.

Latah
A culture specific syndrome of Southeast Asia involving startle-induced disorganization, hypersuggestibility, automatic obedience, and echopraxia.

Piblokto
A culture specific syndrome of Eskimos involving attacks of screaming, crying, and running naked through the snow.

Windigo
A culture specific syndrome of Canadians involving delusions of being possessed by a cannibal-istic monster (windigo), attacks of agitated depression, oral sadistic fears and impulses.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Cult addiction
This very serious addiction is among the gravest dependence problems, and a widespread one. The atypical dissociative syndrome created by cults and sects is targeted to emotion, and the patients often lose their free will and decision making, and get completely subordinated to the cult's instructions.

Cultural Anthropology
The study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of a particular ethnic group.

Cultural Background
A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.

Cultural Backgrounds
A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.

Cultural Characteristic
Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.

Cultural Characteristics
Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.

Cultural Deprivation
The absence of certain expected and acceptable cultural phenomena in the environment which results in the failure of the individual to communicate and respond in the most appropriate manner within the context of society. Language acquisition and language use are commonly used in assessing this concept.

Cultural Deprivations
The absence of certain expected and acceptable cultural phenomena in the environment which results in the failure of the individual to communicate and respond in the most appropriate manner within the context of society. Language acquisition and language use are commonly used in assessing this concept.

Cultural Disadvantagement
The absence of certain expected and acceptable cultural phenomena in the environment which results in the failure of the individual to communicate and respond in the most appropriate manner within the context of society. Language acquisition and language use are commonly used in assessing this concept.

Cultural Disadvantagements
The absence of certain expected and acceptable cultural phenomena in the environment which results in the failure of the individual to communicate and respond in the most appropriate manner within the context of society. Language acquisition and language use are commonly used in assessing this concept.

Cultural Diversities
Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)

Cultural Diversity
Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)

Cultural Evolution
The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.

Cultural Evolutions
The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.

Cultural Pluralism
Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)

Culture
Growth of cells, tissues or embryos in vitro on an artificial nutrient medium in the laboratory.

Culture Diffusion Chamber
Devices used in a technique by which cells or tissues are grown in vitro or, by implantation, in vivo within chambers permeable to diffusion of solutes across the chamber walls. The chambers are used for studies of drug effects, osmotic responses, cytogenic and immunologic phenomena, metabolism, etc., and include tissue cages.

Culture Diffusion Chambers
Devices used in a technique by which cells or tissues are grown in vitro or, by implantation, in vivo within chambers permeable to diffusion of solutes across the chamber walls. The chambers are used for studies of drug effects, osmotic responses, cytogenic and immunologic phenomena, metabolism, etc., and include tissue cages.

Culture Media
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.

Culture Media, Conditioned
Culture media containing biologically active components obtained from previously cultured cells or tissues that have released into the media substances affecting certain cell functions (e.g., growth, lysis).

Culture Media, Serum Free
CULTURE MEDIA free of serum proteins but including the minimal essential substances required for cell growth. This type of medium avoids the presence of extraneous substances that may affect cell proliferation or unwanted activation of cells.

Culture Media, Serum-Free
CULTURE MEDIA free of serum proteins but including the minimal essential substances required for cell growth. This type of medium avoids the presence of extraneous substances that may affect cell proliferation or unwanted activation of cells.

Culture Medium, Conditioned
Culture media containing biologically active components obtained from previously cultured cells or tissues that have released into the media substances affecting certain cell functions (e.g., growth, lysis).

Culture, Cell
A technique for maintenance or growth of animal cells in vitro. It refers to cultures derived from dispersed cells taken from the original tissue, from a primary culture, or from a cell line or cell strain by enzymatic, mechanical, or chemical disaggregation. (From Dorland, 28th ed; Freshney, Culture of Animal Cells, 3d ed, p1)

Culture, Corporate
Beliefs and values shared by all members of the organization. These shared values are reflected in the day to day operations of the organization.

Culture, Organ
A technique for maintenance or growth of animal organs in vitro. It refers to three-dimensional cultures of undisaggregated tissue retaining some or all of the histological features of the tissue in vivo. (Freshney, Culture of Animal Cells, 3d ed, p1)

Culture, Organizational
Beliefs and values shared by all members of the organization. These shared values are reflected in the day to day operations of the organization.

Culture, Tissue
Maintaining or growing of tissue, organ primordia, or the whole or part of an organ in vitro so as to preserve its architecture and/or function (Dorland, 28th ed). Tissue culture includes both ORGAN CULTURE and CELL CULTURE.

Cultured Cell
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.

Cultured Cells
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.

Cultured Neoplastic Cell
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue for use in studying the proliferative and metabolic capacities of tumor cells, in predicting clinical responses to chemotherapy, in screening new antitumor agents, and in basic biological research. They include carcinoma cell lines.

Cultured Neoplastic Cells
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue for use in studying the proliferative and metabolic capacities of tumor cells, in predicting clinical responses to chemotherapy, in screening new antitumor agents, and in basic biological research. They include carcinoma cell lines.

Cultured Tumor Cell
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue for use in studying the proliferative and metabolic capacities of tumor cells, in predicting clinical responses to chemotherapy, in screening new antitumor agents, and in basic biological research. They include carcinoma cell lines.

Cultured Tumor Cells
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue for use in studying the proliferative and metabolic capacities of tumor cells, in predicting clinical responses to chemotherapy, in screening new antitumor agents, and in basic biological research. They include carcinoma cell lines.

Cultures
A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.

Cultures, Cell
A technique for maintenance or growth of animal cells in vitro. It refers to cultures derived from dispersed cells taken from the original tissue, from a primary culture, or from a cell line or cell strain by enzymatic, mechanical, or chemical disaggregation. (From Dorland, 28th ed; Freshney, Culture of Animal Cells, 3d ed, p1)

Cultures, Corporate
Beliefs and values shared by all members of the organization. These shared values are reflected in the day to day operations of the organization.

Cultures, Organ
A technique for maintenance or growth of animal organs in vitro. It refers to three-dimensional cultures of undisaggregated tissue retaining some or all of the histological features of the tissue in vivo. (Freshney, Culture of Animal Cells, 3d ed, p1)

Cultures, Organizational
Beliefs and values shared by all members of the organization. These shared values are reflected in the day to day operations of the organization.

Cultures, Tissue
Maintaining or growing of tissue, organ primordia, or the whole or part of an organ in vitro so as to preserve its architecture and/or function (Dorland, 28th ed). Tissue culture includes both ORGAN CULTURE and CELL CULTURE.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Counterphobia
Deliberately seeking out and exposing onself to, rather than avoiding, the object or situation that is consciously or unconsciously feared.

Countertransference
The therapist's emotional reactions to the patient that are based on the therapist's unconscious needs and conflicts, as distinguished from his or her conscious responses to the patient's behavior. Countertransference may interfere with the therapist's ability to understand the patient and may adversely affect the therapeutic technique. Currently, there is emphasis on the positive aspects of countertransference and its use as a guide to a more empathic understanding of the patient.

Cretinism
A type of mental retardation and bodily malformation caused by severe, uncorrected thyroid deficiency in infancy and early childhood.

Cri du chat
A type of mental retardation. The name is derived from a catlike cry emitted by children with this disorder, which is caused by partial deletion of chromosome 5.

Conversion symptom
A loss of, or alteration in, voluntary motor or sensory functioning suggesting a neurological or general medical condition. Psychological factors are judged to be associated with the development of the symptom, and the symptom is not fully explained by a neurological or general medical condition or the direct effects of a substance. The symptom is not intentionally produced or feigned and is not culturally sanctioned.

Culture-specific syndromes

Classical conditioning
Elicitation of a response by a stimulus that normally does not elicit that response. The response is one that is mediated primarily by the autonomic nervous system (such as salivation or a change in heart rate). A previously neutral stimulus is repeatedly presented just before an unconditioned stimulus that normally elicits that response. When the response subsequently occurs in the presence of the previously neutral stimulus, it is called a conditioned response, and the previously neutral stimulus, a conditioned stimulus.

Cranial
The anatomical term for towards the head; also the general term for of the head. i.e. the lungs are cranial to the pelvis. See Caudal/Inferior/Superior

Caudal
The anatomical term for towards the tail. i.e. the kidney is caudal to the shoulder. See Cranial/Superior/Inferior

Cachexia
A generally weakened, emaciated condition of the body.

Calciferol
Vitamin D.

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