Cortex, Motor
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  Cortex, Motor



Cortex, Motor

   Area of the frontal lobe concerned with primary motor control. It lies anterior to the central sulcus.

RELATED TERMS
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Frontal
In anatomy, pertaining to the forehead. As, for example, the frontal bone, frontal sinus, and frontal nerve.

Lobe
1. The fleshy lower part of the ear. 2. A well-defined portion of an organ.

Anterior
The front, as opposed to the posterior. The anterior surface of the heart is toward the breast bone (the sternum).

Central
In anatomy and medicine (as elsewhere), central is the opposite of "peripheral" which means away from the center.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Cort-dome
Cort-dome is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): hydrocortisone.

Cortalone
Cortalone is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): prednisolone.

Cortan
Cortan is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): prednisone.

Cortancyl
A synthetic anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid derived from CORTISONE. It is biologically inert and converted to PREDNISOLONE in the liver.

Cortef
Cortef is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): hydrocortisone.

Cortef acetate
Cortef acetate is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): hydrocortisone acetate.

Cortenema
Cortenema is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): hydrocortisone.

Cortex
The outer layer of the cerebrum, densely packed with nerve cells.

Cortex Decortication, Cerebral
Partial or total removal, ablation, or destruction of the cerebral cortex; may be chemical. It is not used with animals that do not possess a cortex, i.e., it is used only with mammals.

Cortex Decortications, Cerebral
Partial or total removal, ablation, or destruction of the cerebral cortex; may be chemical. It is not used with animals that do not possess a cortex, i.e., it is used only with mammals.

Cortex Disorder, Auditory
Disorders of hearing or auditory perception resulting from disease of the central auditory pathways or auditory association cortical areas. These include HEARING LOSS, CENTRAL; cortical deafness; and AUDITORY PERCEPTUAL DISORDERS. Above the level of the pons, bilateral lesions are usually required to produce auditory dysfunction.

Cortex Disorders, Auditory
Disorders of hearing or auditory perception resulting from disease of the central auditory pathways or auditory association cortical areas. These include HEARING LOSS, CENTRAL; cortical deafness; and AUDITORY PERCEPTUAL DISORDERS. Above the level of the pons, bilateral lesions are usually required to produce auditory dysfunction.

Cortex Effect, Adrenal
The outer layer of the adrenal gland. It secretes mineralocorticoids, androgens, and glucocorticoids.

Cortex Effects, Adrenal
The outer layer of the adrenal gland. It secretes mineralocorticoids, androgens, and glucocorticoids.

Cortex, adrenal
The outer portion of the adrenal gland located on top of each kidney. The adrenal cortex produces steroid hormones which regulate carbohydrate and fat metabolism and mineralocorticoid hormones which regulate salt and water balance in the body.

Cortex, Adrenal
The outer layer of the adrenal gland. It secretes mineralocorticoids, androgens, and glucocorticoids.

Cortex, Auditory
Area of the temporal lobe concerned with hearing.

Cortex, Cerebellar
The superficial gray matter of the cerebellum. It consists of two main layers, the stratum moleculare and the stratum granulosum. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Cortex, Cerebral
The thin layer of gray matter on the surface of the cerebral hemisphere that develops from the telencephalon and folds into gyri. It reaches its highest development in man and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.

Cortex, Crystalline Lens
The portion of the crystalline lens surrounding the nucleus and bound anteriorly by the epithelium and posteriorly by the capsule. It contains lens fibers and amorphous, intercellular substance.

Cortex, Entorhinal
The cytoarchitecturally well-defined area of multilaminate cerebral cortex on the medial aspect of the parahippocampal gyrus, immediately caudal to the olfactory cortex of the uncus. The entorhinal cortex is the origin of the major neural fiber system afferent to the hippocampus, the so-called PERFORANT PATHWAY. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Cortex, Kidney
The outer zone of the KIDNEY, beneath the capsule, consisting of KIDNEY GLOMERULUS; KIDNEY TUBULES, DISTAL; and KIDNEY TUBULES, PROXIMAL.

Cortex, Olfactory
Set of nerve fibers conducting impulses from olfactory receptors to the cerebral cortex. It includes the OLFACTORY NERVE; OLFACTORY BULB; olfactory tract, olfactory tubercle, anterior perforated substance, and olfactory cortex. The term rhinencephalon is restricted to structures in the CNS receiving fibers from the olfactory bulb.

Cortex, Prefrontal
The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the diencephalon, mesencephalon, and limbic system as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.

Cortex, Somatosensory
Area of the parietal lobe concerned with receiving general sensations. It lies posterior to the central sulcus.

Cortex, Striate
Area of the occipital lobe concerned with vision.

Cortex, Visual
Area of the occipital lobe concerned with vision.

Cortexolone
17,21-Dihydroxypregn-4-ene-3,20-dione. A 17-hydroxycorticosteroid with glucocorticoid and anti-inflammatory activities.

Corti Organ
The organ that contains the special sensory receptors for hearing. It is composed of a series of epithelial structures placed upon the inner part of the basilar membrane.

Cortical
Having to do with the cortex, the outer portion of an organ.

Cortical Blindness
A person with cortical blindness will have normal eyes and normal optic nerves but, nevertheless, will not be able to see. The cause of the blindness is with the cortex or surface of the brain that contains 32 or more sites for visual information processing. More recently, the preferred term for such individuals is cortical visual impairment, because many people will not be totally blind but will exhibit unusual visual losses; for example, they may be blind to stationary objects but be able to see moving objects.

Cortical blindness
Blindness due to loss or injury to the visual cortex, that section of the cerebral cortex responsible for vision, as through a stroke or traumatic brain damage.

Cortical Congenital Hyperostoses
A disease of young infants characterized by soft tissue swellings over the affected bones, fever, and irritability, and marked by periods of remission and exacerbation. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Cortical Congenital Hyperostosis
A disease of young infants characterized by soft tissue swellings over the affected bones, fever, and irritability, and marked by periods of remission and exacerbation. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Cortical Contusion
Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.

Cortical Contusions
Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.

Cortical Deafness
Hearing loss due to disease of the central nervous system auditory pathways, which originate in the cochlear nuclei of the pons and then ascend bilaterally to reach the inferior colliculi of the midbrain, medial geniculate bodies of the thalamus, and then the auditory cortices located in the temporal lobes. Bilateral lesions of the auditory pathways are usually required to cause central hearing loss. Cortical deafness refers to loss of hearing due to bilateral auditory cortex lesions. Unilateral brain stem lesions involving the cochlear nuclei may result in unilateral hearing loss.

Cortical Diplopia
A visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one. Disorders associated with this condition include REFRACTIVE ERRORS; STRABISMUS; OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES; TROCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES; and diseases of the BRAIN STEM and OCCIPITAL LOBE.

Cortical Diplopias
A visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one. Disorders associated with this condition include REFRACTIVE ERRORS; STRABISMUS; OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES; TROCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES; and diseases of the BRAIN STEM and OCCIPITAL LOBE.

Cortical Hyperostoses, Congenital
A disease of young infants characterized by soft tissue swellings over the affected bones, fever, and irritability, and marked by periods of remission and exacerbation. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Cortical Hyperostoses, Infantile
A disease of young infants characterized by soft tissue swellings over the affected bones, fever, and irritability, and marked by periods of remission and exacerbation. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Cortical Hyperostosis, Congenital
A disease of young infants characterized by soft tissue swellings over the affected bones, fever, and irritability, and marked by periods of remission and exacerbation. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Cortical Hyperostosis, Infantile
A disease of young infants characterized by soft tissue swellings over the affected bones, fever, and irritability, and marked by periods of remission and exacerbation. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Cortical Lewy Body Disease
A neurodegenerative disease characterized by dementia, mild parkinsonism, and fluctuations in attention and alertness. The neuropsychiatric manifestations tend to precede the onset of bradykinesia, MUSCLE RIGIDITY, and other extrapyramidal signs. DELUSIONS and visual HALLUCINATIONS are relatively frequent in this condition. Histologic examination reveals LEWY BODIES in the CEREBRAL CORTEX and BRAIN STEM. SENILE PLAQUES and other pathologic features characteristic of ALZHEIMER DISEASE may also be present. (From Neurology 1997;48:376-380; Neurology 1996;47:1113-1124)

Cortical magnification factor
Defined as millimeters of cortex per degree of visual angle.

Cortical Vigilance
Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.

Corticaltectal pathway
Pathway from the cortex to the superior colliculi.

Cortices, Cerebral
The thin layer of gray matter on the surface of the cerebral hemisphere that develops from the telencephalon and folds into gyri. It reaches its highest development in man and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.

Cortices, Entorhinal
The cytoarchitecturally well-defined area of multilaminate cerebral cortex on the medial aspect of the parahippocampal gyrus, immediately caudal to the olfactory cortex of the uncus. The entorhinal cortex is the origin of the major neural fiber system afferent to the hippocampus, the so-called PERFORANT PATHWAY. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Corticobulbar Tract
Fibers that arise from cells within the cerebral cortex, pass through the medullary pyramid, and descend in the spinal cord. Many authorities say the pyramidal tracts include both the corticospinal and corticobulbar tracts.

Corticobulbar Tracts
Fibers that arise from cells within the cerebral cortex, pass through the medullary pyramid, and descend in the spinal cord. Many authorities say the pyramidal tracts include both the corticospinal and corticobulbar tracts.

Corticoid I Receptor
Cytoplasmic proteins that specifically bind mineralocorticoids and mediate their cellular effects. The receptor with its bound ligand acts in the nucleus to induce transcription of specific segments of DNA. Mineralocorticoids were named for their actions on extracellular electrolyte concentrations. The most important example is aldosterone.

Corticoid I Receptors
Cytoplasmic proteins that specifically bind mineralocorticoids and mediate their cellular effects. The receptor with its bound ligand acts in the nucleus to induce transcription of specific segments of DNA. Mineralocorticoids were named for their actions on extracellular electrolyte concentrations. The most important example is aldosterone.

Corticoid II Receptor
Cytoplasmic proteins that specifically bind glucocorticoids and mediate their cellular effects. The glucocorticoid receptor-glucocorticoid complex acts in the nucleus to induce transcription of DNA. Glucocorticoids were named for their actions on blood glucose concentration, but they have equally important effects on protein and fat metabolism. Cortisol is the most important example.

Corticoid II Receptors
Cytoplasmic proteins that specifically bind glucocorticoids and mediate their cellular effects. The glucocorticoid receptor-glucocorticoid complex acts in the nucleus to induce transcription of DNA. Glucocorticoids were named for their actions on blood glucose concentration, but they have equally important effects on protein and fat metabolism. Cortisol is the most important example.

Corticoid Type I Receptors
Cytoplasmic proteins that specifically bind mineralocorticoids and mediate their cellular effects. The receptor with its bound ligand acts in the nucleus to induce transcription of specific segments of DNA. Mineralocorticoids were named for their actions on extracellular electrolyte concentrations. The most important example is aldosterone.

Corticoid Type II Receptors
Cytoplasmic proteins that specifically bind glucocorticoids and mediate their cellular effects. The glucocorticoid receptor-glucocorticoid complex acts in the nucleus to induce transcription of DNA. Glucocorticoids were named for their actions on blood glucose concentration, but they have equally important effects on protein and fat metabolism. Cortisol is the most important example.

Corticoids


Corticoliberin
A neuropeptide released by the hypothalamus that stimulates the release of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary gland.

Corticospinal Tract
Fibers that arise from cells within the cerebral cortex, pass through the medullary pyramid, and descend in the spinal cord. Many authorities say the pyramidal tracts include both the corticospinal and corticobulbar tracts.

Corticospinal Tracts
Fibers that arise from cells within the cerebral cortex, pass through the medullary pyramid, and descend in the spinal cord. Many authorities say the pyramidal tracts include both the corticospinal and corticobulbar tracts.

Corticosteroid
Hormones produced by the adrenal gland which are important to almost every function of cells and organs. They are divided into two groups: glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids. Glucocorticoids regulate protein, carbohydrate, and fat metabolism. Mineralocorticoids regulate electrolyte balances.

Corticosteroid allergy
A delayed allergic reaction to corticosteroid (drugs similar to cortisone). This occurs in 1-4% of people who use corticosteroids for asthma or other allergic diseases. A positive patch test to a corticosteroid means the patient cannot use that particular steroid. Although cross allergy between corticosteroids is common, such patients usually can tolerate another corticosteroid.

Corticosteroid drugs
Anti-inflammatory drugs that interfere with the immune system, suppress it and thereby dampen the inflammatory overreaction. They can be used to treat a number of allergic diseases - e.g. allergic rhinitis, eczema and rheumatoid arthritis. Corticosteroid drugs come as creams, inhalants, tablets and eye drops.

Corticosteroid hormones
Hormones produced by the adrenal glands.

Corticosteroid Receptor
Proteins found usually in the cytoplasm or nucleus that specifically bind steroid hormones and trigger changes influencing the behavior of cells. The steroid receptor-steroid hormone complex regulates the transcription of specific genes.

Corticosteroid Receptors
Proteins found usually in the cytoplasm or nucleus that specifically bind steroid hormones and trigger changes influencing the behavior of cells. The steroid receptor-steroid hormone complex regulates the transcription of specific genes.

Corticosteroids
Sometimes referred to just as 'steroids'. Hormones (which occur naturally) which have a variety of actions when given therapeutically. Usually administered for their anti-inflammatory effect. Their use is limited by unwanted side-effects which may sometimes be serious.

Corticostriatal Spinal Degeneration
A heterogenous group of degenerative syndromes marked by progressive cerebellar dysfunction either in isolation or combined with other neurologic manifestations. Sporadic and inherited subtypes occur. Inheritance patterns include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked.

Corticostriatal-Spinal Degeneration
A heterogenous group of degenerative syndromes marked by progressive cerebellar dysfunction either in isolation or combined with other neurologic manifestations. Sporadic and inherited subtypes occur. Inheritance patterns include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked.

Corticostriatal-Spinal Degenerations
A heterogenous group of degenerative syndromes marked by progressive cerebellar dysfunction either in isolation or combined with other neurologic manifestations. Sporadic and inherited subtypes occur. Inheritance patterns include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked.

Corticotrophin
Pituitary hormone that stimulates the secretion of adrenal cortical steroids and induces growth of the adrenal cortex. It is also present in human female urine and in the serum of pregnant mares. The substance is a single-chain polypeptide containing 39 amino acids, the first 24 of which are identical in all species. This 24-amino acid segment is said to be responsible for the biological activity of the peptide while the remaining 15-amino acid segment is said to be necessary for any immunological specificity. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)

Corticotrophin (1-39)
Pituitary hormone that stimulates the secretion of adrenal cortical steroids and induces growth of the adrenal cortex. It is also present in human female urine and in the serum of pregnant mares. The substance is a single-chain polypeptide containing 39 amino acids, the first 24 of which are identical in all species. This 24-amino acid segment is said to be responsible for the biological activity of the peptide while the remaining 15-amino acid segment is said to be necessary for any immunological specificity. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)

Corticotropin
Corticotropin is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): corticotropin.

Corticotropin (1-24)-Peptide
A synthetic polypeptide with adrenocorticotropic (CORTICOTROPIN) activity.

Corticotropin (1-24)-Tetracosapeptide
A synthetic polypeptide with adrenocorticotropic (CORTICOTROPIN) activity.

Corticotropin (1-39)
Pituitary hormone that stimulates the secretion of adrenal cortical steroids and induces growth of the adrenal cortex. It is also present in human female urine and in the serum of pregnant mares. The substance is a single-chain polypeptide containing 39 amino acids, the first 24 of which are identical in all species. This 24-amino acid segment is said to be responsible for the biological activity of the peptide while the remaining 15-amino acid segment is said to be necessary for any immunological specificity. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)

Corticotropin beta Lipotropin Precursor
A precursor protein, MW 30,000, synthesized mainly in the anterior pituitary gland but also found in the hypothalamus, brain, and several peripheral tissues. It incorporates the amino acid sequences of ACTH and beta-lipotropin. These two hormones, in turn, contain the biologically active peptides MSH, corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide, alpha-lipotropin, endorphins, and methionine enkephalin.

Corticotropin Receptor
Cell surface receptors that bind CORTICOTROPIN; (ACTH, adrenocorticotropic hormone) with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes. Pharmacology suggests there may be multiple ACTH receptors. An ACTH receptor has been cloned and belongs to a subfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors. In addition to the adrenal cortex, ACTH receptors are found in the brain and immune systems.

Corticotropin Receptors
Cell surface receptors that bind CORTICOTROPIN; (ACTH, adrenocorticotropic hormone) with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes. Pharmacology suggests there may be multiple ACTH receptors. An ACTH receptor has been cloned and belongs to a subfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors. In addition to the adrenal cortex, ACTH receptors are found in the brain and immune systems.

Corticotropin Releasing Factor
A neuropeptide released by the hypothalamus that stimulates the release of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary gland.

Corticotropin Releasing Factor 41
A neuropeptide released by the hypothalamus that stimulates the release of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary gland.

Corticotropin Releasing Factor Receptors
Cell surface proteins that bind corticotropin-releasing hormone with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The corticotropin releasing-hormone receptors on anterior pituitary cells mediate the stimulation of corticotropin release by hypothalamic corticotropin releasing factor. The physiological consequence of activating corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors on central neurons is not well understood.

Corticotropin Releasing Hormone
A neuropeptide released by the hypothalamus that stimulates the release of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary gland.

Corticotropin Releasing Hormone 41
A neuropeptide released by the hypothalamus that stimulates the release of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary gland.

Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Receptor
Cell surface proteins that bind corticotropin-releasing hormone with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The corticotropin releasing-hormone receptors on anterior pituitary cells mediate the stimulation of corticotropin release by hypothalamic corticotropin releasing factor. The physiological consequence of activating corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors on central neurons is not well understood.

Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Receptors
Cell surface proteins that bind corticotropin-releasing hormone with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The corticotropin releasing-hormone receptors on anterior pituitary cells mediate the stimulation of corticotropin release by hypothalamic corticotropin releasing factor. The physiological consequence of activating corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors on central neurons is not well understood.

Corticotropin Releasing-Factor Receptors
Cell surface proteins that bind corticotropin-releasing hormone with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The corticotropin releasing-hormone receptors on anterior pituitary cells mediate the stimulation of corticotropin release by hypothalamic corticotropin releasing factor. The physiological consequence of activating corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors on central neurons is not well understood.

Corticotropin Releasing-Hormone Receptor
Cell surface proteins that bind corticotropin-releasing hormone with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The corticotropin releasing-hormone receptors on anterior pituitary cells mediate the stimulation of corticotropin release by hypothalamic corticotropin releasing factor. The physiological consequence of activating corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors on central neurons is not well understood.

Corticotropin Releasing-Hormone Receptors
Cell surface proteins that bind corticotropin-releasing hormone with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The corticotropin releasing-hormone receptors on anterior pituitary cells mediate the stimulation of corticotropin release by hypothalamic corticotropin releasing factor. The physiological consequence of activating corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors on central neurons is not well understood.

Corticotropin-beta-Lipotropin Precursor
A precursor protein, MW 30,000, synthesized mainly in the anterior pituitary gland but also found in the hypothalamus, brain, and several peripheral tissues. It incorporates the amino acid sequences of ACTH and beta-lipotropin. These two hormones, in turn, contain the biologically active peptides MSH, corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide, alpha-lipotropin, endorphins, and methionine enkephalin.

Corticotropin-Releasing Factor
A neuropeptide released by the hypothalamus that stimulates the release of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary gland.

Corticotropin-Releasing Factor-41
A neuropeptide released by the hypothalamus that stimulates the release of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary gland.

Corticotropin-releasing hormone
A hormone made by the hypothalamus that stimulates the release of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary gland. Corticotropin-releasing hormone is abbreviated and often referred to as CRH.

Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone
A neuropeptide released by the hypothalamus that stimulates the release of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary gland.

Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH)
The hormone released from the hypothalamus. It interacts with the pituitary to produce ACTH. This hormone uses cyclic AMP for its second messenger.

Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptors
Cell surface proteins that bind corticotropin-releasing hormone with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The corticotropin releasing-hormone receptors on anterior pituitary cells mediate the stimulation of corticotropin release by hypothalamic corticotropin releasing factor. The physiological consequence of activating corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors on central neurons is not well understood.

Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-41
A neuropeptide released by the hypothalamus that stimulates the release of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary gland.

Corticoviridae
A family of icosahedral, lipid-containing, non-enveloped bacteriophages containing one genus (Corticovirus).

Corticovirus
A family of icosahedral, lipid-containing, non-enveloped bacteriophages containing one genus (Corticovirus).

Cortifair
The main glucocorticoid secreted by the adrenal cortex. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.

Cortifoam
Cortifoam is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): hydrocortisone acetate.

Cortinarius
An extensive order of basidiomycetous fungi whose fruiting bodies are commonly call mushrooms.

Cortis Organ
The organ that contains the special sensory receptors for hearing. It is composed of a series of epithelial structures placed upon the inner part of the basilar membrane.

Cortisol
The hormone released from the adrenal glands in response to stress or low blood glucose. Its primary mode of action in times of stress is to shut down eicosanoid synthesis. Its synthesis in the adrenal gland requires the second messenger, cyclic AMP.

Cortisone
An adrenocorticoid hormone, a naturally occurring hormone made by and secreted by the adrenal cortex, the outer part (the cortex) of the adrenal gland.

Cortisone acetate
Cortisone acetate is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): cortisone acetate.

Cortisone Reductase
An enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of a ketone and hydroxy group at C-20 of cortisone and other 17,20,21-trihydroxy steroids. EC 1.1.1.53.

Cortisporin
Cortisporin is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): bacitracin zinc; hydrocortisone; neomycin sulfate; polymyxin b sulfate.

Cortodoxone
17,21-Dihydroxypregn-4-ene-3,20-dione. A 17-hydroxycorticosteroid with glucocorticoid and anti-inflammatory activities.

Cortone
Cortone is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): cortisone acetate.

Cortosyn
A synthetic polypeptide with adrenocorticotropic (CORTICOTROPIN) activity.

Cortril
Cortril is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): hydrocortisone.

Cortrophin-zinc
Cortrophin-zinc is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): corticotropin-zinc hydroxide.

Cortrosyn
Cortrosyn is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): cosyntropin.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Cortexolone
17,21-Dihydroxypregn-4-ene-3,20-dione. A 17-hydroxycorticosteroid with glucocorticoid and anti-inflammatory activities.

Cortex, Prefrontal
The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the diencephalon, mesencephalon, and limbic system as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.

Cortex, Striate
Area of the occipital lobe concerned with vision.

Cortex, Visual
Area of the occipital lobe concerned with vision.

Cortex, Somatosensory
Area of the parietal lobe concerned with receiving general sensations. It lies posterior to the central sulcus.

Cortex, Motor

Cortex, Olfactory
Set of nerve fibers conducting impulses from olfactory receptors to the cerebral cortex. It includes the OLFACTORY NERVE; OLFACTORY BULB; olfactory tract, olfactory tubercle, anterior perforated substance, and olfactory cortex. The term rhinencephalon is restricted to structures in the CNS receiving fibers from the olfactory bulb.

Cortices, Cerebral
The thin layer of gray matter on the surface of the cerebral hemisphere that develops from the telencephalon and folds into gyri. It reaches its highest development in man and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.

Cortical Vigilance
Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.

Cortical Lewy Body Disease
A neurodegenerative disease characterized by dementia, mild parkinsonism, and fluctuations in attention and alertness. The neuropsychiatric manifestations tend to precede the onset of bradykinesia, MUSCLE RIGIDITY, and other extrapyramidal signs. DELUSIONS and visual HALLUCINATIONS are relatively frequent in this condition. Histologic examination reveals LEWY BODIES in the CEREBRAL CORTEX and BRAIN STEM. SENILE PLAQUES and other pathologic features characteristic of ALZHEIMER DISEASE may also be present. (From Neurology 1997;48:376-380; Neurology 1996;47:1113-1124)

Cortical Hyperostosis, Infantile
A disease of young infants characterized by soft tissue swellings over the affected bones, fever, and irritability, and marked by periods of remission and exacerbation. (Dorland, 27th ed)

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   cortex,motor / ortex, motor / crtex, motor / cotex, motor / corex, motor / cortx, motor / corte, motor / cortex motor / cortex,motor / cortex, otor / cortex, mtor / cortex, moor / cortex, motr / cortex, moto / ccortex, motor / coortex, motor / corrtex, motor / corttex, motor / corteex, motor / cortexx, motor / cortex,, motor / cortex, motor / cortex, mmotor / cortex, mootor / cortex, mottor / cortex, motoor / cortex, motorr / xortex, motor / sortex, motor / dortex, motor / fortex, motor / vortex, motor / ortex, motor / c9rtex, motor / c0rtex, motor / cprtex, motor / clrtex, motor / ckrtex, motor / cirtex, motor / c8rtex, motor / co4tex, motor / co5tex, motor / cottex, motor / cogtex, motor / coftex, motor / codtex, motor / coetex, motor / co3tex, motor / cor5ex, motor / cor6ex, motor / coryex, motor / corhex, motor / corgex, motor / corfex, motor / correx, motor / cor4ex, motor / cort3x, motor / cort4x, motor / cortrx, motor / cortfx, motor / cortdx, motor / cortsx, motor / cortwx, motor / cortez, motor / cortea, motor / cortes, motor / corted, motor / cortec, motor / corte , motor / cortex, notor / cortex, jotor / cortex, kotor / cortex, ,otor / cortex, otor / cortex, m9tor / cortex, m0tor / cortex, mptor / cortex, mltor / cortex, mktor / cortex, mitor / cortex, m8tor / cortex, mo5or / cortex, mo6or / cortex, moyor / cortex, mohor / cortex, mogor / cortex, mofor / cortex, moror / cortex, mo4or / cortex, mot9r / cortex, mot0r / cortex, motpr / cortex, motlr / cortex, motkr / cortex, motir / cortex, mot8r / cortex, moto4 / cortex, moto5 / cortex, motot / cortex, motog / cortex, motof / cortex, motod / cortex, motoe / cortex, moto3 /