Colon
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  Colon



Colon

    Another name for the large intestine. The section of the large intestine extending from the cecum to the rectum. An adult colon is approximately five to six feet in length and is responsible for absorbing water and forming, storing and expelling waste.

RELATED TERMS
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Intestine
The tube involved in digestion and extending from the stomach to the anus. Consists of the small intestine and the large intestine.

Cecum
The beginning of the large intestine. The cecum is connected to the lower part of the small intestine, called the ileum.

Rectum
An 8-inch chamber connected to the large intestine that receives solid waste (feces) from the descending colon to be expelled from the body. The rectum connects the colon to the anus. It is the rectum's job to receive stool from the colon, to let the person know that there is stool to be evacuated, and to hold the stool until evacuation happens.

Adult
A person having attained full growth or maturity. Adults are of 19 through 44 years of age.

Colon
Another name for the large intestine. The section of the large intestine extending from the cecum to the rectum. An adult colon is approximately five to six feet in length and is responsible for absorbing water and forming, storing and expelling waste.

Feet
The plural of foot, both an anatomic structure and a unit of measure. As an anatomic structure, the foot is the end of the leg on which a person normally stands and walks. The foot is a particularly complex structure made up of dozens of bones that work together with muscles and tendons to execute precise movements. The bones of the foot include the 10 metatarsal bones and the 28 phalanges (toe bones).



SIMILAR TERMS
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Coloboma
A congenital (born with) problem with the eye that is related to a maldevelopment or underdevelopment of a part of the eye. It may involve the eyelid, or interior part of the eye (involving the choroid and occasionally the optic nerve). No treatment is available.

Colocort
Colocort is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): hydrocortisone.

Colombia doctor
A doctor who, being or not a citizen of that country, has been admitted to practice medicine in Colombia.

Colombo doctors
All doctors near Colombo, Sri Lanka. Doctors who can assist a patient in Colombo.

Colon cancer
A malignant (cancerous) tumor arising from the inner wall of the large intestine. Although the exact causes of colon cancer are not known, it appears that both hereditary and environmental factors, like what we eat, play a role in its development. The early stages of cancer may have no symptoms.

Colon cancer and polyps
Benign tumors of the large intestine are called polyps. Malignant tumors of the large intestine are called cancers. Benign polyps do not invade nearby tissue or spread to other parts of the body. Benign polyps can be easily removed during colonoscopy, and are not life threatening. If benign polyps are not removed from the large intestine, they can become malignant (cancerous) over time. Most of the cancers of the large intestine are believed to have developed from polyps.

Colon cancer family history
A family history of colorectal cancer (CRC). First-degree relatives of people with CRC are themselves at a 2 to 3-fold increased risk of colorectal cancer. (Parents, brothers and sisters, and children are first-degree relatives.) When the family history includes 2 or more relatives with CRC, the possibility of an inherited CRC syndrome is increased.

Colon polyp
A fleshy growth on the inside (the lining) of the colon (the large intestine). Colon polyps are extremely common. Their incidence increases as individuals get older. Half of all people over the age of 60 harbor at least one polyp.

Colon polyps
Small, fleshy, mushroom-shaped growths in the colon.

Colon syndrome, nervous
A common gastrointestinal disorder involving an abnormal condition of gut contractions (motility) characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, mucous in stools, and irregular bowel habits with alternating diarrhea and constipation, symptoms that tend to be chronic and to wax and wane over the years. Although the disorder can cause chronic recurrent discomfort, it does not lead to any serious organ problems.

Colonaid
Colonaid is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): atropine sulfate; diphenoxylate hydrochloride.

Colonial Manor Nursing Home
The Colonial Manor Nursing Home is a hospital in York, Pennsylvania, United States.

Colonic (adjective)
Relating to the colon, that part of the large intestine that runs from the cecum to the rectum.

Colonic (noun)
Colonic irrigation, the infusion of liquid into the colon through a tube in the rectum.

Colonic inertia
A condition of the colon in which colon muscles do not work properly, causing constipation.

Colonoscope
A flexible, lighted instrument used to view the inside of the colon.

Colonoscopic polypectomy
The removal of tumor-like growths (polyps) using a device inserted through a colonoscope.

Colonoscopy
A procedure that allows the physician to view the entire length of the large intestine, and can often help identify abnormal growths, inflamed tissue, ulcers, and bleeding. It involves inserting a colonoscope, a long, flexible, lighted tube, in through the rectum up into the colon. The colonoscope allows the physician to see the lining of the colon, remove tissue for further examination, and possibly treat some problems that are discovered.

Colony-stimulating factor
A laboratory-made agent similar to a substance in the body that stimulates the production of blood cells.

Coloproctectomy
An operation to remove the colon and rectum. Also called proctocolectomy.

Color hearing
"A form of chromesthesia in which hearing a musical tone elicits the perception of a color. In one case, an art teacher had a broad range of consistent linkages between tone and color. For her, high octaves tended to evoke lighter color values, while lower octaves elicited darker ones. And rapid major chord tone sequences elicited rapid flashes of colors, ""somewhat like fireworks exploding."" "

Color opponency
When a cell is excited by one part of the visible spectrum and inhibited by another. First observed in ganglion cells in the retina.

Color opponent channel
Pathway that begins with the midget (parvo) ganglion cells in the retina and terminates within the parvocellular layer of the LGN. Conduction slower than that of Magnocellular Pathway.

Colorado River Medical Center
The Colorado River Medical Center is a hospital in San Bernardino, California, United States.

Colorado Springs doctors
All doctors near Colorado Springs, the United States of America.

Colorado tick fever
A viral illness spread by ticks. Characterized by headache, backache and fever that begins to break and then returns midway through the course of the illness.

Colorblindness
The inability to perceive colors in a normal fashion. The most common forms of colorblindness are inherited as sex-linked (X-linked) recessive traits. Females are carriers and males are affected. As a result, approximately 1 in 8 males is colorblind as compared to less than 1 in 100 females.

Colorblindness, red-green
A form of colorblindness in which red and green are perceived as identical. This is the most common type of colorblindness. It is also known as deuteranomaly, deuteranopia, and Daltonism.

Colorectal
Related to the colon and/or rectum.

Colorectal adenoma and carcinoma 1
Abbreviated CRAC1. Also known as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome.

Colorectal adenomatous polyposis, recessive
Autosomal recessive form of colorectal adenomatous polyposis.

Colorectal cancer
Cancer that occurs in the colon (large intestine) or the rectum (the end of the large intestine). A number of digestive diseases may increase a person's risk of colorectal cancer, including polyposis and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

Colorectal polyp
A polyp (a fleshy growth) on the inside lining of the colon or rectum.

Colorectal surgeon
A general surgeon who has had further training and is expert in the diagnosis and treatment of benign and malignant diseases of the colon, rectum, and anus.

Colorectal transit study
A test to see how food moves through the colon. The patient swallows capsules that contain small markers. An x-ray tracks the movement of the capsules through the colon.

Colostomy
An operation that makes it possible for stool to leave the body after the rectum has been removed. The surgeon makes an opening in the abdomen and attaches the colon to it. A temporary colostomy may be done to let the rectum heal from injury or other surgery.

Colostomy bag
A removable, disposable bag that attaches to the exterior opening of a colostomy (stoma) to permit sanitary collection and disposal of bodily wastes.

Colostomy, iliac
A colostomy in which the exterior opening (stoma) is located on the lower left side of the abdomen.

Colostomy, transverse
A colostomy in which the exterior opening (stoma) is located on the upper abdomen.

Colostrum
Thin, white, first milk produced by the breasts during late pregnancy and for a few days after childbirth. It provides a nursing infant with essential nutrients and infection-fighting antibodies.

Colour blindness
The inability to perceive differences between some or all colors that other people can distinguish. It is most often of genetic nature, but might also occur because of eye, nerve, or brain damage, or due to exposure to certain chemicals.

Colovage
Colovage is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): polyethylene glycol 3350; potassium chloride; sodium bicarbonate; sodium chloride; sodium sulfate, anhydrous.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Colon cancer
A malignant (cancerous) tumor arising from the inner wall of the large intestine. Although the exact causes of colon cancer are not known, it appears that both hereditary and environmental factors, like what we eat, play a role in its development. The early stages of cancer may have no symptoms.

Celecoxib
Celecoxib is in a class of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Celecoxib works by reducing substances that cause inflammation, pain, and fever in the body. Brand name: Celebrex.

Cialis
A medication used to treat erectile dysfunction that works by increasing the flow of blood into the penis.

Colonoscopy
A procedure that allows the physician to view the entire length of the large intestine, and can often help identify abnormal growths, inflamed tissue, ulcers, and bleeding. It involves inserting a colonoscope, a long, flexible, lighted tube, in through the rectum up into the colon. The colonoscope allows the physician to see the lining of the colon, remove tissue for further examination, and possibly treat some problems that are discovered.

Cervical cancer
Cancer of the uterine cervix, happens when normal cells in the cervix change into cancer cells. This change normally takes several years to happen, but it can also happen in a very short amount of time. Before the cells turn into cancer, abnormal cells develop on the cervix that can be found by a Pap test. Women generally don't have symptoms of cervical cancer. But when cervical cancer is not found early and spreads deeper into your cervix or to other tissues or organs, you might have pain during sex; bleeding from your vagina after sex, between periods, or after menopause; heavy vaginal discharge.

Colon

Cancer
Any malignant growth or tumor caused by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division; it may spread to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system or the blood stream.

Coronary thrombosis
Thrombosis is the formation of a clot or thrombus inside a blood vessel, obstructing the flow of blood through the circulatory system. Thromboembolism is a general term describing both thrombosis and its main complication: dislodgement of a clot and embolisation.

Cystitis
Bladder infection. Cystitis is considered as benign if it is not associated with an upper urinary tract infection or pyelonephritis, although it is often painful and uncomfortable (burning sensation when urinating). Cystitis may recur and this must be taken into account, particularly in the event of pregnancy, when urinary stasis is common.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is a chronic illness that affects many body systems and their functions, particularly the nervous and immune systems. The illness can cause extreme fatigue, muscle pain, memory loss and poor concentration.

Cataract
Opacity or cloudiness of the crystalline lens, which may prevent a clear image from forming on the retina. Surgical removal of the lens may be necessary if visual loss becomes significant, with lost optical power replaced with an intraocular lens, contact lens, or aphakic spectacles. May be congenital or caused by trauma, disease, or age.

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