Carbohydrates
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  Carbohydrates



Carbohydrates

    A type of food, usually derived from plants; one of three nutrients that supply calories to the body; includes simple carbohydrates (sugar, fruit) and complex carbohydrates (vegetables, starches).

RELATED TERMS
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Food
Any substance eaten to provide nutritional support for the body.

Nutrients
Proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, and minerals provided by food and necessary for growth and the maintenance of life.

Carbohydrates
A type of food, usually derived from plants; one of three nutrients that supply calories to the body; includes simple carbohydrates (sugar, fruit) and complex carbohydrates (vegetables, starches).



SIMILAR TERMS
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Carb
Slang for carbohydrate. Mainly sugars and starches, together constituting one of the three principal types of nutrients used as energy sources (calories) by the body. Carbohydrates can also be defined chemically as neutral compounds of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen.

Carbachol
Carbachol is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): carbachol.

Carbamazepine
An anticonvulsant.

Carbastat
Carbastat is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): carbachol.

Carbatrol
Carbatrol is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): carbamazepine.

Carbidopa
Carbidopa is a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor. Dopa decarboxylase is an enzyme that converts levodopa into dopamine - a major neurotransmitter and neuromodular of cellular function. Carbidopa is sometimes used to prevent the peripheral conversion of levodopa into dopamine in peripheral sites such as the gut, thus allowing more levodopa to reach the brain where it can have therapeutic effects.

Carbidopa and levodopa
Carbidopa and levodopa is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): carbidopa; levodopa.

Carbilev
Carbilev is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): carbidopa; levodopa.

Carbinoxamine maleate
Carbinoxamine maleate is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): carbinoxamine maleate.

Carbo-loading
An eating routine used by some athletes that involves downing large amounts of carbohydrates several days before a potentially exhausting endurance event. Carbo-loading has no known potential benefits for anyone except athletes under these special circumstances.

Carbocaine
Carbocaine is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): mepivacaine hydrochloride.

Carbocaine with neo-cobefrin
Carbocaine with neo-cobefrin is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): levonordefrin; mepivacaine hydrochloride.

Carbohydrate
One of the three main classes of foods and a source of energy. Carbohydrates are mainly sugars and starches that the body breaks down into glucose (a simple sugar that the body can use to feed its cells). The body also uses carbohydrates to make a substance called glycogen that is stored in the liver and muscles for future use. If the body does not have enough insulin or cannot use the insulin it has, which are the basic problems in most forms of diabetes, then the body will not be able to use carbohydrates for energy the way it should.

Carbohydrate intake, infant
Carbohydrates (glucose, lactose, sucrose, galactose, etc.) are sugars or several sugars linked together. Carbohydrates provide energy (calories) for the brain tissues, muscles, and other organs.

Carbolic acid
A synonym of phenol. In dilute solution, an antimicrobial agent.

Carbon dioxide
An odorless, colorless gas produced as the end product of aerobic respiration.

Carbon Dioxide
A gas created during metabolism, when the cells use oxygen to burn fat and release energy. The lungs release it when you breathe out.

Carbon dioxide content
A measure of the bicarbonate level in the blood. The normal carbon dioxide content may vary somewhat from one laboratory to another.

Carbon monoxide
An odorless, colorless, poisonous gas produced from the incomplete combustion of carbon. Prevents the blood from carrying oxygen.

Carbon Monoxide
A gas found in cigarette smoke; damages artery walls and reduces the ability of blood to carry oxygen, increasing the risk of coronary artery disease.

Carbon monoxide poisoning
Poisoning with carbon monoxide, a tasteless odorless gas that is a byproduct of combustion. Carbon monoxide acts as a poison by competing with oxygen for binding sites on hemoglobin, the molecule in red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to the more remote tissues of the body and returns carbon dioxide from the tissues to the lungs. On inhalation, carbon monoxide binds to hemoglobin with a binding affinity 200--270 times greater than that of oxygen.

Carbondale Nursing Home
The Carbondale Nursing Home is a hospital in Carbondale, Pennsylvania, United States.

Carboplatin
Carboplatin is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): carboplatin.

Carboxyhemoglobin
Hemoglobin that has carbon monoxide instead of the normal oxygen bound to it. Carbon monoxide has a much great affinity than oxygen for hemoglobin. Carboxyhemoglobin is formed in carbon monoxide poisoning. The source of the carbon monoxide may be exhaust (such as from a car, truck, boat or generator), smoke from a fire, or tobacco smoke. The level of carboxyhemoglobin is a measure of the degree of carbon monoxide exposure.

Carboxyhemoglobinemia
The presence of carboxyhemoglobin in the blood. Carboxyhemoglobin, hemoglobin that has carbon monoxide bound to it, is formed in carbon monoxide poisoning, as from exhaust (such as from a car, truck, boat or generator), smoke from a fire, or tobacco smoke.

Carbuncle
A hard, painful, pus-filled infection of the skin. Carbuncles are larger than boils and frequently have more than one opening.

Carbuncles
A skin abscess, a collection of pus that forms inside the body. Antibiotics are often not very helpful in treating abscesses. The main treatments include hot packs and draining ("lancing") the abscess, but only when it is soft and ready to drain. If you have a fever or long-term illness, such as cancer or diabetes, or are taking medications that suppress the immune system, you should contact your healthcare practitioner if you develop an abscess.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Chiropractic medicine
Chiropractic medicine is a form of treatment that uses manipulative therapy to correct subluxation, which many chiropracters hold are the cause of most disease. Although manipulative therapy has been shown to have some efficacy in treating back pain, headache, and other symptoms of spinal-related conditions, the application of chiropractic medicine as a cure or outside of this specific area is controversial and generally rejected by medical doctors in most countries. Practictioners of chiropractic medicine generally hold themselves out as doctors of chiropratic (D.C.). The use of manipulative therapy by D.C.'s to treat back pain, headache, and other spinal and musculo-skeletal symptoms enjoys wide acceptance by government medical authorities in many nations, where it is covered by many health plans such as Medicare in the United States. Although some medical doctors (M.D.'s) and many doctors of osteopathy (D.O.'s) do perform manipulative therapy, more than 90% of the treatment of back pain by manipulative therapy is performed by D.C.'s. The studies have shown a high level of patient satisfaction with manipulative therapy by persons with back problems.

Chorionic gonadotropin
Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a peptide hormone produced in pregnancy, that is made by the embryo soon after conception and later by the trophoblast (part of the placenta). Its role is to prevent the demise of the corpus luteum of the ovary and thereby maintain progesterone production that is critical for a pregnancy in humans. hCG may have additional functions, for instance it is thought that it affects the immune tolerance of the pregnancy.

Cytoskeleton
System of protein filaments in the cytoplasm of a eukaryotic cell that gives the cell a polarized shape and the capacity for directed movement. Its most abundant components are actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments.

Cell nucleus
An organelle, found in most eukaryotic cells, which contains most of the cell's genetic material. Nuclei have two primary functions: to control chemical reactions within the cytoplasm and to store information needed for cellular division. Plural: nuclei.

Calcitonin
A hormone secreted by the thyroid gland which controls the levels of calcium and phosphorous in the blood.

Carbohydrates

Cholesterol
A substance similar to fat that is found in the blood, muscles, liver, brain, and other body tissues.

Computer Tomography Scan
A diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of x-rays and computer technology to produce cross-sectional images (often called slices), both horizontally and vertically, of the body. A CT scan shows detailed images of any part of the body, including the bones, muscles, fat, and organs. CT scans are more detailed than general x-rays.

CAT scan
Computerized tomography diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of x-rays and computer technology to produce cross-sectional images (often called slices), both horizontally and vertically, of the body. A CT scan shows detailed images of any part of the body, including the bones, muscles, fat, and organs. CT scans are more detailed than general x-rays.

Corticoids


Comedone
Commonly know as black heads or white heads. This is where a hair follicle becomes plugged with sebum. When the lipid or sebum is exposed to the environment it is oxidized an turns black (black heads). When the follicle is closed and not exposed to the environment they are cream colored (white heads).

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