Adult
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  Adult



Adult

   A person having attained full growth or maturity. Adults are of 19 through 44 years of age.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Adult acne
Popular name for rosacea. For more information, see: Rosacea.

Adult Children
A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.

Adult Gangliosidosis GM1
A form of gangliosidosis characterized by accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides in lysosomes caused by an absence or severe deficiency of the enzyme BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (type A1). The three phenotypes of this disorder are infantile (generalized), juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, hypotonia, poor psychomotor development, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features hyperacusis, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive intellectual deterioration, involuntary movements, ataxia, and spasticity. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)

Adult Medulloblastomas
A malignant neoplasm that may be classified either as a glioma or as a primitive neuroectodermal tumor of childhood (see NEUROECTODERMAL TUMOR, PRIMITIVE). The tumor occurs most frequently in the first decade of life with the most typical location being the cerebellar vermis. Histologic features include a high degree of cellularity, frequent mitotic figures, and a tendency for the cells to organize into sheets or form rosettes. Medulloblastoma have a high propensity to spread throughout the craniospinal intradural axis. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2060-1)

Adult Neuroaxonal Dystrophy
A nonspecific term referring both to the pathologic finding of swelling of distal portions of axons in the brain and to disorders which feature this finding. Neuroaxonal dystrophy is seen in various genetic diseases, vitamin deficiencies, and aging. Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by arrested psychomotor development at 6 months to 2 years of age, ataxia, brain stem dysfunction, and quadriparesis. Juvenile and adult forms also occur. Pathologic findings include brain atrophy and widespread accumulation of axonal spheroids throughout the neuroaxis, peripheral nerves, and dental pulp. (From Davis & Robertson, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p927)

Adult Neurologic Saturnism
Neurologic conditions in adults associated with acute or chronic exposure to lead or any of its salts. The most common lead related neurologic syndrome in adults consists of a polyneuropathy involving motor fibers. This tends to affect distal nerves and may present as wrist drop due to RADIAL NEUROPATHY. Additional features of chronic lead exposure include ANEMIA; CONSTIPATION; colicky abdominal pain; a bluish lead line of the gums; interstitial nephritis (NEPHRITIS, INTERSTITIAL); and saturnine gout. An encephalopathy may rarely occur. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1212)

Adult Night Terrors
A disorder characterized by incomplete arousals from sleep associated with behavior suggesting extreme fright. This condition primarily affects children and young adults and the individual generally has no recall of the event. Episodes tend to occur during stage III or IV. SOMNAMBULISM is frequently associated with this condition. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p391)

Adult Oligodendrogliomas
A relatively slow-growing glioma that is derived from oligodendrocytes and tends to occur in the cerebral hemispheres, thalamus, or lateral ventricle. They may present at any age, but are most frequent in the third to fifth decades, with an earlier incidence peak in the first decade. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, relatively avascular, and tend to form cysts and microcalcifications. Neoplastic cells tend to have small round nuclei surrounded by unstained nuclei. The tumors may vary from well-differentiated to highly anaplastic forms. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2052; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p655)

Adult Onset Nemaline Myopathy
A group of inherited congenital myopathic conditions characterized clinically by weakness, hypotonia, and prominent hypoplasia of proximal muscles including the face. Muscle biopsy reveals large numbers of rod-shaped structures beneath the muscle fiber plasma membrane. This disorder is genetically heterogeneous and may occasionally present in adults. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1453)

Adult Onset Still Disease
Systemic-onset rheumatoid arthritis in adults. It differs from classical rheumatoid arthritis in that it is more often marked by acute febrile onset, and generalized lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly are more prominent.

Adult Optic Nerve Glioma
Glial cell derived tumors arising from the optic nerve, usually presenting in childhood. Roughly 50% are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1. Clinical manifestations include decreased visual acuity; EXOPHTHALMOS; NYSTAGMUS; STRABISMUS; pallor or swelling of the optic disc; and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION. The tumor may extend into the optic chiasm and hypothalamus. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p681)

Adult Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Diseases
A rare, slowly progressive disorder of myelin formation. Subtypes are referred to as classic, congenital, transitional, and adult forms of this disease. The classic form is X-chromosome linked, has its onset in infancy and is associated with a mutation of the proteolipid protein gene. Clinical manifestations include TREMOR, spasmus nutans, roving eye movements, ATAXIA, spasticity, and NYSTAGMUS. Death occurs by the third decade of life. The congenital form has similar characteristics but presents early in infancy and features rapid disease progression. Transitional and adult subtypes have a later onset and less severe symptomatology. Pathologic features include patchy areas of demyelination with preservation of perivascular islands (trigoid appearance). (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p190)

Adult primary liver cancer
A tumor in which the cancer starts during adulthood in cells in the liver. Also called hepatocellular carcinoma. Primary liver cancer is different from cancer that has metastasized (spread) from another place in the body to the liver.

Adult Progeria
An autosomal recessive disorder that causes premature aging in adults, characterized by sclerodermal skin changes, cataracts, subcutaneous calcification, muscular atrophy, a tendency to diabetes mellitus, aged appearance of the face, baldness, and a high incidence of neoplastic disease.

Adult respiratory distress syndrome
Better known as ARDS. See: ARDS.

Adult Reye Syndrome
An acute, potentially fatal metabolic disease seen primarily in children and characterized clinically by vomiting, hypoglycemia, and confusion, which may progress to coma. Pathologic features include cerebral edema and fatty infiltration of the liver and other organs. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1120)

Adult Sandhoff Disease
An autosomal inherited disease caused by deficiency of the enzymes hexosaminidase A & B (see BETA-N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE) which leads to an accumulation of GM2 ganglioside and the sphingolipid globoside in neurons and other organs. Clinical manifestations resemble TAY-SACHS DISEASE, but the disease is not limited to Askenazi Jews and may feature hepatosplenomegaly. The infantile form presents in the first 4 months of life with psychomotor delay, hypotonia followed by spasticity, and cherry red spots in the macula. Rare juvenile and adult forms have been reported. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p92)

Adult Sleep Bruxisms
A sleep disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth and forceful lateral or protrusive jaw movements. Sleep bruxism may be associated with TOOTH INJURIES; TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS; sleep disturbances; and other conditions.

Adult Spinal Muscular Atrophy
A group of disorders marked by progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord resulting in weakness and muscular atrophy, usually without evidence of injury to the corticospinal tracts. Diseases in this category include Werdnig-Hoffmann disease and later onset SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHIES OF CHILDHOOD, most of which are hereditary. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089)

Adult stem cell
An undifferentiated cell found in a differentiated tissue in an adult organism that can renew itself and can (with certain limitations) differentiate to yield all the specialized cell types of the tissue from which it originated.

Adult Subependymal Astrocytomas
Rare, slow-growing, benign intraventricular tumors, often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally. The tumors are classified histologically as ependymomas and demonstrate a proliferation of subependymal fibrillary astrocytes among the ependymal tumor cells. (From Clin Neurol Neurosurg 1997 Feb;99(1):17-22)

Adult T-cell leukemia
"Abbreviated ATL. A malignancy of mature T lymphocytes (T cells) with its onset in adulthood caused by infection with the human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) and characterized by circulating malignant T-lymphocytes, skin lesions, lymphadenopathy (enlarged lymph nodes), hepatosplenomegaly (enlarged liver and spleen), hypercalcemia (high blood calcium), lytic (""punched out"") bone lesions, and a tendency to infection. There are four categories of ATL, based on the aggressiveness of the disease -- smoldering, chronic, lymphoma, and acute. The disease is also called adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and adult T-cell lymphoma. See also: Human T-lymphotropic virus."

Adult T-Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma Virus I
A strain of PRIMATE T-LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS 1 isolated from mature T4 cells in patients with T-lymphoproliferation malignancies. It causes adult T-cell leukemia (LEUKEMIA-LYMPHOMA, T-CELL, ACUTE, HTLV-1-ASSOCIATED), T-cell lymphoma (LYMPHOMA, T-CELL), and is involved in mycosis fungoides, SEZARY SYNDROME and tropical spastic paraparesis (PARAPARESIS, TROPIC SPASTIC).

Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma
See: Adult T-cell leukemia.

Adult T-Cell Leukemias
Aggressive T-Cell malignancy with adult onset, caused by HUMAN T-LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS 1. It is endemic in Japan, the Caribbean basin, Southeastern United States, Hawaii, and parts of Central and South America and sub-Saharan Africa.

Adult T-cell lymphoma
See: Adult T-cell leukemia.

Adult Type Dermatomyositis
A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)

Adult, Frail Older
Older adults or aged individuals who are lacking in general strength and are unusually susceptible to disease or to other infirmity.

Adult-onset diabetes
Type 2 diabetes. See also Diabetes, type 2.

Adult-Onset Diabetes
Former term for Type 2 diabetes.

Adult-Onset Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes characterized by the ability to survive without ketoacidosis in the absence of insulin therapy. It is usually of slow onset and patients exhibit a tendency to obesity.

Adult-onset Still disease
"Although Still disease was first described in children, it is known to begin in adults (rarely). Of all patients with Still disease, 100% have high intermittent fever; 100% have joint inflammation and pain, muscle pain with fevers, and develop persistent chronic arthritis. Ninety-five percent (95%) have the faint salmon-colored skin rash. Eighty-five percent (85%) have swelling of the lymph glands or enlargement of the spleen and liver; and 85% have a marked increase in the white blood cell count. Sixty percent (60%) have inflammation of the lungs (pleuritis) or around the heart (pericarditis). Forty percent (40%) have severe anemia. And twenty percent (20%) have abdominal pain. "

Adulterations, Food
The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.

Adultery
Voluntary sexual intercourse between a married person and someone other than the spouse.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
--------------------------------------

Adult Neurologic Saturnism
Neurologic conditions in adults associated with acute or chronic exposure to lead or any of its salts. The most common lead related neurologic syndrome in adults consists of a polyneuropathy involving motor fibers. This tends to affect distal nerves and may present as wrist drop due to RADIAL NEUROPATHY. Additional features of chronic lead exposure include ANEMIA; CONSTIPATION; colicky abdominal pain; a bluish lead line of the gums; interstitial nephritis (NEPHRITIS, INTERSTITIAL); and saturnine gout. An encephalopathy may rarely occur. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1212)

Adult Neuroaxonal Dystrophy
A nonspecific term referring both to the pathologic finding of swelling of distal portions of axons in the brain and to disorders which feature this finding. Neuroaxonal dystrophy is seen in various genetic diseases, vitamin deficiencies, and aging. Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by arrested psychomotor development at 6 months to 2 years of age, ataxia, brain stem dysfunction, and quadriparesis. Juvenile and adult forms also occur. Pathologic findings include brain atrophy and widespread accumulation of axonal spheroids throughout the neuroaxis, peripheral nerves, and dental pulp. (From Davis & Robertson, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p927)

Adult Medulloblastomas
A malignant neoplasm that may be classified either as a glioma or as a primitive neuroectodermal tumor of childhood (see NEUROECTODERMAL TUMOR, PRIMITIVE). The tumor occurs most frequently in the first decade of life with the most typical location being the cerebellar vermis. Histologic features include a high degree of cellularity, frequent mitotic figures, and a tendency for the cells to organize into sheets or form rosettes. Medulloblastoma have a high propensity to spread throughout the craniospinal intradural axis. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2060-1)

Adult Gangliosidosis GM1
A form of gangliosidosis characterized by accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides in lysosomes caused by an absence or severe deficiency of the enzyme BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (type A1). The three phenotypes of this disorder are infantile (generalized), juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is characterized by skeletal abnormalities, hypotonia, poor psychomotor development, hirsutism, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features hyperacusis, seizures, and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive intellectual deterioration, involuntary movements, ataxia, and spasticity. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)

Adult Children
A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.

Adult

Adult Progeria
An autosomal recessive disorder that causes premature aging in adults, characterized by sclerodermal skin changes, cataracts, subcutaneous calcification, muscular atrophy, a tendency to diabetes mellitus, aged appearance of the face, baldness, and a high incidence of neoplastic disease.

Adult Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Diseases
A rare, slowly progressive disorder of myelin formation. Subtypes are referred to as classic, congenital, transitional, and adult forms of this disease. The classic form is X-chromosome linked, has its onset in infancy and is associated with a mutation of the proteolipid protein gene. Clinical manifestations include TREMOR, spasmus nutans, roving eye movements, ATAXIA, spasticity, and NYSTAGMUS. Death occurs by the third decade of life. The congenital form has similar characteristics but presents early in infancy and features rapid disease progression. Transitional and adult subtypes have a later onset and less severe symptomatology. Pathologic features include patchy areas of demyelination with preservation of perivascular islands (trigoid appearance). (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p190)

Adult-Onset Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes characterized by the ability to survive without ketoacidosis in the absence of insulin therapy. It is usually of slow onset and patients exhibit a tendency to obesity.

Adult, Frail Older
Older adults or aged individuals who are lacking in general strength and are unusually susceptible to disease or to other infirmity.

Adult Type Dermatomyositis
A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)

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