Acquired Blindness
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  Acquired Blindness



Acquired Blindness

   The inability to see or the loss or absence of perception of visual stimuli. This condition may be the result of EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; OPTIC CHIASM diseases; or BRAIN DISEASES affecting the VISUAL PATHWAYS or OCCIPITAL LOBE.

RELATED TERMS
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Condition
The term "condition" has a number of biomedical meanings including the following: 1.An unhealthy state, such as in "this is a progressive condition." 2.A state of fitness, such as "getting into condition." 3.Something that is essential to the occurrence of something else; essentially a "precondition." 4.As a verb: to cause a change in something so that a response that was previously associated with a certain stimulus becomes associated with another stimulus; to condition a person, as in behavioral conditioning.

DISEASES
A definite pathologic process with a characteristic set of signs and symptoms. It may affect the whole body or any of its parts, and its etiology, pathology, and prognosis may be known or unknown.

NERVE
Tissue that conveys sensation, temperature, position information to the brain.

Diseases
A definite pathologic process with a characteristic set of signs and symptoms. It may affect the whole body or any of its parts, and its etiology, pathology, and prognosis may be known or unknown.

BRAIN
"That part of the central nervous system that is located within the cranium (skull). The brain functions as the primary receiver, organizer and distributor of information for the body. It has two (right and left) halves called ""hemispheres."" "

LOBE
1. The fleshy lower part of the ear. 2. A well-defined portion of an organ.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Acquired
"Anything that is not present at birth but develops some time later. In medicine, the word ""acquired"" implies ""new"" or ""added."" An acquired condition is ""new"" in the sense that it is not genetic (inherited) and ""added"" in the sense that was not present at birth. For example, AIDS (the acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is an acquired form of immune deficiency due to the acquisition of HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus). An acquired mutation is a change in a gene that occurs in a single cell after the conception of the individual. That change is then passed along to all cells descended from that cell. Acquired mutations are involved in the development of cancer."

Acquired Agraphias
Loss or impairment of the ability to write (letters, syllables, words, or phrases) due to an injury to a specific cerebral area or occasionally due to emotional factors. This condition rarely occurs in isolation, and often accompanies APHASIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)

Acquired Alexia
A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES.

Acquired Aphasia
A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.

Acquired Communication Disorders
Disorders of verbal and nonverbal communication caused by receptive or expressive LANGUAGE DISORDERS, cognitive dysfunction (e.g., MENTAL RETARDATION), psychiatric conditions, and HEARING DISORDERS.

Acquired Deafnesses
A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears. Deafness may result from EAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; or BRAIN DISEASES.

Acquired Ear Deformity
Distortion or disfigurement of the ear caused by disease or injury after birth.

Acquired Encephaloceles
Cerebral tissue herniation through a congenital or acquired defect in the skull. The majority of congenital encephaloceles occur in the occipital or frontal regions. Clinical features include a protuberant mass that may be pulsatile. The quantity and location of protruding neural tissue determines the type and degree of neurologic deficit. Visual defects, psychomotor developmental delay, and persistent motor deficits frequently occur.

Acquired Epidermolysis Bullosa
Form of epidermolysis bullosa characterized by trauma-induced, subepidermal blistering with no family history of the disease. Direct immunofluorescence shows IMMUNOGLOBULIN G deposited at the dermo-epidermal junction.

Acquired Epileptic Aphasias
A syndrome characterized by the onset of isolated language dysfunction in otherwise normal children (age of onset 4-7 years) and epileptiform discharges on ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY. Seizures, including atypical absence (EPILEPSY, ABSENCE), complex partial (EPILEPSY, COMPLEX PARTIAL), and other types may occur. The electroencephalographic abnormalities and seizures tend to resolve by puberty. The language disorder may also resolve although some individuals are left with severe language dysfunction, including APHASIA and auditory AGNOSIA. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp749-50; J Child Neurol 1997 Nov;12(8):489-495)

Acquired epileptiform aphasia
See Landau-Kleffner syndrome.

Acquired Facial Neuropathy
Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.

Acquired Foot Deformities
Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth.

Acquired Foot Deformity
Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth.

Acquired Gerstmann Syndrome
A disorder of cognition characterized by the tetrad of finger agnosia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, and right-left disorientation. The syndrome may be developmental or acquired. Acquired Gerstmann syndrome is associated with lesions in the dominant (usually left) PARIETAL LOBE which involve the angular gyrus or subjacent white matter. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p457)

Acquired Hand Deformities
Deformities of the hand, or a part of the hand, acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease.

Acquired Hemolytic Anemias
Anemia due to decreased life span of erythrocytes.

Acquired Horner Syndrome
A syndrome associated with defective sympathetic innervation to one side of the face, including the eye. Clinical features include MIOSIS; mild BLEPHAROPTOSIS; and hemifacial ANHIDROSIS (decreased sweating)(see HYPOHIDROSIS). Lesions of the BRAIN STEM; cervical SPINAL CORD; first thoracic nerve root; apex of the LUNG; CAROTID ARTERY; CAVERNOUS SINUS; and apex of the ORBIT may cause this condition. (From Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, pp500-11)

Acquired Hyperostosis Syndromes
Syndrome consisting of synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO). The most common site of the disease is the upper anterior chest wall, characterized by predominantly osteosclerotic lesions, hyperostosis, and arthritis of the adjacent joints. The association of sterile inflammatory bone lesions and neutrophilic skin eruptions is indicative of this syndrome.

Acquired immunity
Immunity acquired by infection or vaccination (active immunity) or by the transfer of antibody or lymphocytes from an immune donor (passive immunity). Acquired immunity is in contrast to innate immunity (natural immunity).

Acquired immunodeficiency disease
Acquired immunodeficiency disease: Disease caused by infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
AIDS.

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndromes
An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.

Acquired Joint Deformity
Deformities acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease. The joint deformity is often associated with rheumatoid arthritis and leprosy.

Acquired Language Disorders
Conditions characterized by deficiencies of comprehension or expression of written and spoken forms of language. These include acquired and developmental disorders.

Acquired Meningocele
A congenital or acquired protrusion of the meninges, unaccompanied by neural tissue, through a bony defect in the skull or vertebral column.

Acquired Meningoceles
A congenital or acquired protrusion of the meninges, unaccompanied by neural tissue, through a bony defect in the skull or vertebral column.

Acquired Metabolic Encephalopathy
Acquired or inborn metabolic diseases that produce brain dysfunction or damage. These include primary (i.e., disorders intrinsic to the brain) and secondary (i.e., extracranial) metabolic conditions that adversely affect cerebral function.

Acquired mutation
A mutation (a genetic change) acquired by a somatic cell after conception. Acquired mutations occur in somatic cells, not germ cells, and so cannot be transmitted to the children. However, acquired mutations are transmitted to all cells descended from the mutant cell, giving rise to a clone (colony) of cells marked by the mutation. Some acquired mutations are involved in the development of cancer. Also known as an acquired genetic mutation, somatic mutation, or somatic cell mutation.

Acquired Myelomeningocele
Congenital, or rarely acquired, herniation of meningeal and spinal cord tissue through a bony defect in the vertebral column. The majority of these defects occur in the lumbosacral region. Clinical features include PARAPLEGIA, loss of sensation in the lower body, and incontinence. This condition may be associated with the ARNOLD-CHIARI MALFORMATION and HYDROCEPHALUS. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, pp35-6)

Acquired Neuromyotonia
A rare neuromuscular disorder with onset usually in late childhood or early adulthood, characterized by intermittent or continuous widespread involuntary muscle contractions; FASCICULATION; hyporeflexia; MUSCLE CRAMP; MUSCLE WEAKNESS; HYPERHIDROSIS; TACHYCARDIA; and MYOKYMIA. Involvement of pharyngeal or laryngeal muscles may interfere with speech and breathing. The continuous motor activity persists during sleep and general anesthesia (distinguishing this condition from STIFF-PERSON SYNDROME). Familial and acquired (primarily autoimmune) forms have been reported. (From Ann NY Acad Sci 1998 May 13;841:482-496; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1491)

Acquired Nose Deformity
Deformities of the nose acquired after birth from injury or disease.

Acquired Polyneuropathies
Diseases of multiple peripheral nerves simultaneously. Polyneuropathies usually are characterized by symmetrical, bilateral distal motor and sensory impairment with a graded increase in severity distally. The pathological processes affecting peripheral nerves include degeneration of the axon, myelin or both. The various forms of polyneuropathy are categorized by the type of nerve affected (e.g., sensory, motor, or autonomic), by the distribution of nerve injury (e.g., distal vs. proximal), by nerve component primarily affected (e.g., demyelinating vs. axonal), by etiology, or by pattern of inheritance.

Acquired Prosopagnosia
The inability to recognize a familiar face or to learn to recognize new faces. This visual agnosia is most often associated with lesions involving the junctional regions between the temporal and occipital lobes. The majority of cases are associated with bilateral lesions, however unilateral damage to the right occipito-temporal cortex has also been associated with this condition. (From Cortex 1995 Jun;31(2):317-29)

Acquired Reading Disability
A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES.

Acquired Spelling Dyslexia
A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES.

Acquired Vocal Cord Palsy
Paralysis of one or both vocal cords, which produces hoarseness or aphonia. This condition may be caused by diseases of the medulla (e.g., LATERAL MEDULLARY SYNDROME), VAGUS NERVE, or recurrent laryngeal nerve. Neuromuscular junction diseases and local myopathic processes may also affect vocal cord function. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1380)

Acquired Word Blindness
A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES.

Acquired Word Blindnesses
A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES.

Acquired-Immune Deficiency Syndrome Dementia Complex
A neurologic condition associated with the ACQUIRED IMMUNONDEFICIENCY SYNDROME and characterized by impaired concentration and memory, slowness of hand movements, ATAXIA, incontinence, apathy, and gait difficulties associated with HIV-1 viral infection of the central nervous system. Pathologic examination of the brain reveals white matter rarefication, perivascular infiltrates of lymphocytes, foamy macrophages, and multinucleated giant cells. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp760-1; N Engl J Med, 1995 Apr 6;332(14):934-40)

Acquisition, Health Facility
The combining of administrative and organizational resources of two or more health care facilities.

Acquisition, Knowledge (Computer)
The study and implementation of techniques and methods for designing computer systems to perform functions normally associated with human intelligence, such as understanding language, learning, reasoning, problem solving, etc.

Acquisitions, Health Facility
The combining of administrative and organizational resources of two or more health care facilities.

Acquisitions, Knowledge (Computer)
The study and implementation of techniques and methods for designing computer systems to perform functions normally associated with human intelligence, such as understanding language, learning, reasoning, problem solving, etc.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Activation Analysis
A method of chemical analysis based on the detection of characteristic radionuclides following a nuclear bombardment. It is also known as radioactivity analysis. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)

Activation Analysis, Neutron
Activation analysis in which the specimen is bombarded with neutrons. Identification is made by measuring the resulting radioisotopes. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)

Activating Factor, Phosphodiesterase
A heat-stable, low-molecular-weight activator protein found mainly in the brain and heart. The binding of calcium ions to this protein allows this protein to bind to cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases and to adenyl cyclase with subsequent activation. Thereby this protein modulates cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP levels.

Activating Enzymes, Complement
Enzymes present in the complement system which activate one or more components in the system.

Act, Tax Equity
PL97-248. Title II of the Act specifies ""provisions relating to savings in health and income security programs."" This includes changes in payment for services, benefits and premiums of Medicare as well as changes in provisions under Medicaid and other specific programs covered by Social Security. Title II includes various revenue measures.

Acquired Blindness

Activator Appliances
Loose-fitting removable orthodontic appliances which redirect the pressures of the facial and masticatory muscles onto the teeth and their supporting structures to produce improvements in tooth arrangements and occlusal relations.

Activations, Virus
The mechanism by which latent viruses, such as genetically transmitted tumor viruses or prophages of lysogenic bacteria, are induced to replicate and are released as infectious viruses. It may be effected by various endogenous and exogenous stimuli, including B-cell lipopolysaccharides, glucocorticoid hormones, halogenated pyrimidines, ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and superinfecting viruses.

Activations, Transcriptional
Increased rate of gene expression directed by either viral or cellular proteins. These regulatory factors (diffusible gene products) act in trans -- that is, act on homologous or heterologous molecules of DNA. (Cis-acting factors act only on homologous molecules.)

Activations, Platelet
A series of progressive, overlapping events triggered by exposure of the platelets to subendothelial tissue. These events include shape change, adhesiveness, aggregation, and release reactions. When carried through to completion, these events lead to the formation of a stable hemostatic plug.

Activations, Neutrophil
The process in which the neutrophil is stimulated by diverse substances, resulting in degranulation and/or generation of reactive oxygen products, and culminating in the destruction of invading pathogens. The stimulatory substances, including opsonized particles, immune complexes, and chemotactic factors, bind to specific cell-surface receptors on the neutrophil.

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