Access
Health dictionary
Untitled Document
Search :      

Art dictionary
Financial dictionary
Hollywood dictionary
Insurance dictionary
Literature dictionary
Real Estate dictionary
Tourism dictionary

 
  Access



Access

   1. In general, a means of approaching something. 2. In health care, the opportunity or right to receive health care. 3. In dialysis, the point on the body where a needle or catheter is inserted to gain entry to the bloodstream.

RELATED TERMS
--------------------------------------

Health
The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.

Dialysis
A treatment to remove certain molecules from the blood, particularly in people with kidney failure.

Catheter
A thin, flexible tube that carries fluids into or out of the body.



SIMILAR TERMS
--------------------------------------

Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythms
A transient and intermittent type of arrhythmia with episodes lasting from a few seconds to a minute which usually occurs in patients with acute myocardial infarction or with digitalis toxicity. Suppressive therapy is rarely necessary because the ventricular rate is generally less than 100 beats per minute.

Accelerated phase of leukemia
Refers to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) that is progressing. The number of immature, abnormal white blood cells in the bone marrow and blood is higher than in the chronic phase but not as high as in the blast phase.

Acceleration, Coriolis
The apparent deflection (Coriolis acceleration) of a body in motion with respect to the earth, as seen by an observer on the earth, attributed to a fictitious force (Coriolis force) but actually caused by the rotation of the earth. In a medical context it refers to the physiological effects (nausea, vertigo, dizziness, etc.) felt by a person moving radially in a rotating system, as a rotating space station. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)

Accelerators, Particle
Devices which accelerate electrically charged atomic or subatomic particles, such as electrons, protons or ions, to high velocities so they have high kinetic energy.

Accelographies
The graphic recording of chest wall movement due to cardiac impulses.

Accent
One of the FLAVORING AGENTS used to impart a meat-like flavor. Medically it has been used to reduce blood ammonia levels in ammoniacal azotemia, therapy of hepatic coma, in psychosis, and mental retardation.

Acceptability of Healthcare
The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.

Acceptable daily intake
Estimate of the amount of a substance in food or drinking water, expressed on a body mass basis (usually mg/kg body weight), which can be ingested daily over a lifetime by humans without appreciable health risk. For calculation of the daily intake per person, a standard body mass of 60 kg is used. The acceptable daily intake is normally used for food additives (tolerable daily intake is used for contaminants). Abbreviated ADI.

Acceptance Processes
The observable response a person makes to any situation.

Acceptance, Physician Assignment
Concept referring to the standardized fees for services rendered by health care providers, e.g., laboratories and physicians, and reimbursement for those services under Medicare Part B. It includes acceptance by the physician.

Acceptor Sites, Splice
Nucleotide sequences located at the ends of exons and recognized in pre-messenger RNA by the SPLICESOME. They are joined during the RNA SPLICING reaction, forming the junctions between exons.

Access Ports, Vascular
Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.

Accessibility of services
The ability to get medical care and services when needed.

Accessibility, Architectural
Designs for approaching areas inside or outside facilities.

Accessibility, Program
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.

Accessible
Refers to tumors that can be approached by a surgical procedure; tumors that are not deep in the brain or beneath vital structures. Inaccessible tumors cannot be approached by standard surgical techniques.

Accessory
Additional, extra, supplementary, subsidiary to the main thing. An accessory digestive organ is an organ that helps with digestion but is not part of the digestive tract. The accessory nerve is so-called because it receives an additional (accessory) root from the upper part of the spinal cord. An accessory placenta is an extra placenta separate from the main placenta.

Accessory Bodies of Cajal
A distinct subnuclear domain enriched in splicesomal snRNPs (RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS, SMALL NUCLEAR) and p80-coilin.

Accessory cell
Cell required for, but not actually mediating, a specific immune response. Often used to describe antigen-presenting cells (APC; see below).

Accessory Cells, Immunologic
Heterogeneous group of immunocompetent cells that mediates the cellular immune response by processing and presenting antigens to the T-cell receptor. Traditional antigen-presenting cells include MACROPHAGES; DENDRITIC CELLS; LANGERHANS CELLS; and B-LYMPHOCYTES. Follicular dendritic cells (DENDRITIC CELLS, FOLLICULAR) are also considered to be antigen-presenting cells by some authors.

Accessory digestive organ
An organ that helps with digestion but is not part of the digestive tract. The accessory digestive organs are the tongue, salivary glands, pancreas, liver, and gallbladder.

Accessory digestive organs
Organs that help with digestion but are not part of the digestive tract. These organs are the tongue, glands in the mouth that make saliva, pancreas, liver, and gallbladder.

Accessory dwelling unit
(ADU) A separate housing arrangement within a single-family home. The ADU is defined by Medicare as a complete living unit and includes a private kitchen and bath.

Accessory nerve
The eleventh cranial nerve, which emerges from the skull and receives an additional (accessory) root from the upper part of the spinal cord. It supplies the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. The sternocleidomastoid muscle is in the front of the neck and turns the head. The trapezius muscle moves the scapula (the wingbone), turns the face to the opposite side, and helps pull the head back. The accessory nerve is so-called because, although it arises in the brain, it receives an additional (accessory) root from the upper part of the spinal cord. Damage to the accessory nerve can be isolated (confined to the accessory nerve) or it may also involve the ninth and tenth cranial nerves which exit through the same opening (foramen) from the skull . Accessory neuropathy (nerve disease) can sometimes occur and recur for unknown reasons. Most patients recover. Paralysis of the accessory nerve prevents rotation of the head away from that side and causes drooping of the shoulder.

Accessory Nerve Diseases
Diseases of the eleventh cranial (spinal accessory) nerve. This nerve originates from motor neurons in the lower medulla (accessory portion of nerve) and upper spinal cord (spinal portion of nerve). The two components of the nerve join and exit the skull via the jugular foramen, innervating the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles, which become weak or paralyzed if the nerve is injured. The nerve is commonly involved in MOTOR NEURON DISEASE, and may be injured by trauma to the posterior triangle of the neck.

Accessory Nerves
The 11th cranial nerve. The accessory nerve originates from neurons in the medulla and in the cervical spinal cord. It has a cranial root, which joins the vagus (10th cranial) nerve and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the larynx, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid muscles. Damage to the nerve produces weakness in head rotation and shoulder elevation.

Accessory neuropathy
Disease of the accessory nerve which is the eleventh cranial nerve. The accessory nerve supplies the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. The sternocleidomastoid muscle is in the front of the neck and turns the head. The trapezius muscle moves the scapula (the wingbone), turns the face to the opposite side, and helps pull the head back. Damage to the accessory nerve can be confined to the accessory nerve or it may also involve the ninth and tenth cranial nerves which exit through the same opening (foramen) from the skull . Accessory neuropathy can sometimes occur and recur for unknown reasons. Most patients recover. Paralysis of the accessory nerve prevents rotation of the head away from that side and causes drooping of the shoulder.

Accessory oculomotor nucleus
Receives input from the pretectal area, innervates the ciliary ganglion. Mediates pupillary light reflexes.

Accessory Olfactory Bulbs
Ovoid body resting on the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone where the olfactory nerve terminates. The olfactory bulb contains several types of nerve cells including the mitral cells, on whose dendrites the olfactory nerve synapses, forming the olfactory glomeruli. The accessory olfactory bulb, which receives the projection from the VOMERONASAL ORGAN via the vomeronasal nerve, is also included here.

Accessory optic system (AOS)
Region of the vertebrate midbrain to which some optic nerve fibers project. Cells respond to large slowly moving textured patterns and are selective for both direction and speed of motion suggesting they are involved in the computation of global motion. Possibly used for the detection of retinal slip and used in image stabilization. Consists of two sets of retina ganglion cell fibers and three target nuclei in the anterior portion of the midbrain, the dorsal, medial and lateral nuclei.

Accessory Pancreatic Ducts
Ducts that collect PANCREATIC JUICE from the PANCREAS and supply it to the DUODENUM.

Accessory placenta
"An extra placenta separate from the main placenta. Also called a succenturiate or supernumerary placenta. The placenta is the organ joining the mother and fetus, the organ that permits the provision of oxygen and nutrients to the fetus and the release of carbon dioxide and waste products from the fetus to the mother. The word ""placenta"" means a flat cake. The main placenta is disk-shaped and at full term measures about 7 inches (18 cm) in diameter and a bit less than 2 inches (4 cm) thick. The upper surface of the placenta is smooth while the under surface is rough. The placenta and the fetal membranes are the afterbirth."

Accessory Sex Organs, Male
The male reproductive organs. They are divided into the external organs (penis, scrotum, and urethra) and the internal organs (testis, epididymis, ductus deferens, seminal vesicle, ejaculatory duct, prostate, and bulbourethral gland.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
--------------------------------------

Acaricide
An agent, usually a chemical, that kills mites. This class of pesticides is large and includes antibiotic acaricides, carbamate acaricides, formamidine acaricides, mite growth regulators, organophosphate acaricides, and many others. From the Latin acarus, a mite + -cide, to kill.

ACC
Adenoid cystic carcinoma.

Accelerated phase of leukemia
Refers to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) that is progressing. The number of immature, abnormal white blood cells in the bone marrow and blood is higher than in the chronic phase but not as high as in the blast phase.

Acceptable daily intake
Estimate of the amount of a substance in food or drinking water, expressed on a body mass basis (usually mg/kg body weight), which can be ingested daily over a lifetime by humans without appreciable health risk. For calculation of the daily intake per person, a standard body mass of 60 kg is used. The acceptable daily intake is normally used for food additives (tolerable daily intake is used for contaminants). Abbreviated ADI.

Access

Accessibility of services
The ability to get medical care and services when needed.

Accessory
Additional, extra, supplementary, subsidiary to the main thing. An accessory digestive organ is an organ that helps with digestion but is not part of the digestive tract. The accessory nerve is so-called because it receives an additional (accessory) root from the upper part of the spinal cord. An accessory placenta is an extra placenta separate from the main placenta.

Accessory digestive organ
An organ that helps with digestion but is not part of the digestive tract. The accessory digestive organs are the tongue, salivary glands, pancreas, liver, and gallbladder.

Accessory dwelling unit
(ADU) A separate housing arrangement within a single-family home. The ADU is defined by Medicare as a complete living unit and includes a private kitchen and bath.

Accessory nerve
The eleventh cranial nerve, which emerges from the skull and receives an additional (accessory) root from the upper part of the spinal cord. It supplies the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. The sternocleidomastoid muscle is in the front of the neck and turns the head. The trapezius muscle moves the scapula (the wingbone), turns the face to the opposite side, and helps pull the head back. The accessory nerve is so-called because, although it arises in the brain, it receives an additional (accessory) root from the upper part of the spinal cord. Damage to the accessory nerve can be isolated (confined to the accessory nerve) or it may also involve the ninth and tenth cranial nerves which exit through the same opening (foramen) from the skull . Accessory neuropathy (nerve disease) can sometimes occur and recur for unknown reasons. Most patients recover. Paralysis of the accessory nerve prevents rotation of the head away from that side and causes drooping of the shoulder.

   We thank you for using the Health Dictionary to search for Access. If you have a better definition for Access than the one presented here, please let us know by making use of the suggest a term option. This definition of Access may be disputed by other professionals. Our attempt is to provide easy definitions on Access and any other medical topic for the public at large.
 
This dictionary contains 59020 terms.      









  
                    © Health Dictionary 2005 - All rights reserved -

   ccess / acess / acess / accss / acces / acces / aaccess / acccess / acccess / acceess / accesss / accesss / qccess / wccess / sccess / xccess / zccess / axcess / ascess / adcess / afcess / avcess / a cess / acxess / acsess / acdess / acfess / acvess / ac ess / acc3ss / acc4ss / accrss / accfss / accdss / accsss / accwss / accews / accees / acceds / accexs / accezs / acceas / acceqs / accesw / accese / accesd / accesx / accesz / accesa / accesq /